PipeChat Digest #525 - Saturday, September 19, 1998
 
Re: Shrine news (VERY important...)
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Shrine news (VERY important...)
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Practice Technique - Part 1
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!!
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!!
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Shrine news (VERY important...)
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Practice Technique - Part 1
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!!
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Demise of Willis and Hill Norman & Beard
  by "Richard F. Weber" <rweber@Aero.net>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!!
  by "Nelson and Tracy Denton" <ndenton434@bigwave.ca>
Hedman Auction Afterglow tomorrow?
  by <JCarington@aol.com>
RE: Demise of Willis and Hill Norman & Beard
  by "Bruce Fletcher" <yck44@dial.pipex.com>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is coming!!!
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Re: Practice Technique - Part 1
  by "Roger Brown" <robrown@melbpc.org.au>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is coming!!!
  by "Terry Charles" <tcorgan@gte.net>
RE: Practice Technique - Part 1
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Re: Practice Technique - Part 1
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Practice technique, Pt. 1
  by "John  M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com>
William Albright, RIP (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Karr" <sfpkarr@hotmail.com>
Re: Practice Technique - Part 1
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: What should the name be? A TO list is coming!!!
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Shrine news (VERY important...) From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 06:12:22 EDT   In a message dated 98-09-16 23:37:17 EDT, you write:   << We just received the word tonight via a telephone call from the office of Cardinal Maida of the Archdiocese of Detroit that the American Conference of Bishops has now officially designated our church as The National Shrine of the Little Flower. >>   How about an explanation of the significance of this for those of us who are clueless?   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Shrine news (VERY important...) From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 06:12:26 EDT   In a message dated 98-09-16 23:37:17 EDT, you write:   << We just received the word tonight via a telephone call from the office of Cardinal Maida of the Archdiocese of Detroit that the American Conference of Bishops has now officially designated our church as The National Shrine of the Little Flower. >>   How about an explanation of the significance of this for those of us who are clueless?   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 07:18:06 -0400   My Dear Friends:   After teaching for so long, I have decided that for the novice or learning organist strong discussion is needed on practice technique. So, with everyones indulgence, I am going to attempt to use this list to offer a internet mini-course in practice technique.   The single most important tool in studying the organ, or any instrument for that matter, is the metronome. When I studied with Fox he had a disciplined and rigourous practice technique employing the metronome.   The newer digital metronomes allow the user greater portability (most are the size of a credit card) as well as steadier time at slower speeds.   When I practice a work such as the Tocatta from Bach's Tocatta Adagio - Fugue in C major I might begin with the metronome as slow as 30 to the eight note (or slower if necessary). In some pieces I have even gone as slow as 30 to the sixteenth. At this speed, even more difficult compositions are within the shot of less experienced students.   At this speed I even practice non-keyboard movements such as stop changes and movement of the feet on the swell pedals.   The challenge, at this speed, is to make it musical. DO NOT JUST PLAY THE NOTES!!!!!   When you encounter a problem, correct it immediately.   When you can play the composition or section through twice without mistakes, advance the metronome to 32 and begin the process again. Continue this process consistently until full tempo is acheived. This process may take several weeks.   Pianist Vladimir Horowitz use to say "Slower is Faster." Most great musicians adhered to this practice technique.   My next installment I am going to talk about legato vs. stacatto.   Dr. Charles Brown clmoney@cybernex.net    
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!! From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 08:13:31 EDT   In a message dated 9/17/98 1:25:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, newgershwin@hotmail.com writes:   << NOW THE HARD PART. My responsibility is to come up with a name for this list as well as a set of rules and of course a home page. All of this will be taking place at the internet's most popular theatre organ site, THEATRE-ORGANS.COM. So if you have ANY suggestions E-MAIL them to me. >>     Could it be something like "Theatre PipeChat?" Or is the PipeChat name copyrighted?   Vicki Ceruti  
