PipeChat Digest #554 - Wednesday, October 14, 1998
 
Re: The REAL difference between an electronic and a pipe organ
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: The REAL difference between an electronic and a pipe organ, death of
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
First-time T.O. experience: Evening on the Rialto Barton
  by <JCarington@aol.com>
The REAL difference....
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
A new subscriber's view
  by <GBorgan@aol.com>
Re: A new subscriber's view, reply to.
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: A new subscriber's view
  by "Jerrell Kautz" <jkautz@ebicom.net>
Some practical considerations
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: The REAL difference between an electronic and a pipe organ
  by "Owen Jones" <owenj@dynamite.com.au>
Re: The REAL difference...
  by <giwro@juno.com>
Re: Some practical considerations
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Rescheduled Recital
  by "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
Re: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
How many on this list
  by "Keith Fortune" <kfortune@webtv.net>
Re: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments
  by <GBorgan@aol.com>
The difference between......
  by "Keith Fortune" <kfortune@webtv.net>
Rescheduled Recital
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
NJ, Phantom of the Opera, Lee Erwin organ accompaniment
  by <Diaphone32@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference between an electronic and a pipe organ From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 18:43:41 -0700   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_005F_01BDF6D9.660C2510 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   >What matters to me is the challenge of interpreting a piece of music on = an organ and using the resources of that >instrument to its limit with = the hope of getting a positive result! =20 I can agree with this -- To me it doesn't matter whether it's pipe, = electronic or reed -- Just can I get what I want out of it, and will it = add to the worship service. =20 Dennis =20   ------=_NextPart_000_005F_01BDF6D9.660C2510 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 = http-equiv=3DContent-Type><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 = HTML//EN"> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.71.1712.3"' name=3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <BLOCKQUOTE=20 style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px"> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>&gt;What matters to me is the challenge of = interpreting a=20 piece of music on an organ and using the resources of that = &gt;instrument to=20 its limit with the hope of getting a positive result!</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>I can agree with this -- To me = it doesn't=20 matter whether it's pipe, electronic or reed -- Just can I get what = I want=20 out of it, and will it add to the worship service.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Dennis</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 = size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_005F_01BDF6D9.660C2510--    
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference between an electronic and a pipe organ, death of From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 14:57:06 EDT   Hi guys----- Referring to Greg's post about forgetting about the differences between pipe and electronic organs,,I agree wholeheardedly,,,lets drop the subject and let it die a natural death,if it can do so. Greg refers to the word tedious--IMHO- a good one!! As most of you know,,,I am an older organ fixer,,and a bit of a player too, and I was hearing the SAME comments and arguements 50 years ago. Tedious indeed, a half century later. From my perspective, a repairman, its usually the self same persons or committees that will "beat their chests" for hours about what a "maaahvellous" pipe organ their venue has,and then decry ANY expense for the instrument to keep it that way.   (hoping this will not engender new flaming about duct tape versus REAL leather for repairs,,) ;-) heheh~~   Cheers,   Roc  
(back) Subject: First-time T.O. experience: Evening on the Rialto Barton From: JCarington@aol.com Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 16:35:08 EDT     Last night I got a chance to play my first REAL theatre pipe organ (a 4/39 Barton) and I had Joliet's Rialto Theatre practically to myself for several hours.   Lee Maloney, Charlton Quinn and I attended the Hedman auction in South Bend, Indiana a few weeks ago, and as a way of saying thanks for hauling his Gulbransen Rialto II from Indiana to Joliet, Illinois, he said that we could spend an evening playing the giant 4/39 Barton.   So last night I took him up on it.   I prepared some music and sat down at the big white and gold console, and you know what? It was easier to play than I thought it would be (although I admit I relied heavily on the Generals). After spending 14 months practicing on my Lowrey Symphonic Theatre Organ (and enduring endless jokes and catcalls about my "Lowsey"), I have to admit that going to the Barton from the Lowrey was like going from a Model "T" to a Cadillac: more bells and whistles, but easier to drive overall.   I played "Serenade" from The Student Prince, Somewhere Over the Rainbow, As Time Goes By, Michelle (by McCartney and Lennon), Wonderful Copenhagen, Basin Street Blues, Stumbling, Ballin' the Jack, some Scott Joplin, Malaguena, and even got myself recorded on the organ computer so I could sit in the seats and hear myself play "Serenade," which in my opinion didn't sound too bad at all. I rounded it all out with a full-organ, second-touch-and-posthorns version of America (or God Save the Queen depending on which side of the Atlantic you are on). I was a little stiff at first, but loosened up enough to play a "Wonderful Copenhagen" while sailing up and down on the lift.   