PipeChat Digest #791 - Sunday, April 11, 1999
 
Andy Kasparian at the Kimball in Kingston, Ontario
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl>
unknown organ
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Wanted
  by "jon" <jonberts@swbell.net>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "antoni scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: LeMare's Andantino
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Allen reeds in Widor V -cherrypicker in the church
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
128' Pedal Stops (stop list)
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl>
Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "Richard L. Allen" <rleeallen@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net>
Fw: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
MEDINAH TEMPLE AUSTIN/Chicag0 (X-POSTED)
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: unknown organ
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Silly Low Stops!
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem
  by "John  M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com>
My latest brainstorm
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Andy Kasparian at the Kimball in Kingston, Ontario From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 05:36:20 -0400   Last Friday evening the Kingston Theatre Organ Society had the immense pleasure of having the New Jersey Theatre Organist Andy Kasparian play for us at the Kimball in the Church of the Redeemer here in Kingston.   His concert was really good, and he has a command of our instrument that makes most of us feel "Gee, i wish I could do that!". He is quite the showman, and titivated the audience with is little comments between each number. All "Show" tunes, nothing at all classical, but I, and the reat of the almost Full House, thoroughly enjoyed his presentation.   Thanks go to the performer, the KTOS, and the Church of the Redeemer for giving us such a fine evening.   I see on the Web that he is performing in Tonawanda NY in June, - go to it if you like a fun evening.   Bob Conway            
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: Aida van de Brake <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 14:13:40 +0200   Hi Everyone,   "Richard Pinel" wrote: > > Hi All, > > This is probably a stupid question, but is there such thing as a 128' stop > (I know that it would have to be resultant). Terry Pratchet refers to one > (only in a joke) in one of his "Discworld" books (as 128 foot Earthquake!). > > Richard. >   I once ran into a stop called Gravississima 128' or something like that. I think it was in Bela-Russia, in a place called Velichestvennosk. It also might have been it's in neighbour town Pyshnostograd. I'm sure I should have the complete specs of this organ lying somewhere. I've been looking for it, but so far no good. I'll let you know if I find it.   Cheers,   Aida.  
(back) Subject: unknown organ From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 08:08:57 -0500   Hi List... I recently ran across an old instrument dating from 1720. It is a single manual, slide - in keyboard tracker. Three ranks - metal principal, Rhor folte, and wood flute. It has no pedalboard. The case is mahogany, and measures 6' wide, 35+ACI-deep with manual slid in, and 11' high. It has 8 stops, four on each side of the keydesk. The instrument is now in an ancient northern Indiana Catholic parish. It came up from Kentucky in the 1840's by ox- cart, then by canal to the parish church. No name is visible anywhere on the outside, but perhaps some neat clue will be found in its' innards. Church records prove the dates accurate. The instrument of course needs restoration, but is in surprisingly good condition. Recent dates pencilled in by the various organ pumpers go back to the '40's. It IS hand pumped. One elderly gentleman I chatted with sang the mass to it in the '40's. Tradgedy struck when some kids got into the casework, removed all the metal pipes and flattened them all to pancakes. The voicing is 1 to 1-1/2 inches. The pumps raise a little pressure, but the poor thing wheezes like heck. The organ strongly resembles an English chamber instrument with a definite German/English builders' influence. It has three towers on the case, with half-round carved wood fascade pipes. I'm working on a restoration contract, and will keep you all posted as to its' progress.   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net http://www.svs.net/Dutch Cuckoo clocks make great wedding gifts      
(back) Subject: Wanted From: jon <jonberts@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 08:31:35 -0500   Hi all.....sorry to post here, but with so many on the list. We need 16 Laukhuff manual key contact block assemblies. Old style (not plastic) with either 6 or 8 contact points. If any would have available, please reply privately. Thanks.   Jon Bertschinger Temple Organs    