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!! From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 08:21:25 -0400   At 08:13 AM 9/18/98 EDT, you wrote: ><< NOW THE HARD PART. My responsibility is to come up with a name for > this list as well as a set of rules and of course a home page.   I would vote for soemthing simple "TO-L" or similar. I believe that one was suggested by someone yesterday and it seems to be a logical choice to me!   djb    
(back) Subject: Re: Shrine news (VERY important...) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 10:07:06 -0400 (EDT)     > We just received the word tonight via a > telephone call from the office of Cardinal > Maida of the Archdiocese of Detroit that the > American Conference of Bishops has now > officially designated our church as The > National Shrine of the Little Flower.   All well and good...       but   .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..   do you get a raise????   ;-)   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o o h o o ______________ o o g o o o s o ______________ o a o o   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     I'd be happy to have my biography be the stories of my dogs. To me, to live without dogs would mean accepting a form of blindness. --Thomas McGuane    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 10:08:56 -0400 (EDT)   Nice lesson. Is this a new course?   ARE YOU PRACTICING ON US???? ;-)   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o o h o o ______________ o o g o o o s o ______________ o a o o   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     I'd be happy to have my biography be the stories of my dogs. To me, to live without dogs would mean accepting a form of blindness. --Thomas McGuane    
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!! From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 10:15:16 -0400 (EDT)   Even though this ain't my cuppa tea.... how about   TOOBIA.whatever   Theatre Organ Only Buffs In Action   ??   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o o h o o ______________ o o g o o o s o ______________ o a o o   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     I'd be happy to have my biography be the stories of my dogs. To me, to live without dogs would mean accepting a form of blindness. --Thomas McGuane    
(back) Subject: Demise of Willis and Hill Norman & Beard From: "Richard F. Weber" <rweber@Aero.net> Date: Thu, 17 Sep 1998 21:29:01 -0700   Has anyone heard anthing about the demise of Willis and Hill, Norman & Beard?   Richard Weber   Milwaukee    
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is comming!!! From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 11:44:05 -0400   May I suggest that you keep the name as short as possible.   Forcing people to type something like. . . theoneandonlynewesttheatreorganorganistsandamatuerrestorersmailinglist@http: //www.freeyellow.com/members4/cmih/page2.html every time they wished to send a message or tell a friend about it would be a royal pain.   to-l@theatreorgans.com or something short like that would be best   - Nelson E. Denton --- The Pipe Organ Tracker Project, The worlds largest collection of organ related links - http://www.freeyellow.com/members/radentonson & C.M.I.H. http://www.freeyellow.com/members4/cmih      
(back) Subject: Hedman Auction Afterglow tomorrow? From: JCarington@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 13:25:10 EDT   Hi everybody.   Guess everyone that's someone in the organ world is planning on attending the Hedman auction in South Bend tomorrow. We've all been e-mailing back and forth with "I'll be wearing this hat" or "I'll be driving this truck" in hopes that we can meet and put faces with screen names.   As for me, I'll be wearing a light blue "Schwans" uniform shirt and maybe a Schwans hat, too. On the right pec it says "John" and on the left it has a patch that says "Schwans Delicious Ice Cream." In addition to that, I am extremely tall with a close-cut flattop and goatee. I should be easy to spot. Feel free to introduce yourself.   I was thinking of having an informal evening afterglow for those heading west or southwest after the auction. My venerable analog Lowrey H-25-3 Symphonic Theatre Organ will feature an open console. I am located near Lake Michigan, along US 12, minutes from I-65, I-94, I-90, I-80 and US 20. If I decide to do this, I will hand out directions at the auction.   Look forward to seeing you all tomorrow. BTW, It's supposed to be in the mid- eighties and humid.   John Carington Chesterton, Indiana  
(back) Subject: RE: Demise of Willis and Hill Norman & Beard From: "Bruce Fletcher" <yck44@dial.pipex.com> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 19:15:34 +0100   Have not heard anything - web site still active at http://www.willis-organs.demon.co.uk/ and addresses/phones in directory http://1212.com/musical/manufuk/org/home.html are   HENRY WILLIS & SONS Ltd 87-89-91 Rushes Road, Petersfield, Hants GU32 3AT TEL : (44) 01730 263 141 / FAX : (44) 01730 262 151 Pipe organs.   HILL, NORMAN & BEARD Manor Works, Orange Street, Thaxted, Great Dunmow, Essex CM6 2LH TEL : (44) 01371 830 338 - 830 827 / FAX : (44) 01371 831 225   Regards, Bruce Fletcher, BSc, Organist & Choirmaster, St Nicholas Parish Church, Ashchurch, Tewkesbury, United Kingdom yck44@dial.pipex.com http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/park/yck44    
