PipeChat Digest #527 - Sunday, September 20, 1998
 
RE: Practice Technique - Part 2B
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Hedman Auction BARGAINS: Wurlitzer pipeorg: $65!!!!
  by <JCarington@aol.com>
Re: Practice Technique Part 2A
  by "Roger Brown" <robrown@melbpc.org.au>
Re: Practice Technique - Part 2B
  by "Roger Brown" <robrown@melbpc.org.au>
Re: Hedman Auction BARGAINS: Wurlitzer pipeorg: $65!!!!
  by "Jim H" <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: Practice Technique Part 2A
  by "Jim H" <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: Practice Technique
  by "Jim H" <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: Practice Technique - Part 1
  by <MickBerg@aol.com>
Re: Demise of Willis and Hill Norman & Beard
  by "Vincent Lef vre" <vlefevere@unicall.be>
John Giacchi in Concert
  by "Ian B. McLean" <SoloTibia@bigpond.com>
 


(back) Subject: RE: Practice Technique - Part 2B From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Sat, 19 Sep 1998 23:31:13 -0400   Roger:   Your point is well taken and, of course, the techniques used by the very beginning student would be different than for the organist preparing for a recital. It is to that later person I am addressing many of these techniques.   When I do master classes I am apalled by how many students at so-called advanced levels let important details slide by or fail to understand the music much beyond the notes.   In discussing the stop changes however it is important to remember that the stop changes and mechanics is just as much part of the composition as the notes themselves and should be practiced in the same light.   In terms of hands practicing seperately my response is yes, sometimes this is needed. But, ultimately we have to bring them together at a slow speed.   Good points you bring out.   Charles   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Roger Brown > Sent: Saturday, September 19, 1998 11:18 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 2B > > > On Sat, 19 Sep 1998 22:34:51 -0400, "Charles Brown" > <clmoney@cybernex.net> wrote: > > > >First of all, from a practice standpoint, what happens if the fingerings > >learned at tempo A do not work at tempo B? > > Which is precisely the point I made earlier - one which I think > perhaps Dr Brown slightly misunderstood. > > > >Practicing is not a linear process but, in many instances, highly > >regressive. In the process of increasing tempo, if something breaks-down > >then we did not have the proper fingerings to begin with and we > need to go > >back to tempo A and revise it. > > > Agreed. But I also feel part of the solution is to practise in > relatively small "chunks". In a trio sonata for example I would > usually want to practise in sections of perhaps only three or four > bars and then relatively quickly bring those up to a more normal > speed. > > This brings me to another interesting point which I see others have > mentioned. Do you practise separate hands (or separate hands and > pedal) or do you attempt to combine both hands and feet from the > beginning albeit at slow speed. > > I must say that in general I favour the latter approach because it > forces the player to address one of the fundamental playing > difficulties from the start. And as Dr Brown rightly states, if one > has mastered such a difficulty at slow speed then the job is mostly > done for any speed. > > > >The next question is what happens if we have to perform on an organ that > >does not lend itself to the vision we have in mind. > > And again, this brings out one of the reservations I have concerning > building registration matters into a students slow practice. I am here > especially considering a student in the relatively early years of > learning the instrument. > > Is such a student better to devote his or her energies to acquiring > the fundamentals of keyboard and pedal technique without the > distractions of registration? Or should they learn to fend for > themselves at the console from the start? > > Dr Brown is absolutely correct that at some stage any worthwhile > player must learn the art of smooth registration and that detailed > practice of the sort he postulates is the only possible way to acquire > such