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: antoni scott <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 11:31:08 -0400   Hi Neil:   It was a joke. The 128' pitch is inaudible. My digital organ has the capability, so I tried it. All you hear is a "tapping" sound, four times a second. In a real pipe organ I would consider it an expensive draft.     Antoni scott   N Brown wrote: > > Antoni, Is there pitch? Is it audible? or is it just "thunderous"? > --Neil > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 12:04:16 EDT   Hi List-- Yes,,a joke indeed <G> 128', Hmmmmm. I think a good analogy would be to quickly blow out 4 short breaths each second,,and you would have an idea of what it might sound like. :-) I have NO idea, however, how long the pipe might take to come onto speech :-), and stabilize.:-) What kind of cut-up would be needed?, do the usual formulae apply? Hmmmm, food for thought! :-)   Cheers, ---Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: LeMare's Andantino From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 15:07:20 EDT   In a message dated 99-04-07 01:46:14 EDT, you write:   << wo questions; 1 Can anyone tell me where to get the sheet music and a good recording of E.H. LeMare's "Andantino in D-flat" (later to become "Moonlight and Roses"?) >> Try contacting Wayne Leupold Editions. He has re-published quite a lot of Lemare's original compositions (Origianlly published by Stott/G.Schirmer) otherwise, it is also published in an old AMSCo Collection of organ pieces. I copied mine out of the music library at U. Va., but there ought to be a 'legit' source for this piece somewhere.   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Allen reeds in Widor V -cherrypicker in the church From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 15:07:24 EDT   You might try checking with your local (larger) machine shop, perhaps one that also does machine rigging. they might have a cissors-lift that will fit thru a 36" door that will get you to where you need to go. Also check with the folks who installed the speakers to start with and find out how *they* got them up there!   good Luck   Rick Maryman  
(back) Subject: 128' Pedal Stops (stop list) From: Aida van de Brake <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 23:26:44 +0200   Hi All,   I finally found the specifications of the organ with a 128' stop on the Pedal that I was looking for. It wasn't in Belorussia but just in London. You can check it on the site of "The British Institute of Organ Studies".   http://www.bios.org.uk/npor.html   click <index> --> type "N07816" --> click <submit query>   Cheers,   Aida.   P.S. For reasons of readability I left out some of the stop names, e.g. a few over 102... <;-)         NPOR search V2.84 on Sun Apr 11 15:09:24 1999   © The British Institute of Organ Studies   London, Greater, City of London   St. Michael [N07816]   Grid ref: TQ3281 Survey date: 1975 Anglican Parish Church   Builder: Rushworth & Dreaper - rebuild     PEDAL 1 Acoustic Bass 128 2 Contra Diaphone Profunda 64 3 Acoustic Bass 64 4 Stentor Sub Tibia 32 5 Double Open Wood 32 6 Sub Principal 32 7 Sub Bourdon 32 8 Gross Quint 21 1/3 9 Major Diaphone 16 10 Diaphone 16 11 Open Wood I 16 12 Open Wood II 16 13 Open Wood III 16 14 Major Bass 16 15 Principal 16 16 Bourdon I 16 17 Bourdon II 16 18 Viole Sourdine 16 19 Viole Celeste 16 20 Diaphone Quint 10 2/3 21 Octave Diaphone 8 22 Octave Tibia 8 23 Harmonic Bombarde 64 24 Double English Horn 32 25 Major Saxophone 16 26 Stentor Bugle 8   GREAT 27 Acoustic Open Wood 32 28 Contra Tibia Clausa 16 29 Contra Viole 16 30 Gedacktpommer 16 31 Double Diapason 16 32 Diapason Phonon 8 33 Open Diapason I 8 34 Open Diapason II 8 35 Open Diapason III 8 36 Open Diapason IV 8 37 Open Diapason V 8 38 Open Diapason VI 8 39 Large Tibia 8 40 Small Tibia 8 41 Octave Phonon 4 42 Gemshorn 4 43 Flauto Maggiore 4 44 Lieblich Piccolo 2 45 Grand Grave Chorus V 46 Contra Tuba Maxima 16 47 Euphone 8 48 Post Horn 8 49 Kinura 4   SWELL 50 Contra Viole 32 51 Violone 16 52 Quintadena 16 53 Diapason 8 54 Stentor Cello 8 55 Viole 8 56 Phonon Celeste 8 57 Tibia Plena 8 58 Quintadena 8 59 Dulciana 8 60 Principal 4 61 Spindle Flauto Traverso 4 62 Gambette 2 63 Diaphonical Chalumeau 16 64 Tuba d'Amour 8 65 Trumpet 8 66 Stentor Vox Humana 8 67 Stentor Hautboy 8 68 Tremulant I 69 Tremulant II   SOLO 70 Stentor Double Diapason 16 71 Gross Diapason 8 72 Diapason 8 73 Tibia Rex 8 74 Clarabella Pomposa 8 75 Octave 4 76 Philomela 4 77 Krumette 8 78 Royal Trumpet 16 79 Imperial Tuba 8 80 Majestic Corn. Clarion 4 81 Tremulant   ORCHESTRAL 82 Double Bass 16 83 Cello I 8 84 Cello II 8 85 Violin I 8 86 Violin II 8 87 Violin III 8 88 Violin IV 8 89 Contra Bassoon 32 90 Tuba 16 91 Trombone 16 92 Bassoon 16 93 Cor Anglais 16 94 Trumpet I 8 95 Trumpet II 8 96 French Horn 8 97 Oboe 8 98 Clarinet 8 99 Flute 8 100 Ocarina 4 101 Piccolo 2 102 Bells 8   BOMBARDE 106 Grand Diap Chorus X 107 Contra Sub Tuba 32 108 Contra Tuba 16 109 Tuba 8 110 Tuba Sonora 8 111 Military Grand Ophicleide 8   Source ref: JOC No.3, 1975, p.36 Input by: EIJ Information source: JOC Corrections by electronic mail will be welcome  
(back) Subject: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 19:39:25 EDT   Dear list members:   This is a serious query, embarrassing as it may be, if anyone has the same problem and/or if you have a serious suggestion as to how to remedy it I would be greatly obliged.   The organ and console at my church is located in the rear gallery (no pun intended) and the temperature is about 10 to 15 degrees higher than it is on the nave level. Because of this temperature difference and wearing a robe I find that by the end of the service my posterior sticks to the wooden bench due to sweating through the service. This really is not fun, especially when I am playing anything which requires fast and fluid pedal action for the postlude. So thus my question is: Any suggestions as how to remedy my dilemma? Should I wax the bench?   