PipeChat Digest #551 - Monday, October 12, 1998
 
1st Plymouth Schoenstein Lied Netiquette ? (x-posted)
  by "lchurst" <lchurst@binary.net>
Re: 1st Plymouth Schoenstein Lied Netiquette ? (x-posted)
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments
  by "John (Jack) Cormack" <jackjack@erols.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #548 - 10/10/98
  by "Tim Rand" <tim@minn.net>
Re: Organs On High
  by "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com>
RE: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Your visit to Florida...
  by "Terry Charles" <tcorgan@gte.net>
Re: The REAL difference (DB on soapbox; watch out)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: The REAL difference (DB on soapbox; watch out)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: 1st Plymouth Schoenstein Lied Netiquette ? (x-posted)
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Jerry Jorgensen
  by "Keith Fortune" <kfortune@webtv.net>
Fine organ recital
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Marcel Languetuit
  by "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
Reuter Organ in Summerall Chapel
  by "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
Re: Fine organ recital
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: Fine organ recital
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Re: Marcel Languetuit
  by <giwro@juno.com>
More on Marcel Lanquetuit
  by <Lewwill@aol.com>
Re: Reuter Organ in Summerall Chapel
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Can you find this music?  (x-posted many, many times)
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
 


(back) Subject: 1st Plymouth Schoenstein Lied Netiquette ? (x-posted) From: "lchurst" <lchurst@binary.net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 07:20:41 -0500   I will take delivery tomorrow of a text version of the Organ dedication program and a copy of "The Builders Perspective" by Jack Bethards, Pres. of Schoenstein & Co. The builders note is somewhat lengthy - presently one 8 1/2 x 11 both sides printed. Would the lists like me to upload it? I'm not trying to tease anyone!!!! - just don't want to make for a long download time and I realize that not everyone has web access to see these on the church site later this week.   Lou Hurst for First-Plymouth Congregational Church, UCC http://www.firstplymouth.org lchurst@binary.net    
(back) Subject: Re: 1st Plymouth Schoenstein Lied Netiquette ? (x-posted) From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 10:36:46 EDT   Hi Lou-----I for one would be very interested in seeing the builders notes,,and anything else that you might have on the new organ....so,,,if not uploading to the list generally,,,,would you be so kind to send it privately,,,when you have the time,,,   Thanks in advance,   Roc LVRockafellow  
(back) Subject: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 11:42:19 EDT     >Sure, if one can get pipes, get pipes! But, if it's a choice between no >organ (or a REALLY bad pipe organ) and an Allen Renaissance, one must start >to look at the issue with some objectivity.   What about both? A local organ builder has teamed up with the local Allen dealer to create a 3 rank pipe and 30+ Allen digital voicing. Sounds pretty good to me. Also, I heard the George Wright Special Allen in San Francisco this past summer. It had 32 speakers scattered around the stage and in the far front of the left and right balcony corners. The 4/30+ ranks sounded awesome to me, however, for the same money (around $130,000 minus any dealer discounts) one might get a decently sized 2-3 manual/ 6-12 rank real McCoy. Yet, if space limitations are a consideration...   Let me project a theory here concerning the basic difference between speakers and air pipes. Pipes create a subtle, yet positive air pressure in the room into which they speak, thus adding a presence to the listener that speakers can not, at this point, duplicate. I believe our skin is sensitive enough to detect this ever-so-slight air pressure increase. This pressure also affects the way the sound spreads throughout the room.   This phenomenon is most easily detected in the lower octaves of organ pipes. I first became aware of this phenomenon when I stood next to an electronic organ sub-woofer after having spent the earlier part of the day tuning a 16' bourdon in a Wurlitzer pipe chamber.   What brought this home to me was when I stood just off-stage during a local high school marching band's inside practice session. I then went home to listen to a marching band on my stereo, and the "presence" of the accoustical music was simply not felt.   My theory is that speakers created sound waves by move the air back and forth. The speaker cone, when at rest is located at position zero. When it is activated, the speaker cone moves to positions both in front of, and behind this zero position. Thus no positive air pressure is sent to the listener. Rather, the sound is created by alternating positive and negative air pressures caused by the cone's movement. When a pipe organ plays, the blower sends a constant stream of positive air pressure to the listener.   Music coming from speakers can never fully recreate the pipe sound until the air pressure difference is eliminated.   Is my theory a bunch of hot air? Oom Pah Pah....Swwwoooooooooooosh!   Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments From: "John (Jack) Cormack" <jackjack@erols.com> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 12:14:22 -0400   At 11:42 AM 10/12/98 EDT, Stan wrote: > <BIG SNIP> >What brought this home to me was when I stood just off-stage during a local >high school marching band's inside practice session. I then went home to >listen to a marching band on my stereo, and the "presence" of the acoustical >music was simply not felt. ************************************** Stan: Get a better stereo/speaker system along with some method of recreating the acoustic environment of the auditorium where the high school marching band practiced. A home environment that is "dead acoustically" makes a significant difference that detracts from the music.   