PipeChat Digest #572 - Thursday, October 29, 1998
 
Re: More Dutch
  by <t.lammers@Fontys.nl>
Re: Dutch Organ Sites
  by <t.lammers@Fontys.nl>
Re: More Dutch
  by "Cheryl" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Frech classic registrations
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Frech classic registrations
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Service List - All Saints' Day
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
looking for help
  by "liontool" <liontool@concentric.net>
Re: looking for help
  by "Steven L. Egler" <Steven.Egler@cmich.edu>
RE: Service List - All Saints' Day
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #571 - 10/29/98
  by "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org>
Re: Phantom of the Pipes
  by "Greg McAusland" <gregorymca@pavilion.co.uk>
Re: Phantom of the Pipes
  by "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: BOG
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
FWD: AP Story on Church Organists
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Phantom of the Pipes
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
RE: BUD
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: FWD: AP Story on Church Organists
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: BUD
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Hallowe'en and Saint Nicholas
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: BUD
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: More Dutch From: t.lammers@Fontys.nl Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 16:20:22 +0000     > I lived in the Netherlands for about seven years and worked very hard at > learning the language. It was most discouraging to go to the bakery and order > some rolls (broodjes) and be asked in almost unaccented English "and how many > will that be, sir?"   Dutch people have learned to adapt themselves to surrounding countries: Germany, France and England. English is an obliged subject at high school.     > > If you want to start a rousing argument in Holland, ask any group of two or > more Nederlanders if, with all thoses words in Dutch that end in "en" whether > the final "n" is pronounced!   In the middle/eastern part of the country they don't pronounce the 'e' in 'en' but pronounce the 'n' strongly! In some parts they don't pronounce the 'r' in all words.....   > > Finally, as soon as you think you have a good grasp of spoken Dutch, take a > little trip to Maastricht.   Most dutch people don't understand Maastricht language too.....     -=T.Lammers=- t.lammers@fontys.nl   Fontys Hogescholen PO Box 347 5600 AH Eindhoven Netherlands +31 40 260 5401  
(back) Subject: Re: Dutch Organ Sites From: t.lammers@Fontys.nl Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 16:20:22 +0000   Here are two more:   www.qstone.nl/orgelland (dutch organ site) www.jsbach.org/index.html (bach site with MANY links)   greetings,   Tom   -=T.Lammers=- t.lammers@fontys.nl   Fontys Hogescholen PO Box 347 5600 AH Eindhoven Netherlands +31 40 260 5401  
(back) Subject: Re: More Dutch From: Cheryl <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 16:18:36 +0000     >> Finally, as soon as you think you have a good grasp of spoken Dutch, take a >> little trip to Maastricht. > >Most dutch people don't understand Maastricht language too.....   That explains a lot, if you live within the European Union, and Britain in particular - we suffer under the Maastricht Treaty, which is a most unhelpful and expensive piece of bureaucracy, IMNSHO!   :-)   Cheryl     Copeman Hart & Company Ltd http://www.copemanhart.co.uk        
