PipeChat Digest #790 - Sunday, April 11, 1999
 
Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Easter preludes and postludes
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Richard Purvis Toccata
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Russian Bass Technique
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Silly Low Stops!
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "antoni scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden
  by "Robert  Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Hector Olivera, Rochester and Wurlitzer. (cross-posted)
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Re: Russian Bass Technique
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: Russian Bass Technique
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "Matt Baker" <poinsettia@netxn.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 09:33:55 -0400 (EDT)     >I play this piece with 8'-4' flutes coupled and at > a not too fast tempo ... it has more beauty to > me that way than by playing it with a lot of > stops. Jason It is beautiful music, no matter how it is played; it just does not say "Easter" to me! Try playing it on a meantone or other unequally tempered organ. Then all that gnashing around harmony really takes on exquisite beauty (in Ordinary Time, of course hehehe).   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   J'embrasse mon chien sur la bouche! --from a sweatshirt (in preparation for OHS Montreal)    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter preludes and postludes From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 09:38:08 -0400 (EDT)   Have I every thought of reading the words?   Of course. The words are beautiful. But ya don't play the words. I will say (for the last time) that the music just doesn't portray the glory of Easter for me. I dutifully played this every Easter for years, until several choir members said "The music today was so glorious. Why the dirge at the end?" It made me think, and I played it again and listened again, and thought, "why, dang it, their right!" There are just too many really exciting pieces of music that portray Easter more clearly.   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   J'embrasse mon chien sur la bouche! --from a sweatshirt (in preparation for OHS Montreal)    
(back) Subject: Re: Richard Purvis Toccata From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 08:47:36 -0500   No, N Brown, I am afraid Richard Purvis is playing a celestial organ now.   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 07:20:51 -0700       >Subject: Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden   ><< I play this piece with 8'-4' flutes coupled and at a not too fast tempo ... > it has more beauty to me that way than by playing it with a lot of stops. > >> > >What??? No reeds??? HMMMM.... > >John > >Try it, there's a gentle and moving quality to the piece played that way. You'd be surprised.   Jason  
(back) Subject: Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 11:07:17 EDT   In a message dated 4/10/99 9:25:57 AM Central Daylight Time, jason@johannus-norcal.com writes:   << Try it, there's a gentle and moving quality to the piece played that way. You'd be surprised. >>   I'll give it a whirl and get back to ya Jason.     John  
(back) Subject: Re: Russian Bass Technique From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 18:15:23 +0100   >I know this is not on topic, but does anyone here know a Russian bass >vocal technique used to achieve the lowest singable octave of the bass >range. I think it starts with a "C". > > > >Thanks >Robert Eversman >Mineral Point Wi >     A friend of mine at school just goes "paaa" and sing ridiculously low notes. When he has just got over the flu he can get 3 g's below middle c!!!   Richard. =========================================================   This message was sent to you by Richard Pinel. rpinel@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk   He's not stupid; he's possessed by a retarded ghost    
(back) Subject: Silly Low Stops! From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 18:21:44 +0100   Hi All,   This is probably a stupid question, but is there such thing as a 128' stop (I know that it would have to be resultant). Terry Pratchet refers to one (only in a joke) in one of his "Discworld" books (as 128 foot Earthquake!).   Richard. =========================================================   This message was sent to you by Richard Pinel. rpinel@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk   A man who steals his neighbor's wife is not alone      
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: antoni scott <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 13:30:27 -0400   Hi Richard:   I have a 128' Stop on my Digital organ. It is a 32' Bombarde transposed down two octaves.   Antoni scott   Richard Pinel wrote: > > Hi All, > > This is probably a stupid question, but is there such thing as a 128' stop > (I know that it would have to be resultant). Terry Pratchet refers to one > (only in a joke) in one of his "Discworld" books (as 128 foot Earthquake!). > > Richard. > ========================================================= > > This message was sent to you by Richard Pinel. > rpinel@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk > > A man who steals his neighbor's wife is not alone > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 13:07:45 -0500   I play this with both soft and loud registrations depending on the occasion. When using softer registrations I employ a legato pedal line and quite the opposite when using a bolder registration. It is a beautiful piece of music and this is a good example of how registration and tempo can be varied on the same piece with amazing results. Robert.   Fear not, we still love you Bruce :)   ---------- From: bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Christ lag in Todesbanden Date: Saturday, April 10, 1999 8:33 AM     >I play this piece with 8'-4' flutes coupled and at > a not too fast tempo ... it has more beauty to > me that way than by playing it with a lot of > stops. Jason It is beautiful music, no matter how it is played; it just does not say "Easter" to me! Try playing it on a meantone or other unequally tempered organ. Then all that gnashing around harmony really takes on exquisite beauty (in Ordinary Time, of course hehehe).   