Lee and Charlton said I sizzled and that they were going to have to put asbestos on the keys for next time. I DID detect a hint of hyperbole in their adulation though. . .   I also got about an hour of videotape for posteriority.   In addition, I got a tour of the chambers while a pre-sequenced, full-organ- and-then-some finale played by Kay Macabee really put those pipes through their paces. Absolutely amazing sound in the chambers -- and no distortion, just rich, rich tones.   We took turns at the console, and each of us played several of our personal favorites.   What a great way to get introduced to the theatre organ.   Now I wish I had bought that $10,000 Kilgen when I had the chance!!!   John Carington Chesterton, Indiana    
(back) Subject: The REAL difference.... From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 16:48:15 EDT   PEOPLE, PEOPLE, PEOPLE!!!   THIS DISCUSSION WILL COME TO ORDER, PLEASE!   I merely wanted to know if anyone else could tell the difference between the electronic and pipe sounds??? If so, why is there a difference? I think I can, and therefore I advanced a theory to eliminate that difference. What a fine group of outspoken people I've run into here. :-)   We had better not use the toaster perspective, because the sound of the toaster ejecting that hot slice is much like the clunk of a faulty combination throw in an Austin console or the sound of a tracker's coupler engaging. Ughhh. {:-(   Personally, I think we ought return to the organ beater keyboard developed many centuries ago. How's that for changing my subject???   a jolly good discussion!   Stan  
(back) Subject: A new subscriber's view From: GBorgan@aol.com Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 17:20:24 EDT   As a salesman, I can tell you that in many cases it is just as hard to sell a $10,000 digital organ to a church as a $1million pipe organ to another. In both cases there will be members who love it, hate it, or take it for granted. Also, anyone (organist, consultant, or sales rep) who can talk a 500 member church into a $300,000 organ of 25 stops barely loud enough to lead the hymns is a much more talented salesman than I.   I was surprised to read some of the apparent frauds of the past from the pipe community. Of course these tactics would not be tolerated in Industry. One of the reasons the organ community gets away with things is due to the extremely small size. Consumer Reports couldn't be bothered. Talk about 'niche' marketing. This also explains my previous paragraph. The REASON a 500 member church would do something like that is because they put their full faith and trust in one or two people they hope will take care of everything of which the greater membership knows nothing. Unfortunately, in all too many cases, this has lead to a poor decision.   I think that any organist given charge of his own organ project should be willing to sign a contract to remain with the church at least five years after the organ is completed. How many have switched jobs soon after the dedication...   George  
(back) Subject: Re: A new subscriber's view, reply to. From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 17:56:11 EDT   George- Your last paragraph couldnt be more "right on". Yes,,,a five year contract would be a very very good thing. Your comments about trusting a very few people when architecting and/or speccing a new organ is very well taken also,,,, At my own home church, a 1913 Austin "classic" American pipe organ, with a decidedly "Skinneresque" flair had "tonal revisions" done in the mid 70's, and when the squealing baroqqqqeeeeeyyyy, quinty mess that resulted (IMHO of course ;-), the organist that had specced the revisions was "outta there" before the Spencer Orgoblo had hardly coasted to a stop after the dedication was over,,,,<sigh> but his legacy remains to this day, its really hard to get that money again, and about twice at least the amount today, to "put it back" ..   Cheers,   Roc    
(back) Subject: Re: A new subscriber's view From: "Jerrell Kautz" <jkautz@ebicom.net> Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 16:56:26 -0500   I know of a church that had a lovely 35 rank moller that was simply= marvelous to behold.   They hired a tracker-backer organist who convinced them to dump that= "trash" and get a real organ so they ended up with a one manual tracker of= 3 ranks for a bazillion dollars and the other organ was donated to a home= for the deaf. The organist was a happy camper.   Everyone won, right! Wrong. I changed churches, couldn't stand to hear the= same 3 ranks in every combination over and over, wheezing and whispering= while the congregation sang.   Some times people just lack the sense God gave a hammer.       *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********   On 10/13/98, at 5:20 PM, GBorgan@aol.com wrote:   >As a salesman, I can tell you that in many cases it is just as hard to= sell a >$10,000 digital organ to a church as a $1million pipe organ to another. In >both cases there will be members who love it, hate it, or take it for= granted. >Also, anyone (organist, consultant, or sales rep) who can talk a 500= member >church into a $300,000 organ of 25 stops barely loud enough to lead the= hymns >is a much more talented salesman than I. > >I was surprised to read some of the apparent frauds of the past from the= pipe >community. Of course these tactics would not be tolerated in Industry. One= of >the reasons the organ community gets away with things is due to the= extremely >small size. Consumer Reports couldn't be bothered. Talk about 'niche' >marketing. This also explains my previous paragraph. The REASON a 500= member >church would do something like that is because they put their full faith= and >trust in one or two people they hope will take care of everything of which= the >greater membership knows nothing. Unfortunately, in all too many cases,= this >has lead to a poor decision. > >I think that any organist given charge of his own organ project should be >willing to sign a contract to remain with the church at least five years= after >the organ is completed. How many have switched jobs soon after the >dedication... > >George > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Some practical considerations From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 17:32:21 -0700   OK, let's bring this down to the realm of the practical:   Case #1 - a small, wooden historic Victorian Presbyterian church, seating about 150-200. The choir area (elevated behind the pulpit) was large enough for a solo quartet and a reed organ. Sound dispersion was hampered by the fact that the ceiling dropped down over the back half of the nave so that folding wooden doors could be closed and the area be used for Sunday School.   The reed organ was replaced with a Hammond spinet (about all that would fit in its place). Over time, the church developed a large choir and an ambitious music program. As part of the centennial restoration of the building, a decision was made to replace the Hammond.   The communion table was removed from the front of the choir area, a couple of pews removed, and a podium built with a cut-out on one side that would handle a fairly large organ console.   Now ... conventional wisdom would have opted for a three or four-rank one-manual organ with tracker action. It would fit, but one of the doors to the vestibule would have to be covered up. The fire department wasn't having any.   The parish hall was directly behind the choir area ... it might have been possible to shoehorn a small unit organ into a chamber in that area, but in order for it to be heard in the back of the nave, it would have had to part the choir's toupees.   The church chose a large three-manual electronic organ. When I arrived, they were pretty unhappy with it. It had arrived, been uncrated and plugged in with no attempt at voicing or speaker placement. Over the course of the next few months, we carefully voiced it, relocated the speakers for optimum sound dispersement, turned down the trebles, and everybody was happy. Antiphonal speakers were provided to cover the odd shape of the back of the nave.   It wasn't great, but it would play most things tolerably well, and accompany a wide range of music (including cantatas and oratorios) for the choir.   Did they make the right choice?   Case #2 - a very retro "high" Anglican church, presently located in temporary quarters in an office/shopping complex. The present instrument is an unreliable "off-brand" electronic. Its only saving grace is an AGO console. The church is building an interim worship space of about 3,000 square feet seating about 150, but with a spacious 1,000 sq foot loft for organ, rehearsal piano, choir, robes, library, organist's office and computer station, etc. The main church is to be built in 5-10 years.   The Rector wants to wait until the main church is built before doing anything about the organ. The organist (me) wants rid of the present organ "yesterday".   In the midst of the discussion, the present organ expired with a mighty clang and the smell of burning insulation (with NO help from me, I might add!).   Should the church (1) buy a small electronic organ, (2) buy a larger electronic organ that can be moved into the main church until money is raised for a pipe organ, (3) buy a small new unit pipe organ that can be incorporated into a larger organ later, (4) buy a small second-hand electro-pneumatic pipe organ, or (5) buy a larger second-hand 3 or 4 manual Skinner, Moller, etc., install the Swell and Choir and part of the Pedal and store the rest? In all cases, a tracker is out of the question, since the position is combined organist/choirmaster and always will be. The amount of money available is $100K max.   To my way of thinking, this is the very common situation where a congregation sits right on the edge of being able to afford a pipe organ of any kind. The service is pure Victorian Anglican. The sound required is a Skinner, of course, or its first cousin. A unit organ isn't going to provide that; neither is a small electronic organ.   No decision has been made, partly because I can't decide the best course of action. Feedback, suggestions, etc. most welcome.   Bud Clark Choirmaster and Organist St. Matthew's Church Newport Beach CA            
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference between an electronic and a pipe organ From: Owen Jones <owenj@dynamite.com.au> Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 10:26:46 +1000       It is a matter of taste.   I have played both types of instruments for the past 40 years. The early electronic organs were not to my liking, they were not very satisfactory to play or listen to. However, pipe organs were as have been stated elsewhere, Inaccessible! Trying to get on and practice on one these holy instruments was like looking for the holy grail. A certain amount snobbery and have you been ordained to play the organ, if not get lost "My Son".   Some pipe organs sound like umhhhhhh not good! The same goes for the e-orgs.   I have given up playing the local TPO 3/9 Compton, because it sounds so bad. The local churches are having trouble keeping their pipe organs tuned and in good condition. I used to sing at the local cathedral, the organ there is second hand, 2/11 something or other!. It was wonderful "NOT" to sit listening to innumerable ciphers during the mass, I pity the priests, having the sermons interrupted by a cipher or ten.   