skills. But I would suggest that this is better left until the > later stages of student development when the student can concentrate > on that aspect without being unduly distracted by the physical demands > of keyboard and pedal technique. It's not a question of whether it > should be done but at what stage. > > And I am sure that most of us have found that once the tricks of the > trade are acquired, these skills can readily be adapted to a variety > of situations, instruments and acoustic surroundings. > > > Roger > > > > > Roger Brown > robrown@melbpc.org.au > http://members.tripod.com/~RogerBrown > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Hedman Auction BARGAINS: Wurlitzer pipeorg: $65!!!! From: JCarington@aol.com Date: Sat, 19 Sep 1998 23:41:13 EDT   Well the Hedman auction is over and wow were there some BARGAINS.   The show-stopper was a 4-rank Wurlitzer with chests (including a Salicional) and a 2hp blower, in crates, and in excellent shape, that sold for a whopping $65. Later in the day it was discovered that there was an $850 reserve, but the guy argued and was able to keep it for the original $65 bid. I don't know who he was, but he had a southern accent.   The X-66 Hammond had a $4,000 reserve and the bidding only got up to $3,800. A clean B-3 and Leslie fetched $3,800. A newer Hammond spinet (with that pesky "chip" from the Commodore or whatever somehow snagged $900. Most other organs, including some Conns, an Allen 3-manual church organ, Lowreys, Baldwins etc. couldn't even get opening bids of $25. It was spooky at times. With all the advertising on the internet etc., there were only 80 or so registered buyers to start with.   Actually, someone bought the 3-manual Allen, but all they took was the speaker cabinets. They left the console.   Leslies averaged $100 or so, and a semi-trailer full of tone cabinets and monstrous Rodgers and Conn pipe-chamber speakers only brought prices of about $10 apiece!!!   I saw a lot of dealers there running Leslie prices up into the thousands for some models. I saw Leslie guru Harv Olsen among the bidders.   Lee Maloney was part of my contingent of Internet theatre organ types. He bought a beautiful, flawless Gulbransen Rialto II (with both tabs and drawbars) in flawless mechanical shape. (We played it for a good 4 or 5 hours and couldn't find ANYTHING wrong with it). He managed to pick it up for a mere $500.   As for me, I broke with Lowrey tradition and bought not only my FIRST Hammond, but also my SECOND. I bought a Model E chapel console Hammond for $110 and a Model H for $150. (Can u believe???) They both work great, have excellent furniture and came with benches and original owners manuals AND brochures. The Model E will go in the Dining room and the Model H will go in the spare bedroom. Look out Jerrell Kautz!!!   Lee and I bought several sets of Conn pipes; we cleaned them out on all sizes, silver and gold, for a mere $30 APIECE.   A Conn 640 and another Conn theatre organ, (which both worked), couldn't get starting bids of $5!!!!!   Afterwards, Lee, Dennis Scott, (who got a vanload of Leslies for under $100 total) a couple of others and I celebrated with an e-afterglow and an organ styling symposium on my venerable Lowrey Symphonic Theatre Console.   I managed to capture the event on video, for posteriority.   It sure was fun! I'm glad I went.   John Carington Chesterton, Indiana  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique Part 2A From: robrown@melbpc.org.au (Roger Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 03:42:15 GMT   On Sat, 19 Sep 1998 15:29:35 -0400, "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> wrote:   >All this must take place BEFORE practice begins. You MUST have this = mapped >out carefully in your mind as the product you are hoping to produce. = Your >statement about this work!!!!!   