(back) Subject: Frech classic registrations From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 08:38:21 -0800   Somebody posted a question on one of the lists about this ... no, I'm not gonna write an essay ... you can read "The Language of the French Classic Organ" by Fenner Douglass (Yale Univ. Press) for that ... but it might be useful to post a summary of the most common combinations (and mistakes).   First of all, to my knowledge, NONE of the French editions have it even CLOSE to right as far as the registrations are concerned. Guilmant registers for the Cavaille-Coll; Schola Cantorum and Lyre Bird (can't remember the French) register for ???   Most common mistake: drawing a 16' stop in the Pedal. They didn't exist. The few organs where the Resonance manual (with 16' stops) also furnished the Pedal stops were the exception, not the rule. French Pedal organs had four stops: Flute 8', Flute 4', Trompette 8', Clairon 4'. In addition, if you look at most of the music, drawing a 16' stop in the Pedal creates false inversions of the chords. The cantus firmus in the tenor was played on the Pedal.   On American organs, it may be necessary to add Principals 8 and 4 to the Pedal, and/or couple down the Swell Trumpet and Clarion to get enough sound for the cantus firmus.   Plein Jeu - Bourdon or Principal 16, Principals 8-4-2-Mixture(s) Grand Plein Jeu - the narrow-scale choruses of the Grand Orgue and Positif, coupled   Cornet - Bourdon 8, Principal 4, (wide-scale) Nazard 2 2/3, 2' FLUTE (not principal), (wide-scale) 1 3/5 Tierce drawn separately, AND the Cornet, if you have one   Jeu de Tierce - same as the "decomposed" Cornet (the ranks drawn separately), above, possibly without the Cornet itself. Large organs included the 5 1/3 Double Nazard and 3 1/5 Double Tierce on the G.O., and the (wide-scale) 1 1/3 Larigot on the Positif.   Grand Jeu - Bourdon 8, Principal 4, (wide-scale) Nazard 2 2/3, 2' FLUTE (not principal), (wide-scale) 1 3/5 Tierce, AND the Cornet, if you have one, Trompette 8' Clairon 4' (on the G.O.), Cromorne 8' (on the Positif), Hautbois 8' (on the Recit or Echo).   Recits de Trompette, Cromorne, Voix Humaine, etc. usually added the 8' Bourdon (and possibly the 4' Principal) to the reed stop.   Where there is a separate Pedal line in the softer pieces, it was played on an 8' Flute.   Now, here's something I'm not clear on: had the pairing of 8' open and stopped or chimney flutes already appeared?   Regards,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Frech classic registrations From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 10:34:35 -0800       Robert Horton wrote:   > A few minor problems in these lists, but otherwise, an excellent summary. > Thank you Bud!   Points well taken, Robert!   > At 08:38 AM 10/29/98 -0800, Bud wrote: > >Cornet - Bourdon 8, Principal 4, (wide-scale) Nazard 2 2/3, 2' FLUTE > >(not principal), (wide-scale) 1 3/5 Tierce drawn separately, AND the > >Cornet, if you have one   > This gets into the difference between the "decomposee" and the "separee" > cornets. > If the music asks for a Cornet "decomposee", then the composer intended it > to be played on the Grand Orgue where the Cornet was on separate drawknobs. > Cornet "separee" refers to the Recit Cornet that was tubed off from the > main chest, way up in the top of the organ (hence the term...separated), > and started at tenor F.   I was under the impression (perhaps mistaken) that the G.O. (at least) possessed BOTH the decomposee Cornet on separate knobs AND the mounted Cornet (on one knob), the latter usually being the more fiery of the two.   > >Jeu de Tierce - same as the "decomposed" Cornet (the ranks drawn > >separately), above, possibly without the Cornet itself. Large organs > >included the 5 1/3 Double Nazard and 3 1/5 Double Tierce on the G.O., > >and the (wide-scale) 1 1/3 Larigot on the Positif.   > The "double" mutations were reserved for the "Gross Jeulx de Tierce", > often used for the left hand part in Duos. The first time you hear a Gross > Tierce played in the bass it sounds downright atonal to hear that perfect > third sticking out. > > >Grand Jeu - Bourdon 8, Principal 4, (wide-scale) Nazard 2 2/3, 2' FLUTE > >(not principal), (wide-scale) 1 3/5 Tierce, AND the Cornet, if you have > >one, Trompette 8' Clairon 4' (on the G.O.), Cromorne 8' (on the > >Positif), Hautbois 8' (on the Recit or Echo).   > You've forgotten the best part of the Grand Jeulx!...The "tremblant a vent > perdu", or Tremblant Fort! These original French Classic organs had not > one, but two trems...fort et doux. The Tremblant Fort was extremely noisy > (Hermann Schlicker would be proud), fast, and deep. The sound of a huge > chorus of Trompettes et Clairons blazing away on the tremblant fort is > enough to make even the most die-hard Wurlitzer fan blush.   > I knew about it, but I wasn't gonna TELL (grin)!   > (snip)   > Here's a question for you...How, where, and when did the "Clairon" become > the "Clarion"? Is it just one of those spelling things that organ builders > do every now and then, or is there some distinction in the two terms?   I was writing half in French and half in English ... "clairon" when speaking of a French organ, and "clarion" when speaking of an American organ ... of COURSE there are VAST differences in SOUND, that being the justification for mixing languages on American draw-knobs ... if it's SPELLED "clairon", it's supposed to SOUND like a "clairon" (theoretically).   (snip)   Anybody wanna tackle the application of notes inegales?   Regards,   Bud Clark    
(back) Subject: Service List - All Saints' Day From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 11:01:00 -0800   St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church 1723 Westcliff Drive (entrance off Sherington Place, in the rear of Westcliff Plaza) Newport Beach CA USA phone: 949-646-1152 for directions   Sung Mass at 10:15 a.m. 1928 Book of Common Prayer / American Missal / 1940 Hymnal   Voluntary - Gaudeamus - Titcomb Proper - Gaudeamus - Gregorian Chant and fauxbourdons Ordinary - Willan in D (St. Mary Magdalen) Anthem - Let Us Now Praise Famous Men - Vaughn Williams Voluntary - "Little" Prelude and Fugue in B Flat - Bach   Pro - For All The Saints (Sine nomine) Ser - Let Saints On Earth In Concert Sing (Dundee) Com - Lo! What A Cloud Of Witnesses (St. Flavian) Rec - Ye Watchers And Ye Holy Ones (Vigiles et sancti)   The Rev'd Stephen C. Scarlett, Rector Bud Clark, Choirmaster and Organist    
(back) Subject: looking for help From: liontool <liontool@concentric.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 13:02:37 -0600   Hello! I am a newly-registered member, in need of help. I have just agreed to perform Gerald Near's "Suite for Organ" at an organ dedication service on November 15th. However, I can't locate my score and was wondering if anyone has a copy of it. It appears to be out of print, and my time is running out! Thank you, Paul Doerrfeld  
(back) Subject: Re: looking for help From: "Steven L. Egler" <Steven.Egler@cmich.edu> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 14:22:11 +0000   I have a copy. What do you want to do?   Steven Egler -- ***************************** Steven Egler Professor of Music (Organ) School of Music Central Michigan University Phone: 517.774.3326 Fax: 517.774.3766 *****************************  
(back) Subject: RE: Service List - All Saints' Day From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 14:52:43 -0500   Bud:   Thank you for your talk on French Organ registration. For many students that can be a most confusing and treacherous subject.   I would like to remind many of the readers that the AGO has materials available about registration for a relatively minimal cost.   I would also like to thank Bud for his posting of the All Saints Service program. It would be interesting to have have our members here share resources and suggestions for service music. I always love to get new ideas.   Dr. Charles Brown clmoney@cybernex.net   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Bud > Sent: Thursday, October 29, 1998 2:01 PM > To: organchat@onelist.com; pipechat; PIPORG-L@CNSIBM.ALBANY.EDU > Subject: Service List - All Saints' Day > > > St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church > 1723 Westcliff Drive > (entrance off Sherington Place, in the rear of Westcliff Plaza) > Newport Beach CA USA > phone: 949-646-1152 for directions > > Sung Mass at 10:15 a.m. > 1928 Book of Common Prayer / American Missal / 1940 Hymnal > > Voluntary - Gaudeamus - Titcomb > Proper - Gaudeamus - Gregorian Chant and fauxbourdons > Ordinary - Willan in D (St. Mary Magdalen) > Anthem - Let Us Now Praise Famous Men - Vaughn Williams > Voluntary - "Little" Prelude and Fugue in B Flat - Bach > > Pro - For All The Saints (Sine nomine) > Ser - Let Saints On Earth In Concert Sing (Dundee) > Com - Lo! What A Cloud Of Witnesses (St. Flavian) > Rec - Ye Watchers And Ye Holy Ones (Vigiles et sancti) > > The Rev'd Stephen C. Scarlett, Rector > Bud Clark, Choirmaster and Organist > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #571 - 10/29/98 From: "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 20:19:26 -0000   off topic I know, but everyone should know about this   > >SUBJECT: PHONE SCAM > > > > I received a telephone call from an individual > > identifying himself as an AT&T Service Technician who was > >conducting a test on our telephone lines. He stated that to > >complete the test we should touch nine (9), zero (0), the pound > >sign (#) and then hang up. > > > > Luckily, we were suspicious and refused. Upon contacting the > >telephone Company we were informed that by pushing 90# you give > >the requesting individual full access to your telephone line, which > >allows them to place a long distance telephone calls billed to your > >home phone number. We were further informed that this scam has > >been originating from many of the local jails and prisons. I have > >also verified this information with UCB Telecomm. > > > > Please beware. This sounds like an Urban Legend - IT IS NOT!!! > > I further called GTE Security this morning and verified that this > is > > definitely possible. DO NOT press 90# for ANYONE. The GTE > Security > > department requested that I share this information with EVERYONE > >I KNOW!!! > > Could you PLEASE pass this on. If you have mailing lists and/or > > newsletters from organizations you are connected with, I encourage > >you to pass on this information. > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Phantom of the Pipes From: "Greg McAusland" <gregorymca@pavilion.co.uk> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 20:34:05 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_0008_01BE037B.79530FE0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I am surprised any church is indulging in such a non-Christian activity = as Halloween. I am not a party pooper or a Christian prude or zealot, = but to participate in such activity is surely contrary to good wholesome = Christian teaching in any church denomination. Fine, let the kids go = trick or treating, but for a church to celebrate 'evil' in this way, to = me is beyond comprehension.   Big Organpipe Greg (BOG)   ------=_NextPart_000_0008_01BE037B.79530FE0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 = http-equiv=3DContent-Type> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000><FONT size=3D3>I am surprised <STRONG>any = </STRONG>church=20 is indulging in such a non-Christian activity as Halloween.&nbsp; I am = not a=20 party pooper or a Christian prude or zealot, but to participate in such = activity=20 is surely contrary to good wholesome Christian teaching in any church=20 denomination.&nbsp; Fine, let the kids go trick or treating, but for a = church to=20 celebrate 'evil' in this way, to me is beyond = comprehension.</FONT></FONT><FONT=20 size=3D3></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000><FONT size=3D3></FONT></FONT><FONT=20 size=3D3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 face=3D"" size=3D3>Big Organpipe Greg=20 (BOG)</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_0008_01BE037B.79530FE0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Phantom of the Pipes From: "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 17:25:33 -0800   Well, Greg, I disagree with you. Sure, there are devil worshipers out there, and cults who practice all kinds of perverted stuff they call religion. However the ordinary Christian Church who puts on a Halloween Carnival, or the sort of program Bonnie Beth described, could hardly be described as "celebrating evil". What better place for kids to be on Halloween than at church? One place parents can rest assured the entertainment will be wholesome and their kids safe. My own feeling is that to most American families, Halloween is a time of fun - dressing up in costume, trick or treating, carving pumpkins, etc. The overtones of evil from days past are fading away, which is all to the good. Karen  
(back) Subject: Re: BOG From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 16:41:26 -0500   Hi. I totally agree with you. Churches and Halloween--an oximoron. Just like , let the kids believe in Santa Clause, right? Parents and churches see no harm in this wayward thinking.    