I prefer to play my 3/20 e-org at home and what ever music I like pop or classic and at any time of the day or night, ah the joys of living by yourself. Not always a good thing i might add, however, it does have its little rewards.   IMHO I would prefer to play a good classic or TPO any time, the sound of well voiced pipes is truly exhilarating!. Keeping these instruments in good order, seems to be the lowest item on any parish agenda. It is true the church exists to help the poor and needy! Not to house organs costing megabucks in order just to satisfy the needs of few. Our organist is truly a virtuoso, however, when she plays the postlude, most of the congregation are out the the door before you can blink, leaving just a few to enjoy the wonderful sounds she gets out of this small organ.   Oh well, have to keep on grinding out the big 32' at home, causing the neighbours to wonder, "Are we having an earth tremor?"     Bye all   Owen    
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference... From: giwro@juno.com Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 17:46:07 -0700   On Tue, 13 Oct 1998 12:09:12 EDT KriderSM@aol.com writes:   <Snippage>   >Given the differences in accoustics, room size, number of speakers, >HVAC wind pressures, etc., I can always distinguish between a pipe organ and an >electronic organ when the lower notes are played. >I want to figure out WHY there is a difference, and inquire if other >organists with a more finely tuned ear for fine music can detect any >differences. > >I apologize for restarting the pipe vs. electronic war all over again. >This was not my intent. Can other musicians detect these differences, and, >if so, what causes the differences?   Well, Stan,   I'm not sure about frequency and or sound differences in pipe vs. electronics, but I would imagine that a sensitive ear _could_ tell the difference... Case in point: While preparing for my senior Composition recital a number of years ago, (on a 3M Allen with 4 32's, no less!) I noticed that the 32' ranks did not sound "right"... i.e. not like they normally did. The minister of music could not tell the difference, and I began to wonder if I was going koo-koo from the 3-5 hours of practice a day.... The repairman showed up, and found that there was a problem with the crossover to the woofers, and we were losing the BOTTOM 30 to 20 hz or so.... he was surprised that I could hear the difference! I was relieved to know I wasn't going nuts!   All that to say I think there are folks with sensitive enough hearing to tell the difference when something sounds different, be it pipes vs electronics or a small difference in sound due to an electronics problem. I must admit that the times I have heard Walker electronics that I have been fooled, and also once by a 3M Allen Renaissance. In all fairness, though, these situations were in rooms with fine acoustics, and that helps ANY organ, be it real or electronic. The thing that is usually missing from the low notes, IMHO is the power to make the building shake - it takes plenty of amplification and a very efficient set of subwoofers to mimic the intestine-rattling "feel" of a 32' open wood - most "typical" installations don't spend the extra $$ needed to get it right. I tried out in one church where they had 4 subwoofers and mucho amplification, the speakers (subwoofers) were mounted UNDER the stage/choir loft/chancel area... the console would literally "creep" across the floor when all of the 32's were drawn. YIKES!     *********************** Jonathan Orwig http://members.aol.com/giwro/index.html (personal) http://members.aol.com/evnsong/pgone.html (Music Publishing)   ___________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Some practical considerations From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 21:06:55 -0400   On Case 2: I like your plan number 5 the best, seems to me you would be getting the most for your money, and quality also which has stood the test of time, in getting a larger instrument. BTW I just rejoined PipeChat, been away from it since May, my computer crashed several times, I've been away (more on that later), and very busy, and now I have an upgraded system so I hope no more problems. Judy Ollikkala from Worcester MA  
(back) Subject: Rescheduled Recital From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Tue, 13 Oct 98 21:32:26 -0000   Greetings:   My recital which was originally scheduled for May 21 and cancelled due to severe weather damage has been rescheduled for this coming Sunday, October 18, at 2:00 P.M.   If any subscribers are in the Milwaukee/Waukesha area you are cordially invited to this program at:   FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 247 WISCONSIN AVENUE WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN   The program is as follows:   Prelude and Fugue in e minor ................. Johann Sebastian Bach (The Cathedral) Three Chorale Preludes ............................. Johannes Brahms " Blessed Ye Who Live In Faith Unswerving" "Ah, Dearest Jesus" "Low, How A Rose Breaks Into Bloom"   Dedication of Antiphonal Hooded Tuba   Hymn: ............... "God Of All Nations" ........ National Hymn   Will'O The Wisp ................................. Gordon Balch Nevin   Three Settings Of "Kum Ba Yah" ......................... John Behnke   Meditation on "Amazing Grace" ....................... Gilbert Martin   Eight Variations on "Leaning On The Everlasting Arms" .... Jon Spong   The instrument at First Baptist was built by E. M. Skinner #592, (1926), and enlarged by M.P. Moller, 1956.   The hooded trumpet was manufactured by A. J. Schopp's Sons, Inc. 1998.   Voicing and regulation are done by William Hansen, organ curator.  