Jack Cormack *************************************** >My theory is that speakers created sound waves by move the air back and forth. >The speaker cone, when at rest is located at position zero. When it is >activated, the speaker cone moves to positions both in front of, and behind >this zero position. Thus no positive air pressure is sent to the listener. >Rather, the sound is created by alternating positive and negative air >pressures caused by the cone's movement. >When a pipe organ plays, the blower sends a constant stream of positive air >pressure to the listener. *********************************** Stan: If the building were almost absolutely air tight and if the blower got its air supply from outside the building, then there might be some logic to your hypothesis that the air pressure in the room/auditorium is increased by the pipe organ blower. However, I doubt that any building is that well sealed off from the outside air pressure. If the blower gets its air supply from inside the building, the decrease in air pressure caused by the blower getting its air from inside the building is cancelled out by the blower putting the same air back inside the building. Net effect therefore is zero change in air pressure. If you want to try your "air pressure hypotheses" at home, just turn on the blower for your air conditioning system. That blows air into each room. In any event, musical instruments create both a pressure wave and rarefaction wave, so pipes, violins, trumpets, drums, etc. all produce an acoustic wave that consist of increase and decrease of air pressure. So the net air pressure environment (average air pressure) is unchanged by the music. The air molecules are simply moved back and forth -- no net change in air pressure. ************************************** >Music coming from speakers can never fully recreate the pipe sound until the >air pressure difference is eliminated. > >Is my theory a bunch of hot air? Oom Pah Pah....Swwwoooooooooooosh! *****************************   Yes.   It is the acoustic environment that makes the difference, not "air pressure" difference. But a genuinely excellent amplifier/speaker system helps.   Jack Cormack Potomac, Maryland ***************************** >Stan > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #548 - 10/10/98 From: "Tim Rand" <tim@minn.net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 11:24:29 -0500   > Subject: Fwd: Books on organ building > From: Administrator <admin@pipechat.org> > Date: Fri, 9 Oct 1998 19:52:14 -0500 > > I received the following message today - Since this person is not on the > list you will need to reply to him directly but please also CC the list > since this could be a good discussion topic. > > Thanks > > David > > >Date: Fri, 09 Oct 98 19:43:28 +0100 > >From: <jorge.gomez@nuclenor.es> > >To: <admin@pipechat.org> > >Subject: Books on organ building > >MIME-Version: 1.0 > >Sender: <admin@pipechat.org> > >Precedence: Bulk > > > > > >I'd like to find books on organ building. I'm more interested in those that > >contains detailed information on the measures of pipes and other parts of > the > >organ. The language could be English, French, German, Spanish, etc... If > >you can > >help me, please send an e-mail to: > > > >============================================ > >Jorge Gomez, from Santander, Spain > >jorge.gomez@nuclenor.es > >============================================ > > > > > >Thanks again. > > > **************************************** > David Scribner > Co-Owner / Technical Administrator > PipeChat > > 850-478-9635 > david@blackiris.com >     ___ Tim Rand 240 NE 6th St. Minneapolis MN 55413 (612) 378-1658 tim@minn.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs On High From: "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 09:26:58 PDT       Steven Skinner wrote:   > How about the organ at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, OR, a 3 > manual Casavant where the pedal, great, (positiv) and swell hang > from a basket in the center of the chapel, and a "choral" division > is behind the choir loft?   Actually, there are three divisions behind the choir loft near the organ console, a Choral division and two Continuo divisions (named Continuo I and Continuo II). Each of the continuo divisions are quite small, as I recall, with just a few flue stops including a mutation and one color reed.   There are also two or three "Choral Pedal" stops (I remember at least one 16' and one 8') which can be used to accompany the three divisions near the console. These three divisions can be coupled independently to any of the three manuals and/or Pedal.   The physical locations of the seven organ divisions allow for some unique effects. I remember one very interesting registration for Bach's "Schubler" setting of "Wachet Auf" which used 8' and 4' flutes in the Positiv overheard for the accompaniment and the Choral 8' Oboe for the cantus. The accompaniment swirled around above everyone's head while the chorale had a "heralding" effect down below because it seemed much more directional, coming from the organ loft.   Mark       Mark Huth Rodgers Instrument Corporation mhuth@rodgers.rain.com http://www.rodgerscorp.com   ==========================   Actual quote from grade school essay on classical music: 'Henry Purcell is a well-known composer few people have ever heard of.'    