(back) Subject: FWD: AP Story on Church Organists From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 15:07:44 -0800   This appeared on the PipeOrgan newsgroup ... thought y'all might find it interesting.   Bud     >From Associated Press (date unknown!)   PITTSBURGH -- In the beginning, just about every church in America had an organ and an organist, making music that filled the sanctuaries, stirred the soul and uplifted the spirit.   "Rock of Ages." "How Great Thou Art." Leading the human voice in song was the power and substance of an organ.   Not so now.   "I tell preachers, 'If you've got a good organist, chain him to the bench,'" said pipe organ builder and restorer Harry J. Ebert of Pittsburgh.   A good guess is that at least half of the country's 255,000 churches, cathedrals and synagogues have some kind of organ, said Barbara Mansfield of the American Guild of Organists   in New York.   The trouble is finding someone to play it.   Some churches are so desperate for an organist that they will recruit a pianist to play the organ, Mansfield said.   But pianists are also getting hard to come by, and, more significantly, the two instruments just aren't the same. A piano requires only two hands. An organ requires two hands, two feet and a knowledge of all those buttons and knobs that change the tone and texture of a piece of music.   "And you may be directing a choir with one hand in the air," adds Ann Labounsky, head of the organ department at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. "You simply cannot learn the organ in 10 easy lessons. It takes a tremendous amount of coordination."   Labounsky has seen her department shrink steadily over the past three decades, but it still ranks as one of the country's largest even with only 25 undergraduate and graduate students.   Nationwide, about 600 university students are enrolled in organ programs, according to the National Assn. of Schools of Music in Reston, Va. Some, like Duquesne, even discount tuition by half if a student plays in a church.   Concurrently, organ sales have plummeted from a peak of 222,000 in 1977 to an all-time low of 17,500 in 1995, according to the National Assn. of Music Merchants.   What that translates into is a real change in the way people worship.   In Bucyrus, Kan., the only church in town has an organ but no organist. There's a piano but not always someone to play it.   "So we sing without. We improvise," said the Rev. Larry Buss, minister of the United Methodist Church of Bucyrus.   In Gibsonia, Pa., Deer Creek United Presbyterian Church has been looking   for an organist for several months and hasn't had a nibble, said the Rev. Byron McElroy.   "Organists just seem to be in short supply," he said. "And trained organists are looking for a full-time position, which we can't afford."   In Dupont, Wash., the Rev. Paul Naumann uses computer-generated music to   accompany worshipers at Ascension Lutheran Church. At key intervals in the service, Naumann presses a remote on-off switch that turns on "a big fancy boom box."   It's better, he said, than singing with no accompaniment. "The thought of holding an a cappella service is a terrible one for many pastors," he said. "Many would try anything than resort to that."   But many churches have spent big money on their organs -- tens of thousands of dollars for a plain electronic model up to $2 million for a magnificent pipe organ. Churches are not willing to mothball such a huge investment.   And, perhaps more significantly, music draws church members.   "If we don't get an organist or if they want $250 a week or something, we'll have to start piping in music on a tape recorder. And that might ruin the church," said Bob Petrick of Rosedale Methodist Church in Penn Hills, Pa.   Petrick's church has an organist now, but as in many other churches, the   musician is elderly and wants to quit.   "Bob wants to see me up there playing when I'm 80," said organist Walt Hendershot, who's now 70 and tendered his resignation at Rosedale starting in September.   Hendershot, a retired accountant, has been playing the organ in church since 1952. He makes about $115 a week, which includes up to five hours a week of choir rehearsal, three or four weeks practicing the anthems and hymns and an hour for the actual service.   But the worst part of the job, Hendershot said, is that he has to find his own replacement when he wants a day off.   Even when churches are offering a full-time job with salary of $30,000 and the chance to play a new $500,000 pipe organ -- as in the case of Ingomar United Methodist Church in suburban Pittsburgh -- applicants are hard to find. "I thought that in a city the size of Pittsburgh, it would be no big deal to find an organist," said Sally Johnson, chairwoman of the music committee at Ingomar Methodist. "We didn't have one young person apply."   Organist Gretchen Franz, 50, of suburban Pittsburgh, understands why young people aren't interested in the organ:   Churches don't pay enough Organists suffer a lot of burnout   "I am always on call," said Franz, who earns $30,000 a year as full-time   organist and music director of Mount Lebanon Methodist Church. "I've never worked less than six days a week, and if there's a funeral on the seventh day, well, you work that too."          
(back) Subject: Re: Phantom of the Pipes From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 18:08:35 EST     In a message dated 10.29.98 4:16:46 PM, karencl@worldnet.att.net writes:   <<The overtones of evil from days past are fading away, which is all to the good.>>   Karen, I certainly agree with you all the way. "Fading away," though, was too mild even in the 1940s when I was a kid and we had our Hallowe'en parties at church. So I'd go farther, and say, "just plain faded away long ago."   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan  
(back) Subject: RE: BUD From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 18:36:41 -0500   I agree, Bud. Some churches even have a MIDI playback to supply music for services that someone recorded earlier.. In our country church, the pastors wife plays organ, and an elders wife plays piano. Am putting in a 4-rank Wicks there, by the way.    