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 21:53:43 -0500   I wasted 20 minutes of my time writing an essay about my dislike of electronic organs and why. I was diverted for about 20 seconds, and turned back around to find my computer had frozen up on me, and all was lost...it took 20 seconds to destroy 20 minutes of work.   Anyway, basically, I don't like electronic organs, they are not good representations of the real thing, leading unknowers to wrong beliefs, and there are several aspects such as no noise when the tremulants are on and no noise when the expression pedals are moved, no whisp in speech (especially "theatre" models), and I think electronic organs are *partly* responsible for the lower numbers of existing pipe organs today, with a strong blame placed on the theatre pipe organ fate. Modern Digital Electronic organs sound wonderful at first, but they absolutely stink after time passes...especially theatre organs. Some builders think they can slip some Hammond-sounding c r a p into something like their "representation" of a theatre organ.   Sorry for expressing my worthless opinion, hope my bad...no, horrible day hasn't rubbed off on anyone. Flaming wastes my time as well as yours, but still doesn't bother me...don't try it. I've got to finish up and get to bed, my hands are not obeying my brain.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com      
(back) Subject: How many on this list From: kfortune@webtv.net (Keith Fortune) Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 20:17:27 -0700 (PDT)   I'm curious, having just subscribed to this list, about how many people there are here. Anyone got the stats?   Keith    
(back) Subject: Re: The REAL difference between pipe & electronic instruments From: GBorgan@aol.com Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 00:03:46 EDT   In a message dated 10/13/98 8:08:03 PM Pacific Daylight Time, kevin1@alaweb.com writes:   << Anyway, basically, I don't like electronic organs, >> So?  
(back) Subject: The difference between...... From: kfortune@webtv.net (Keith Fortune) Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 21:52:51 -0700 (PDT)   Enough already. Sheesh. Everybody's got their own opinion about pipe vs. electronic. I may be new, but I'm sure this topic has been discussed before. How about a new thread? How about this. If I wanted to add a couple of ranks to a 4/18 Wurlitzer, what would be some good choices. I know, a stop list would help here, but I don't have one with me right now. Maybe later. I'm thinking of adding a 2nd Tibia, maybe Gottfried pipes, and a harmonic Tuba. Suggestions?   Keith    
(back) Subject: Rescheduled Recital From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 00:56:03 -0400   To Tom Gregory, best wishes on your upcoming recital, I heard that Skinner/Moller at the OHS Milwaukee Convention in 1989 and liked it a lot. Mr. William Hansen was visiting New England and came along on the Worcester Chapter AGO Fall Crawl yesterday to Hartford CT which I conducted. A very congenial and interesting person, enjoyed his presence. And we had a great day. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: NJ, Phantom of the Opera, Lee Erwin organ accompaniment From: Diaphone32@aol.com Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 01:11:15 EDT   Silent Film Classic =93PHANTOM OF THE OPERA=94 starring Lon Chaney, Sr. with Live Organ Accompaniment by LEE ERWIN   WHAT: Special Halloween treat original 1925 silent film classic =09 =93PHANTOM OF THE OPERA=94 with Live Organ Accompaniment by LEE ERWIN   WHEN: SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1998 - 3:00 PM   WHERE: BROOK THEATRE - Hamilton Street, Bound Brook, NJ   WHO: Garden State Theatre Organ Society   TICKETS: $7.00 Adults; $5.00 Seniors, Children and GSTOS Members   WHY: =09To have fun and to benefit GSTOS theatre organ installation projec= ts   PHANTOM INFORMATION: 800-788-1100   EMAIL: brook@theatreorgan.com   WEB & DIRECTIONS: http://members.aol.com/gstorgs/index.htm