(back) Subject: RE: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 09:52:57 -0700   > Let me project a theory here concerning the basic difference between speakers > and air pipes. Pipes create a subtle, yet positive air pressure in the room > into which they speak, thus adding a presence to the listener that speakers > can not, at this point, duplicate. I believe our skin is sensitive enough to > detect this ever-so-slight air pressure increase. This pressure also affects > the way the sound spreads throughout the room.   This is an interesting theory, since the "claim to fame" of electronics with tons of speakers is that they "move a lot of air".   I have an AOB with 46 speakers, it moves a lot of air. I'm going to have to check this out.   As an aside to this, I was at a concert last night with a pipe organ. The organ sounded like it was well ensconced in chambers, and the organist did a lot with the shutters closed. I came away "unconvinced" that it WAS a pipe organ, even though I saw pipes. I thought my AOB (where I'm virtually on top of the speakers) sounded better.   Perhaps Stan has something here?   Dennis Goward    
(back) Subject: Your visit to Florida... From: "Terry Charles" <tcorgan@gte.net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 13:20:05 -0400   Hi Jack,   I've a new computer system, lost all data in the transistion.   Please let me know again your plans/dates to visit us....   Terry    
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference (DB on soapbox; watch out) From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 12:02:46 -0700   At 11:42 AM 10/12/98 EDT, KriderSM@aol.com wrote:   >Let me project a theory here concerning the basic difference between speakers >and air pipes. Pipes create a subtle, yet positive air pressure in the room >into which they speak, thus adding a presence to the listener that speakers >can not, at this point, duplicate.<snip>   Hmmm...well, I have trouble with this already, since what you're proposing is that a change in static pressure in the auditorium would make the difference. Most commerical HVAC installations use at least 10% (by code out here) fresh air, which usually raises the static pressure in the conditioned space. So, if your theory where correct, simply turning on the air conditioning would make an electronic sound like pipes!   >This phenomenon is most easily detected in the lower octaves of organ pipes. I >first became aware of this phenomenon when I stood next to an electronic organ >sub-woofer after having spent the earlier part of the day tuning a 16' bourdon >in a Wurlitzer pipe chamber.<snip>   There are SO many variables here, that it's almost impossible to describe the differences between these two scenarios. The auditorium space and acoustics, relative acoustical power being radiated by either the pipe or the speaker, psychoacoustic phenominae, the list goes on and on. > >What brought this home to me was when I stood just off-stage during a local >high school marching band's inside practice session. I then went home to >listen to a marching band on my stereo, and the "presence" of the accoustical >music was simply not felt.<snip>   Listening to another band's recording, different program material, different acoustics, etc. etc. etc. ad nauseum, will definately yield different aural results!   >My theory is that speakers created sound waves by move the air back and forth. >The speaker cone, when at rest is located at position zero. When it is >activated, the speaker cone moves to positions both in front of, and behind >this zero position. Thus no positive air pressure is sent to the listener.<snip>   "Positive air pressure" (analogous to a DC component imposed on an AC signal) wouldn't travel "to the listener". It would simply pressurize the room in an omnidirectional fashion. The behavior of gases in an enclosed pressure vessel has been known for quite some time.   >Is my theory a bunch of hot air? Oom Pah Pah....Swwwoooooooooooosh!   Scientifically speaking, my humble opinion is that it doesn't hold water....er, air. However, it's great to see that you're thinking about the behavior of sound waves! There's a plethora of texts on the subjects that cover sound propagation. Delve into it! It's a fascinating phenomena!   Cheers,   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference (DB on soapbox; watch out) From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 12:02:46 -0700   At 11:42 AM 10/12/98 EDT, KriderSM@aol.com wrote:   >Let me project a theory here concerning the basic difference between speakers >and air pipes. Pipes create a subtle, yet positive air pressure in the room >into which they speak, thus adding a presence to the listener that speakers >can not, at this point, duplicate.<snip>   Hmmm...well, I have trouble with this already, since what you're proposing is that a change in static pressure in the auditorium would make the difference. Most commerical HVAC installations use at least 10% (by code out here) fresh air, which usually raises the static pressure in the conditioned space. So, if your theory where correct, simply turning on the air conditioning would make an electronic sound like pipes!   >This phenomenon is most easily detected in the lower octaves of organ pipes. I >first became aware of this phenomenon when I stood next to an electronic organ >sub-woofer after having spent the earlier part of the day tuning a 16' bourdon >in a Wurlitzer pipe chamber.<snip>   There are SO many variables here, that it's almost impossible to describe the differences between these two scenarios. The auditorium space and acoustics, relative acoustical power being radiated by either the pipe or the speaker, psychoacoustic phenominae, the list goes on and on. > >What brought this home to me was when I stood just off-stage during a local >high school marching band's inside practice session. I then went home to >listen to a marching band on my stereo, and the "presence" of the accoustical >music was simply not felt.<snip>   Listening to another band's recording, different program material, different acoustics, etc. etc. etc. ad nauseum, will definately yield different aural results!   >My theory is that speakers created sound waves by move the air back and forth. >The speaker cone, when at rest is located at position zero. When it is >activated, the speaker cone moves to positions both in front of, and behind >this zero position. Thus no positive air pressure is sent to the listener.<snip>   "Positive air pressure" (analogous to a DC component imposed on an AC signal) wouldn't travel "to the listener". It would simply pressurize the room in an omnidirectional fashion. The behavior of gases in an enclosed pressure vessel has been known for quite some time.   >Is my theory a bunch of hot air? Oom Pah Pah....Swwwoooooooooooosh!   Scientifically speaking, my humble opinion is that it doesn't hold water....er, air. However, it's great to see that you're thinking about the behavior of sound waves! There's a plethora of texts on the subjects that cover sound propagation. Delve into it! It's a fascinating phenomena!   Cheers,   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: 1st Plymouth Schoenstein Lied Netiquette ? (x-posted) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 15:09:43 -0400 (EDT)   Lou, First I would say check with the listowner for the final ok and recommendation of how to do it. We have had extremely long posts, parts of books, "short" stories, etc, which have all been great reading. If it is really long, maybe divide it into several smaller posts. I think that's how the other long ones were done.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o o h o o ______________ o o g o o o s o ______________ o a o o   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     To a dog the whole world is a smell. -- anonymous    
(back) Subject: Jerry Jorgensen From: kfortune@webtv.net (Keith Fortune) Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 13:12:53 -0700 (PDT)   It is with great sadness that I must report the death of Jerry Jorgensen on Sunday, Oct. 11, 1998. Jerry has been the head organist at the Oaks Park Roller Rink for almost 15 years. He also played at the Imperial rink here in Portland before that, and has taught organ for many years. I met Jerry in 1974. He sold me my first organ, and taught me how to play, since I played only the piano before that. Jerry's style of playing for skaters was always the best. Being a skater himself, he knew the importance of keeping perfect time, and he never missed a beat. In addition to playing locally, Jerry also provided the music for the J. O. Nationals held in various places in the country each year. Jerry, and his music will be missed by many. Condolences may be sent to his family to: Keith Fortune c/o Oaks Park Foot of SE Spokane Portland, Or. 97202    
(back) Subject: Fine organ recital From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 15:50:53 -0500   Last Thursday evening my wife and I attended a marvelous recital by David Higdon from the University of Kansas. He gave the recital here in Winfield at Southwestern College on the 35 rank Reuter. The recital was given on the Sell Memorial Organ Recital Series. Following is the program:   Litanies Jehan Alain (1911-1940)   Allein Gott in der Hoh sei Hoh', BWV 662 J.S. Bach (1685-1750)   Sonata No. 1 Paul Hindemith I. MaBig schnell (1893-1963) II.Sehr langsam Phantasie, frei Ruhig bewegt   Trois Danses Jehan Alain Joies Deuils Luttes   Postlude pour l'office de complies Jehan Alain   Toccata Stephen Paulus (b.1949)   I am the director of the Winfield (KS) Municipal Band and play clarinet in my own Traditional jazz group. My mother had a degree in organ and piano and I have been around both all my life. My wife teaches piano and studied organ. Her degree is in education also. I mention this only to preface the next statement. I felt this was a very demanding recital and that it was exceptionally well performed.     PS Hope I got at least most of the spelling correct.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Marcel Languetuit From: Barry H Bodie <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 16:57:22 -0400   I have recently become acquainted with the Toccata in D-major by Marcel Languetuit. The work is absolutely fascinating to me and I would like to find out more about the composer. The only thing I know about him is that he was the organist at St Ouen in Rouen. Help, please!!!!!    