(back) Subject: Re: FWD: AP Story on Church Organists From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 18:05:42 -0600   At 03:07 PM 10/29/98 -0800, you wrote: >This appeared on the PipeOrgan newsgroup ... thought y'all might find it >interesting. >>From Associated Press (date unknown!) Actually, this was back in the fall of '97, if memory serves. I first read it in the Providence Journal while home over winter break.   RH  
(back) Subject: Re: BUD From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 16:13:17 -0800       VEAGUE wrote:   > I agree, Bud. Some churches even have a MIDI playback to supply music for > services that someone recorded earlier.. In our country church, the pastors > wife plays organ, and an elders wife plays piano. Am putting in a 4-rank > Wicks there, by the way. >   My church got ALL excited when they discovered that I could record my Communion Voluntary in the MIDI and play it back while the choir and I received the Sacrament. It was necessary to point out to them that (1) our digital Hammond/Suzuki Model 825 (EEEWWW!!!) has a very primitive system ... it will only record one selection at a time, and you can't stop and start it without going back to the beginning; (2) I still have to BE there at SOME point in order to record the music (I usually do it on Saturday, or if I don't, I play the Voluntary at the early Mass and record it, and play it back at the High Mass); and (3) you can't pre-record the accompaniments to Anglican or Gregorian Chant. So much for replacing me with a digital "barrel organ" ... SOME members of the Vestry were CRESTFALLEN (grin).   I AM mystified (somewhat) at the dearth of competent amateur organists, though .... I grew up in the Deep South in the '40s and '50s ... every young lady of taste and refinement took piano lessons, and there were still enough "pump organs" in Sunday school rooms that they played those too. It wasn't so great a jump from there to the 7-rank Estey in the church. I was something of an anomaly ... a 9-year-old boy who'd rather play Lorenz voluntaries than baseball .... but I survived by becoming a championship water skiier (back when dinosaurs roamed the fertile plain). At least some of the larger posts in the city churches WERE held by men.   Anyway ... every church had an organ (pipe or reed) and an organist; and the Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran ones could find their way through the Liturgy.   I was blessed with a piano teacher who was also organist at St. David's Episcopal Church in Lakeland, FL, playing an ENORMOUS two-manual Estey reed organ. We started at hymn #1 in the 1940 Hymnal and didn't stop until we got to the end of the Fourth Communion Service in the back of the book. That was on the PIANO ... then we went to the organ and repeated the process ... solo out the soprano, solo out the tenor, solo out the soprano in the PEDALS, transpose the whole business to ANY key, and then improvise a modulation from there to the key of the Doxology, etc. etc. etc.   Forty years later, it's still FUN ... and it SHOULD be. Yeah, I get irritated with the earnest young Rector; yeah, I hope I'll LIVE long enough to see the pipe organ in the new church; yeah, the only tenor in the choir always picks the most inopportune times to disappear; but it's STILL fun.   Regards,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Hallowe'en and Saint Nicholas From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 19:22:13 EST     In a message dated 10.29.98 4:41:55 PM, dutchorgan@svs.net writes:   <<I totally agree with you. Churches and Halloween--an oximoron. Just   like , let the kids believe in Santa Clause, right? Parents and churches   see no harm in this wayward thinking>>   Gee, last year on St. Nicholas' Day we had a member who's a professional actor dressed up in full bishop's regalia playing the part of St. Nicholas: came up the aisle after the benediction and entranced everyone by telling his story in five minutes . . . up to Sinter Klaas (sp?), Santa Claus, Father Christmas and all the baloney. But it neatly separated history from myth from spiritual reality.   The same can be done with All Saints' Day: there's the baloney, the Celtic stuff, and bobbing for apples and the spiderwebs--but there's the reality of the communion of saints! Seems like an ideal teaching occasion--and not like the fundie tendency to put up a haunted house in the parish hall just to scare the kids into not smoking and playing with themselves or somebody else--which is yet another perversion of Christianity.   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan      
(back) Subject: Re: BUD From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 17:02:38 -0800   At 04:13 PM 10/29/98 -0800, Bud wrote: It was necessary to point out to them that (1) our digital >Hammond/Suzuki Model 825 (EEEWWW!!!) has a very primitive system<snip>   We over on the HamTech list want to know about your older 825. What does the voicing sound like?   DeserTBoB