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   J'embrasse mon chien sur la bouche! --from a sweatshirt (in preparation for OHS Montreal)     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 14:33:17 -0400   antoni scott wrote: > > Hi Richard: > > I have a 128' Stop on my Digital organ. It is a 32' Bombarde transposed > down two octaves. > > Antoni scott > > Richard Pinel wrote: > > > > Hi All, > > > > This is probably a stupid question, but is there such thing as a 128' stop > > (I know that it would have to be resultant). Terry Pratchet refers to one > > (only in a joke) in one of his "Discworld" books (as 128 foot Earthquake!). >     ....You can't hear it but the manufacturer has a little indicator light on the console that blinks 4 times a second. ....For an extra thousand dollars they can make it blink 2 times a second. :) Stan  
(back) Subject: Hector Olivera, Rochester and Wurlitzer. (cross-posted) From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 15:47:41 -0400   A week from tonight will be the Hector Olivera theater pipe organ event that marks the first time in history that the Rochester Theater Organ Society and the Rochester Chapter of the American Guild of Organists join together to produce a really special event.   Hector Olivera will present a program that features both theater organ pop favorites and traditional classical organ pieces on the Auditorium Center Wurlitzer 4/22 theater pipe organ. This outstanding program will start at 8 p.m. on next Saturday, April 17th.   The Auditorium Center is located at 875 East Main St. in Rochester, NY. Public ticket prices are $18 for preferred seating and $15 for general admission. The Box Office will open at 6 p.m. on the 17th.   Concert details, driving directions, group price and student price information can be found at http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ or by private e-mail to kevans1@rochester.rr.com . This rare appearance by Hector Olivera at a theater pipe organ console will mark Hector's 7th presentation for RTOS and his first for the Rochester Chapter of the AGO.   Those who have heard Hector Olivera know that this will be one of this year's most outstanding theater pipe organ events. Hector will be displaying his superb keyboard talent on one of the finest theater pipe organs in the world. We hope to that you will join us for this celebration of exciting entertainment.   Ken Evans, Director, Rochester Theater Organ Society, Inc.      
(back) Subject: Re: Russian Bass Technique From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 15:44:22 -0400   Yeah, the Russian bass starts at 'cello C, 2 octaves below middle c', and just goes on down. Is there a special technique? I've known several singers who can get down to at least AA. Not a whole lot of volume, but it sure does add resonance. In the Mahler 8th symphony, there's a place where the men are divisi a 8, and the second basses go down to BBb. I sang in it once in the National Cathedral- out of about 120 basses in the choir, there were about 15 who had the note- and that was plenty! Choral notes that low don't have to be loud to be felt, but they warm up the sound immensely. I remember a similar trick, also at the Cathedral. We were doing the Bernstein Chichester Psalms, in the version with organ (back on topic, somehow!), harp, and percussion. The last note of the piece has the chorus holding a G with a slow trumpet line (played on an trompette with the box closed, as I recall), otherwise unaccompanied, except that the organist put down GG on a soft 32' alone. The pedal note was inaudible by itself, but it made the chorus sound absolutely ravishing. I don't even remember if it was on this list, but someone made a similar observation about 32' reeds- it's not so much what they sound like by themselves, but how they make everything else sound.   Paul Opel   >>I know this is not on topic, but does anyone here know a Russian bass >>vocal technique used to achieve the lowest singable octave of the bass >>range. I think it starts with a "C". >> >> >> >>Thanks >>Robert Eversman >>Mineral Point Wi   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: Russian Bass Technique From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 22:46:14 -0400 (EDT)   Is that where the term "flue" pipes came from? LOL --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1999 22:47:49 -0400 (EDT)   Antoni, Is there pitch? Is it audible? or is it just "thunderous"? --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: Matt Baker <poinsettia@netxn.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 00:40:21 -0700   The lowest notes on a full-length 128' stop when used by itself would be inaudible as a tone, as the lowest C would only be about 4Hz (try playing around with a function generator hooked up to a stereo with big speakers), but I'd think they'd influence other higher-pitched stops the same way a 64' does, or at least they do when I experiment with MIDIs. A while back I posted on a digital organ I'm building. It'll have two 128' stops, but they'll just be full-length 64' rank shifted over an octave with lowest-12-resultant and mainly be for getting that 64' super-low when playing the highest notes on the pedalboard. This reminds me of an experiment somebody told me about where a really big trumpet-of-sorts that sounded at 4Hz and 2Hz was demonstrated at a convention--supposedly it caused pain for everybody when sounded!   Richard Pinel wrote:   > Hi All, > > This is probably a stupid question, but is there such thing as a 128' stop > (I know that it would have to be resultant). Terry Pratchet refers to one > (only in a joke) in one of his "Discworld" books (as 128 foot Earthquake!). > > Richard.   -- < Transmit src: poinsettia@netxn.com ID1 LCARS Channel 1 Lineout > <YuSeEkMeAtNo31101993 http://www.netxn.com/~poinsettia/index.html>