(back) Subject: Reuter Organ in Summerall Chapel From: Barry H Bodie <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 17:23:03 -0400   Does anyone know of the status of this organ? There was apparently a 4 manual organ installed in Summerall Chapel at the Citadel in Charleston, SC in about 1965. Is it playable? Does anyone have specifications?    
(back) Subject: Re: Fine organ recital From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 16:47:23 -0500   At 03:50 PM 10/12/98 -0500, you wrote: > Last Thursday evening my wife and I attended a marvelous recital by >David Higdon from the University of Kansas. ....snip.... >PS Hope I got at least most of the spelling correct.   Hmmm,...   I've been to a concert by David Higgs...   I'm taking organ lessons with James Higdon...   ....but for the life of me I don't know any David Higdons! Dr. Higdon is online along with the rest of the organ department at the following URL.   http://www.ukans.edu/~mad/division/organ/organhome.html   I'm sure he'd love to hear from your wife--assuming she really liked the concert! ;-> By the way, those selections by Alain are recorded by him on the French Romantic Jaeckel organ. I think he did them on Arkay.   Robert Horton, Associate Minister of Music St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center 1800 Engel Road #970, Lawrence, KS 66045 http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "Do not dally with a singing girl, or you will be caught by her tricks." Sirach 9:4 (NRSV)  
(back) Subject: Re: Fine organ recital From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 16:52:50 -0500   >At 03:50 PM 10/12/98 -0500, you wrote: >> Last Thursday evening my wife and I attended a marvelous recital by >>David Higdon from the University of Kansas. >...snip.... >>PS Hope I got at least most of the spelling correct. > >Hmmm,... > >I've been to a concert by David Higgs... > >I'm taking organ lessons with James Higdon... > >...but for the life of me I don't know any David Higdons! >Dr. Higdon is online along with the rest of the organ department at the >following URL.   Of course you are right. That's worse than the wrong spelling. Thanks I'll post a correction and hope most see it. At any rate it was very fine.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Re: Marcel Languetuit From: giwro@juno.com Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 16:07:25 -0700   On Mon, 12 Oct 1998 16:57:22 -0400 Barry H Bodie <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> writes: >I have recently become acquainted with the Toccata in D-major by >Marcel Languetuit. The work is absolutely fascinating to me and I would like >to find out more about the composer. The only thing I know about him is >that he was the organist at St Ouen in Rouen. Help, please!!!!! >   Marcel Dupre remarks in his "Recollections" that Languetuit was his first pupil - Dupre was 15 and Languetuit was 8! He also states that Languetuit was the organist for the premiere of Dupre's oratorio "La France au Calvaire" in 1956.   Who published the Toccata? Can you describe it to us?   Regards,     *********************** Jonathan Orwig http://members.aol.com/giwro/index.html (personal) http://members.aol.com/evnsong/pgone.html (Music Publishing)   ___________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: More on Marcel Lanquetuit From: Lewwill@aol.com Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 19:29:13 EDT   Dear Listers   According to Corliss Arnold's ORGAN LITERATURE (1984), the entry on ML is as follows:   French, 20th century. 1914, won first prize in organ, Conservatory, Paris; until 1939, assistant to Dupre at St. Sulpice and at the organ class of the Conservatory, Paris; 1938, named organist of the Cathedral, Rouen; 1978 made honorary organist, Cathedral, Rouen; 1959, appointed organ professor, Conservatory, Rouen.   The Toccata was published by Alphonse Leduc in 1927.   Lew Williams  
(back) Subject: Re: Reuter Organ in Summerall Chapel From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 18:42:29 -0500 (CDT)   At 05:23 PM 10/12/98 -0400, Barrie H. Bodie wrote:   >Does anyone know of the status of this organ? There was apparently a 4 >manual organ installed in Summerall Chapel at the Citadel in Charleston, SC >in about 1965. Is it playable? Does anyone have specifications?   This is Reuter Op. 500, one of the largest Reuter organs ever built, and I visited it on the 1985 Organ Historical Society convention. I wasn't very taken with the instrument and the overall impression it has left me with is that it was somewhat woolly sounding. As far as I know it is still in good condition. I seem to remember it was 100 ranks or more, but I don't seem to have a specification.   John.    
(back) Subject: Can you find this music? (x-posted many, many times) From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 20:39:49 -0500   I am looking for a version of "Back Home Again in Indiana." If anyone can help me, I would be very appreciative.   Thanks,   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com