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is coming!!! From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 19:02:15 -0400   Short, and theatre organ specific could be:   MightyWur-L   Stan Lowkis  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: robrown@melbpc.org.au (Roger Brown) Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 23:51:15 GMT   On Fri, 18 Sep 1998 07:18:06 -0400, "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> wrote:     > >When you can play the composition or section through twice without = mistakes, >advance the metronome to 32 and begin the process again. Continue this >process consistently until full tempo is acheived. This process may take >several weeks. > Charles, I would take the view that you need to go into it a little more. As I see it, the danger of what you have written is that the student may adopt inappropriate fingerings which work well enough at the slow speed but would not stand up to the pressure under full speed conditions. So it's a question of how large you make the sections to be practised and how quickly you build those up to something like full speed. =20 =20 As you know, considerations like this are the reason why many teachers suggest that some attempt be made to play through the piece at something approaching full speed first. I've always thought that not to be a practical approach for most students. To me the key is to make the "chunks" fairly small and to practise them frequently enough to bring them up to closer to full speed relatively quickly. Essentially this means that you practise a little more intensively in order to approach normal speed for shorter sections of the piece. =20 =20 I doubt if I am saying anything you would disagree with but I feel the point. needs to be more clearly made in a "mini course" such as you intend. And may I say it's an excellent idea. =20 =20 Personally I'm not so particularly thrilled about worrying too much about building registration and swell pedal movements in at too early a stage although that obviously depends on the level of the student. =20 =20 To some extent I would prefer to see an organ student start on a relatively simple (and preferably tracker) instrument where "fussing with the stops" is not necessary. Let them build up a solid keyboard technique first! But certainly at a later stage what you propose is perfectly appropriate. =20 =20 I look forward to reading further instalments. =20 =20 Best regards =20   =20 Roger =20 =20   Roger Brown robrown@melbpc.org.au http://members.tripod.com/~RogerBrown  
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is coming!!! From: "Terry Charles" <tcorgan@gte.net> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 20:32:51 -0500   Hi Stan,   Question - do you know what type wood Wurlitzer made their shutters of?   Thanks - all the best,   Terry    
(back) Subject: RE: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 20:40:24 -0400   Hello!!!   I was happy to see the positive responses to my "mini-course" on practice technique. One person wrote back about his learning the Widor Tocatta.   That is the ideal composition. When I first learned it I started at 50 to the 16th note. Of course, at that tempo, it took me about an hour to play it thorugh. The speed built quickly however and I had it up to tempo in about 2 weeks.   The Widor Tocatta is not a difficult work musically. It is, however, a technical endurance test. The slower practice will aid in building up stamina to sustain it.   In response to Roger Brown (no relationship that I know of) he brings up some good points. But, it has always bothered me that orchestration techniques such as stop changes, swell pedal manipulations, etc. must be practiced right from the beginning. My resoning is as follows:   First, these things are not ornaments to the music but an intregal part of the performance of any composition on the organ. Too many times I have heard organist make a stop change sound like a seek-and-destroy mission. Fox went as far as to make the stop change or swell movement on the appropriate beat. Everything moved like a carefully choreographed ballet. That is why he was able to do some the things that he did.   Second, the stop changes and swell movements can govern the fingering and pedaling. It may require taking some notes with one hand, etc.   The overall result is a much smoother performance and a greater ability to adapt to a different instrument.   With regard to fingering, I know of very few cases in which the fingering at one tempo would be different than the fingering at another. But the slow practice permits us to easily adjust and adapt.   Well, happy to get the feedback   Dr. Charles Brown clmoney@cybernex.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 21:02:55 -0400 (EDT)   I enjoyed reading Charles Brown's first practice installment. I have always told my students: practice slowly, learn fast. I even occasionally use a fugue played slowly on a lone Rohrflote as a prelude; it can be quite haunting and lovely, and it helps train the nerves at the same time as the fingers and the brain. Even though I am one who prefers to do all registration by hand I don't learn this along with the piece. My reasoning for this is so that the piece can be played on any organ without having to unlearn registration movements. When the piece is well under the fingers it is usually not difficult to incorporate registration changes. As I am learning the piece, however, I do begin to form a concept of registration so that the sounds and textures I want are learned