PipeChat Digest #528 - Monday, September 21, 1998
 
RE: Practice Technique Part 2A
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Re: Practice Technique  reply
  by "pianoman" <pianoman@inlink.com>
Jesse's arranging
  by "Ralph Martin" <rmartinjr@email.msn.com>
Re: John Giacchi in Concert
  by "Ian B. McLean" <SoloTibia@bigpond.com>
Re: John Giacchi in Concert
  by "krumet" <krumet@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Jesse's arranging
  by "Ralph Martin" <rmartinjr@email.msn.com>
 


(back) Subject: RE: Practice Technique Part 2A From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 06:26:07 -0400   Roger:   Thank you for your well spoken posts. As I stateted in post 2B, this mini-post is directed toward the student well beyond the 5-finger position stage. Although the astute teacher should always encourage the beginning student in developing good habits from day 1. For the first time in many years, I am seriously thinking of taking on beginning students because of the shockingly poor quality of teaching available to students.   When I attend the entrance auditions of schools like Juilliard or Manhattan I sometimes cannot believe what I hear. Sadly, instinct is telling me that some of these students do have talent. But in order to bring that talent out, a teacher must take that student back to the beginning, throw everything out, and start over again.   It can be very demoralizing for the student to suddenly discover that 10 years worth of work was probably a big and expensive waste of time. They come in trying to play a Beethoven sonata and end up back in Bastien - Level 1.   Just since I started these post I have had several private emails with students telling me that there teachers never discuss these topics with them. Sadly, almost anyone can call themselves a music teacher and unsuspecting and/or uncaring parents fail to question anything.   I hate to speak ill of anyone but there is one teacher I know of located in the Binghamton/Ithica NY area that I would personally like choke the life out of. Not only is he a poor teacher of the highest order but he is arrogant about it. In one case he had a student on Thompson Book 6 and that student did not know how to count the most basic of rhythms. I have since taken that student under wing and virtually had to start her back at book 1 this is a quarter note stage. Happily, she is progressing quite well and is showing a great deal of promise.   Well....Part 3 later about articulation later   Dr. Charles E. Brown   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Roger Brown > Sent: Saturday, September 19, 1998 11:42 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Practice Technique Part 2A > > > On Sat, 19 Sep 1998 15:29:35 -0400, "Charles Brown" > <clmoney@cybernex.net> wrote: > > >All this must take place BEFORE practice begins. You MUST have > this mapped > >out carefully in your mind as the product you are hoping to produce. Your > >statement about this work!!!!! > > Surely that must depend on the maturity and skill of the student > concerned.For a mature developed artist Dr Brown's concept is > perfectly correct. But for a student such an expectation may be quite > unrealistic. > > So far as organ is concerned, I was a mature age student (I started in > my twenties). And I had a very wise teacher who allowed me to play in > my style (very different from HIS style) and simply concentrated on > smoothing out the many rough edges. So yes, I certainly tried to do as > Dr Brown suggests. > > But my childhood piano lesson days were very different - obviously I > had not then developed the musical perception skills that I acquired > in maturity. And therefore it clearly would have been quite > unrealistic to expect me, at that earlier time, to have any cogent > concept of the music I was learning. > > It was the task of my teacher to provide that guidance and, been in > due course, to foster and develop my ability to understand such > stylistic and musical considerations. > > > > > Roger Brown > robrown@melbpc.org.au > http://members.tripod.com/~RogerBrown > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Technique reply From: "pianoman" <pianoman@inlink.com> Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 06:48:20 -0500   Hi Charles, just him aside. If you worked with Paul M. for many years how can you call him a Beetle and not a Beatle? :>) James Grebe R.P.T. of the P.T.G. St. Louis, MO. Competent Service since 1962 Do what is right and do no harm Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups and Practical Piano Peripherals   pianoman@inlink.com   ---------- > From: Charles Brown <clmoney@cybernex.