Surely that must depend on the maturity and skill of the student concerned.For a mature developed artist Dr Brown's concept is perfectly correct. But for a student such an expectation may be quite unrealistic. =20 =20 So far as organ is concerned, I was a mature age student (I started in my twenties). And I had a very wise teacher who allowed me to play in my style (very different from HIS style) and simply concentrated on smoothing out the many rough edges. So yes, I certainly tried to do as Dr Brown suggests. =20 But my childhood piano lesson days were very different - obviously I had not then developed the musical perception skills that I acquired in maturity. And therefore it clearly would have been quite unrealistic to expect me, at that earlier time, to have any cogent concept of the music I was learning.=20   It was the task of my teacher to provide that guidance and, been in due course, to foster and develop my ability to understand such stylistic and musical considerations. =20     =20   Roger Brown robrown@melbpc.org.au http://members.tripod.com/~RogerBrown  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 2B From: robrown@melbpc.org.au (Roger Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 03:54:22 GMT   On Sat, 19 Sep 1998 23:31:13 -0400, "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> wrote:   >When I do master classes I am apalled by how many students at so-called >advanced levels let important details slide by or fail to understand the >music much beyond the notes. Of course one other aspect of this is that quite a different view is, of necessity, taken by players in the European tradition. =20 =20 I recently had a visit from a European organ student (and a very good player) who in general appeared to rely almost entirely on registration assistants for stop changes etc. He seemed, though he is an excellent player, relatively uncomfortable with the sort of registration changes we of the English speaking traditions seem to take for granted. =20 =20 In discussing this, he simply made the point that that was the tradition in which he had been trained and that in most cases the sort of instruments he would be expected to play would necessitate such registration assistants simply by their layout. =20 =20 (Having said as I would love to think I could do as well with a European style pedal board as the did with the (for him) totally unfamiliar radiating and concave variety!) =20 =20 It does all depends on your perspective doesn't it? =20     Roger     =20   Roger Brown robrown@melbpc.org.au http://members.tripod.com/~RogerBrown  
(back) Subject: Re: Hedman Auction BARGAINS: Wurlitzer pipeorg: $65!!!! From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 23 Aug 1998 08:25:05 -0500   JCarington@aol.com wrote: > > Big Snip     Hey John,   Do you know if they still have the Allen console? Also, could you get me the address of the auction company? I must have let this one slip by me. Thanks,   Jim H. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique Part 2A From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 23 Aug 1998 08:11:10 -0500   Charles Brown wrote: > >Big Snip > > We practice just to develop the technical tools necessary to bring out our > vision of sound. It distresses me to no end when I hear someone make > technique the goal. Technique is not the end but only the means to the > end!!!! > > Big Snip   > This is the difference between an artist and someone who plays an > instrument. > > > Unfortunately, though Dr. Brown, there are too many teachers who only teach technique and get sorely distressed if their pupils even hint at straying from the written page. I would encourage those pupils to not get so stuck on technique and the mechanics of music that they cannot make music. (The forest for the trees thing) I would also encourage teachers to emphasize music for the sake of musical enjoyment and less like an assembly line production.   Jim H. > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 23 Aug 1998 08:16:13 -0500   bruce cornely wrote: > > > > The secret is to WANT to learn something! >   There you said it.   Jim H. > .......................bruce cornely........................ > o o o o ______________ o o o o > o h o o ______________ o o g o > o o s o ______________ o a o o > > ............ cremona84000@webtv.net ............ > > If the old dog barks he gives counsel. --George Herbert > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique - Part 1 From: MickBerg@aol.com Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 03:04:57 EDT   Great post! Thankyou so much! More please! Mick Berg.  