into the piece. In this way I am able to play literature without writing registration changes. The only time I write down registrations is when I'm playing on an unfamiliar instrument, and that is only the starting registration. Metronome practice has always been a favorite activity of mine, and I have always encouraged my students to develop this as well. As an aside, I recall a 12 year old piano student who dutifully purchased a metronome when she began studying with me. She was a good student and progressed well. One day she brought her metronome in to her lesson and asked where she could send it to have it fixed. I asked what the problem was and she simply said, "it just won't go." I asked, "how does it feel when you wind it up?" She replied, "wind it up?" She had had the metronome for TWO YEARS and it had just run down!!   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o o h o o ______________ o o g o o o s o ______________ o a o o   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     If the old dog barks he gives counsel. --George Herbert    
(back) Subject: Practice technique, Pt. 1 From: "John M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 21:38:43 -0000   I am pleased to see this discussion and Dr. Brown brings up a good point. I tell my students to go through it once at a decent tempo to discover the sections that need work - and work on those. It is better to practice one page 5 times than 5 pages once. Don't waste time on sections that are easy, but work hard and slowly on parts that are difficult. And the metronome does keep you at a reasonable learning speed.   John Doney        
(back) Subject: William Albright, RIP (X-posted) From: "Stephen Karr" <sfpkarr@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 22:59:46 EDT   Greetings, lists-   No, I'm not making it up. My organ professor (Robert Parris) called me Friday at 3:30 PM, after having gotten off of the phone with Karen McFarlane, to tell me that William Albright died of liver and heart problems (he wasn't very specific) on the evening of September 17. We were in the preliminary stages of arranging for him to come play a recital here on the Holtkamp organ (vintage 1984) in the University chapel/recital hall. I was looking forward to it, and am disappointed that he will not be contributing to organ literature anymore.   I have also begun learning his Organbook III in preparation for the AGO competitions coming up soon next year. I hope you don't all see me as opportunistic, but any of you who have connections to the "in-crowd" at AGO, I'd like to know if I can go on and finish the piece and compete with it in the summer, or if I have to start on another.   Hope all is going well,   -Stephen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 23:55:40 -0500   At 11:51 PM 9/18/98 +0000, you wrote: >more. As I see it, the danger of what you have written is that the >student may adopt inappropriate fingerings which work well enough at >the slow speed but would not stand up to the pressure under full speed >conditions. Agreed, slow practicing is valuable ONLY after you've gone through and decided on fingerings that feel comfortable at speed. I've found that the best way to do this is to take one hand alone almost up to tempo and decide on fingerings and then write them in. Once the fingerings are down on paper, then you can dial back the metronome without worrying about forgetting which finger to use.   >As you know, considerations like this are the reason why many teachers >suggest that some attempt be made to play through the piece at >something approaching full speed first. If you've chosen repertoire that's at the student's level and that they enjoy, the tough part is usually keeping them from diving in at full speed.   >To some extent I would prefer to see an organ student start on a >relatively simple (and preferably tracker) instrument where "fussing >with the stops" is not necessary. Let them build up a solid keyboard >technique first! But certainly at a later stage what you propose is >perfectly appropriate. I usually insist on a basic keyboard technique when I start a student (though I've worked with people who are at the "Every Good Boy..." level), so my goal is to work on expanding and adding to that technique. I've started students hitting divisional pistons and making registration changes as early as the second lesson. You have to estimate the student right to avoid overwhelming them, but give them as much as they can. I suppose I'd be a little frustrated if I felt that my teacher wasn't telling me what all those buttons did because they're "too advanced".   >I look forward to reading further instalments. Likewise.     Robert C. Horton Associate Minister of Music, St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center Rm.970 McCollum Hall, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Strasse/1028/   "It takes a great artist to play a simple melody" - Edwin H. Lemare  
(back) Subject: Re: What should the name be? A TO list is coming!!! From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Sat, 19 Sep 1998 01:11:56 -0400   Terry Charles wrote: > > Hi Stan, > > Question - do you know what type wood Wurlitzer > made their shutters of? > > Thanks - all the best, > > Terry >   I don't know what kind of wood, but the few that I have seen have looked SWELL. Hopefully this question will produce a high volume of answers, but I may be soft-pedaling this.   Stan