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: RE: Practice Technique > Date: Saturday, September 19, 1998 8:50 PM > > Karl: > > The technique you are using is called visualization. I know it has to do > with sound but it still comes under that category. > > Please keep in mind that many of our greatest jazz and pop musicians are > musically illiterate. > > I have worked many times with former Beetle Paul McCartney. He is now > writing more serious works. Interestingly enough, he knows nothing about > reading or writing music and requires associates to transcribe what is is > singing and playing into musical notation. Visualization is a powerful > technique and, in many ways, the most important technique you can learn > > Dr. Charles E. Brown > clmoney@cybernex.net > > > > -----Original Message----- > > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > > KARL W KELLER > > Sent: Saturday, September 19, 1998 8:35 PM > > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > > Subject: Practice Technique > > > > > > I have been following, with great interest, the above subject. It would > > appear to me that majority of the members who have been replying are > > either teachers of organ or at least very well trained organists. I have > > a question which I would like to your opinion on. I, as many others, > > have very little formal music training but I have taught myself to play > > the organ well enough that others compliment me on my playing and seem to > > enjoy it. I read music but not well. When I am working on a piece it > > helps me to be able to HEAR it before I try it. Yes, I am imitating what > > I hear but if I didn't use this method I would be lost. My question, of > > course, is how many of you teachers, organ students, or well taught > > organists use this HEAR method ? > > > > I hope we can keep this discussion on a serious level as the subject > > "Practice Technique" is such a good one. Thank you Charles Brown. > > > > Karl > > Musica est Dei donum optimi > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Jesse's arranging From: "Ralph Martin" <rmartinjr@email.msn.com> Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 22:13:39 -0400   Hi List This is really a repeat of the original post about upside down intro's. I have acquires a computer program to actually write the music. However, in the hands of a computer iliterate like myself, it is very difficult to use. Possibly I'll develop a bit more proficiency as I go along.   Take the first four (or eight) bars of the original melody, and range permitting, raise it an octave. From this first note progress in an opposite direction of the original melody and move the same interval. If your second note goes up a minor 3rd....you go DOWN a minor 3rd, etc. You then harmonize your intro as your taste demands. Jesse harmonized this intro with voice-led dominant 9th's. This means the pedal plays the root and your left hand is playing: 3rd-b7th-9th, third voice through first (left to right) These structures were used an awful lot by Jesse. Sometimes he would re-harmonize eight straight bars with them.   The musical example, such as it is, is a jpeg file. You should be able to open it and print it. If not, I'll use a file that is convenient for the majority.   Coming next, if you are interested, is composing an intro with "echo melody"   Ralph Martin        
(back) Subject: Re: John Giacchi in Concert From: "Ian B. McLean" <SoloTibia@bigpond.com> Date: Mon, 21 Sep 1998 12:46:55 +1000     >Organists like John Giacchi, who I consider to be in a similar class to the >exquisite Jelani Eddington, need the support of those who appreciate the >'finer' (I can think of no better word) elements of modern theatre pipe >organ performance. These two organists belong in the company of the likes of >Gledhill, Baker, Strojny, Williams, Nordwall, etc.   Oops! I forgot our own Tony Fenelon. He certainly belongs in this august group.   Ian McLean      
(back) Subject: Re: John Giacchi in Concert From: "krumet" <krumet@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 20 Sep 1998 23:14:42 -0400       ---------- > From: Ian B. McLean <SoloTibia@bigpond.com>   > Oops! I forgot our own Tony Fenelon. He certainly belongs in this august > group.   ---as would John Seng and Billy Nalle, and several others!! :)   Clare  
(back) Subject: Re: Jesse's arranging From: "Ralph Martin" <rmartinjr@email.msn.com> Date: Mon, 21 Sep 1998 00:36:39 -0400   Hi Just found out from the administrator of pipechat that attachments cannot be used.   Anyone finding a musical example necessary contact me privately and I will get it out to you.   Ralph Martin