(back) Subject: Re: Demise of Willis and Hill Norman & Beard From: "Vincent Lefèvre" <vlefevere@unicall.be> Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 10:12:55 +0200       To all list users:   Organ Music Composition Contest =AB Price Jan Vermulst =BB   The "Foundation Jan Vermulst" is planning an international organ composit= ion contest for composers born between 1.1.1950 and 31.12.1969. The composition must be 10 to 12 minutes in length. The score is to be hand-written and playable on any organ of medium size and not bound to a specific instrument.   Registration instructions should be moderate. All registrations are to b= e given in common Italian terminology, so as to guarantee the anonymity of = the composer. Published works (or works submitted for publication) are not admissible. The winning composition will be played during the organ con= cert series in the Abbey of Berne in Heeswijk (Netherlands) in 1999.   The international jury is composed of: - Dr. Mathieu Dijker (president), organist and composer (N) - Prof. Chris Dubois, organist and composer (B) - Prof. Zsigmund Szathmdry, organist and composer (G)   The decision of the jury will be final. The jury reserves the right to m= ake no award in the event that the quality is not suitable. All participants will be informed if this is the case.   Deadline for Submission: January 1, 1999 Compositions should be sent to: Stichting Jan Vermulst, Aarle-Rixtelsewe= g 54, 5707 GM Helmond, Netherlands Tel/fax 31(0)492 527695 E-mail: jmvanham@iaehv.nl   Include one original and two photocopies of the composition. Identify t= he work with a pseudonym or motto. Include an envelope with name, address a= nd phone number plus your pseudonym or motto. This envelope will not be transmitted to the jury. Your identity document, showing clearly the dat= e of birth, will also not be transmitted to the judges.   One prize of 10.000 fl will be awarded by the Foundation. The winner wil= l be personally informed. All other scores will be returned. The results wil= l be sent to the media before April 1, 1999.   This information is given by: Organs in Flanders non profit association -= V. Lef=E8vre, secretary (vlefevere@unicall.ba)        
(back) Subject: John Giacchi in Concert From: "Ian B. McLean" <SoloTibia@bigpond.com> Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 18:17:48 +1000   Just got back from listening to Giancarlo Giacchi giving of his all at the Orion 3/18 Wurlitzer in Sydney.   John managed to make some wonderful sounds on this instrument in a concert which was of truly international standard. The program was a mixture of standards, orchestral transcriptions and 'mood' music. All numbers were delivered with confidence, and aplomb. The orchestral numbers including the Overture to the Barber of Seville, demonstrated superb dynamic shadings, and registration contrasts that added to music.   John played his statement Busby Berkely selection as a memorial to the late Mal MacInnes of Perth, and delivered some George Wright arrangements with startling authenticity and effect. The "Rose Marie" selection being a crowd pleaser as well.   Also included in this concert were some of the more obscure 'mood' pieces, often penned by ex-theatre organists of yore. These and a number by Billy Mayerl were politely received by the audience even though they were played with verve and supreme control. Indeed, the excellence and sensitivity of what was going on was lost on the audience in these numbers. I wonder if less of these types of compositions, and some more of those known to the audience would have made for a better over all impact for them? Not for me, but for the general audience. Or does it really matter? I think that it does.   The audience comparison between this concert and that which I heard of Ray Thornley's on the same instrument a few weeks previously, was quite dramatic. Ray played crowd pleasers in just a purely competent manner. He included only very few non main stream numbers. That noticeably larger audience clamoured for many encores. John's for only two. Although John did take the console down thereby limiting the audience's options. But, still, the reality was not lost on me.   Here we had a world class concert played by someone who know the Orion instrument intimately, whereas Ray does not have this intimacy with this instrument. Or, indeed any other theatre pipe organ. Yet, it was Ray that achieved the greater commercial success for TOSA, and also the more positive audience reaction. Personally, I would much prefer to listen to John's concert today. However "bums on seats" as John Fuhrmann of Perth, so often and correctly points out, is the only key to survival.   Musically, this was an excellent and eminently satisfying concert for this concert goer, with none of the continuity problems of John's Adelaide performance on the two manual Pulteney Grammar instrument at Easter. In discussion with Bill Schumacher, we agreed that it was most probably the lack of a modern combination action at Pulteney that may have caused those problems. Those problems were no where in evidence today. Indeed, it was almost implausible to consider that this was a concert from the same artist that played last Easter.   Organists like John Giacchi, who I consider to be in a similar class to the exquisite Jelani Eddington, need the support of those who appreciate the 'finer' (I can think of no better word) elements of modern theatre pipe organ performance. These two organists belong in the company of the likes of Gledhill, Baker, Strojny, Williams, Nordwall, etc. In these days where so many artforms are becoming the prisoner of the lowest common denominator, it behoves those of us who appreciate what these organists can achieve to get out and pay to hear them so that promoters can not just look at them in any jaundiced commercial perspective.   If you want to hear a state of the art performance on a theatre pipe organ, then make sure that if you're near a concert of John Giacchi's that you go along! He will be touring the U.S. next April.   Ian McLean