Thanks,   Name withheld for obvious reasons  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: "Richard L. Allen" <rleeallen@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 19:41:02 -0400   Why not try sitting on a towel, many of us do that!       At 07:39 PM 4/11/1999 EDT, DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: >Dear list members: > >This is a serious query, embarrassing as it may be, if anyone has the same >problem and/or if you have a serious suggestion as to how to remedy it I >would be greatly obliged. > >The organ and console at my church is located in the rear gallery (no pun >intended) and the temperature is about 10 to 15 degrees higher than it is on >the nave level. Because of this temperature difference and wearing a robe I >find that by the end of the service my posterior sticks to the wooden bench >due to sweating through the service. This really is not fun, especially when >I am playing anything which requires fast and fluid pedal action for the >postlude. So thus my question is: Any suggestions as how to remedy my >dilemma? Should I wax the bench? > >Thanks, > >Name withheld for obvious reasons > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 20:05:53 -0400   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: > > Dear list members: > > This is a serious query, embarrassing as it may be, if anyone has the same > problem and/or if you have a serious suggestion as to how to remedy it I > would be greatly obliged. > > The organ and console at my church is located in the rear gallery (no pun > intended) and the temperature is about 10 to 15 degrees higher than it is on > the nave level. Because of this temperature difference and wearing a robe I > find that by the end of the service my posterior sticks to the wooden bench > due to sweating through the service. This really is not fun, especially when > I am playing anything which requires fast and fluid pedal action for the > postlude. So thus my question is: Any suggestions as how to remedy my > dilemma? Should I wax the bench? > > Thanks, > > Name withheld for obvious reasons >   Dear Sweatbutt: Since a Howard Seat would be out of place in a liturgical setting, and what (if anything) you wear under your robe should remain personal, I can offer but one suggestion. A terry cloth towel in an unobtrusive color could be folded and placed on the bench like a cushion.   Stan  
(back) Subject: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 20:11:44 -0400   To "unknown", don't wear a robe and/or sit on a thin pad or cushion. Why do you need a robe if you're in the rear gallery.  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 19:37:50 -0500   I have the same problem. I've found that waxing the bench and then applying a weekly coat of furniture polish does the trick! ;)   -----Original Message----- From: Richard L. Allen <rleeallen@worldnet.att.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>; pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, April 11, 1999 6:42 PM Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem     >Why not try sitting on a towel, many of us do that! > > > >At 07:39 PM 4/11/1999 EDT, DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: >>Dear list members: >> >>This is a serious query, embarrassing as it may be, if anyone has the same >>problem and/or if you have a serious suggestion as to how to remedy it I >>would be greatly obliged. >> >>The organ and console at my church is located in the rear gallery (no pun >>intended) and the temperature is about 10 to 15 degrees higher than it is on >>the nave level. Because of this temperature difference and wearing a robe I >>find that by the end of the service my posterior sticks to the wooden bench >>due to sweating through the service. This really is not fun, especially >when >>I am playing anything which requires fast and fluid pedal action for the >>postlude. So thus my question is: Any suggestions as how to remedy my >>dilemma? Should I wax the bench? >> >>Thanks, >> >>Name withheld for obvious reasons >> >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Fw: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 20:21:53 -0500   A friend of mine played in a church one HOT summer day. He wore NOTHING but the robe. At the end of a fantastic piece of music, the pastor asked him to stand and take a bow. My friend signalled "no". The pastor persisted, and my friend raised his robe a little so the pastor could "see" the reason why.   Rick Love One Another   -----Original Message----- From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, April 11, 1999 6:40 PM Subject: Embarrassing Organ related problem     >Dear list members: > >This is a serious query, embarrassing as it may be, if anyone has the same >problem and/or if you have a serious suggestion as to how to remedy it I >would be greatly obliged. > >The organ and console at my church is located in the rear gallery (no pun >intended) and the temperature is about 10 to 15 degrees higher than it is on >the nave level. Because of this temperature difference and wearing a robe I >find that by the end of the service my posterior sticks to the wooden bench >due to sweating through the service. This really is not fun, especially when >I am playing anything which requires fast and fluid pedal action for the >postlude. So thus my question is: Any suggestions as how to remedy my >dilemma? Should I wax the bench? > >Thanks, > >Name withheld for obvious reasons > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: MEDINAH TEMPLE AUSTIN/Chicag0 (X-POSTED) From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 20:31:25 -0500   This afternoon William Aylesworth presented a program on the Medinah Temple organ which could be the final organ program dependent on the fate of the venerable building. The big Austin is one of the best remaining examples of an early twentieth century romantic organ and still does well what it was designed to do, fill the huge (5000 seat) auditorium. Approximately 500 attended the program, which appeared to be a small crowd in that cavernous barn. Dr. Aylesworth's programme amply demonstrated the tonal resources of the fine organ. For my own preference I enjoy hearing an organ with large scale Diapasons, full bodied flutes and rich strings. This organ has that. The concert was presented by the Medinah Temple Association, and Dr. Aylesworth started the program with a welcome to the audience and an acknowledgment of support the program had received from the Midwest Chapter of the Organ Historical Society and the Chicago Area Theatre Organ Enthusiasts. Here is the programme:   Imperial March, Op 32 Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934) Solemn Melody Sir Henry Walford Davies (1869-1941) Ave Maria, Op. 14 Felix Alexandre Guilmant Dr. Aylesworth was joined by tenor Kurt Hansen for the Ave Maria Hymn of Thanksgiving (Te Deum) Jean Langlais (1907-1991) after a short intermission the programme continued with:   Symphonie I, Opus 14 Louis Vierne (1870-1937)   I. Prelude II. Fugue III. Pastorale IV. Allegro vivace V. Andante VI. Final   After an enthusiastic response from the audience, Kurt Hansen joined William Aylesworth for the first of two encore numbers, a different version of the Ave Maria, followed by the Toccata from Widor's Fifth Symphony.   Kurt Hansen is on the Voice Faculty of the Northwestern University and is director of music at St. Pauls United Church of Christ in Chicago. He is also an active soloist and is well-known for his oratorio performance in the United States, Europe and the Far East.   William Aylesworth is Director of Music at St. Johns Lutheran Church in Wilmette and is organist of the Scottish Rite Cathedral of Chicago and of Medinah Temple. He is an active recitalist and has distinguished himself for his recitals on historic instruments.  
(back) Subject: Re: unknown organ From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 21:56:35 -0400 (EDT)   Rick, WOW, I bet if those pipes could talk they would tell an immense history. Good luck. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Silly Low Stops! From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 21:59:22 -0400 (EDT)   Antoni: Tapping huh? Maybe someone ought to digitize (is that the word) all the creaking noises in churches and add them to a stop list somewhere. Since the room is the most important stop on an organ anyway. :) :) :) Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 22:02:01 EDT   Dear list members,   To those of you who suggested using a towel, I've had reservations regarding that... however, I will give it a shot in practice this week.   Thanks  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 21:05:21 -0500   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: > > Dear list members: > > This is a serious query, embarrassing as it may be, if anyone has the same > problem and/or if you have a serious suggestion as to how to remedy it I > would be greatly obliged. > > The organ and console at my church is located in the rear gallery (no pun > intended) and the temperature is about 10 to 15 degrees higher than it is on > the nave level. Because of this temperature difference and wearing a robe I > find that by the end of the service my posterior sticks to the wooden bench > due to sweating through the service. This really is not fun, especially when > I am playing anything which requires fast and fluid pedal action for the > postlude. So thus my question is: Any suggestions as how to remedy my > dilemma? Should I wax the bench? > > Thanks, > > Name withheld for obvious reasons   I assume that you are a woman, though it is just possible that you are a man wearing shorts. If you are a woman, try wearing a longer skirt -- e.g. a split skirt, which ought not to interfere with your pedal technique too much, or slacks or jeans. If you are a man, wear trousers or jeans. Waxing the bench will probably not make too much difference. Generally speaking it is only skin rather than cloth that sticks to organ benches under such conditions. If, however, you are weaing clothing that is sticking to the bench this would be a most unusual situation.   John.  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 22:03:35 EDT   In a message dated 4/11/99 7:34:40 PM Central Daylight Time, mahopper@bellsouth.net writes:   << I have the same problem. I've found that waxing the bench and then applying a weekly coat of furniture polish does the trick! ;) >>   Thanks Mark,   But doesn't that leave a shiny residue on the seat of your slacks?  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 22:12:48 EDT   In a message dated 4/11/99 9:06:46 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << If, however, you are weaing clothing that is sticking to the bench this would be a most unusual situation. >>   I am a man, who wears dress slacks & underwear and the robe hangs over the back of the bench and I still have a sticky situation... However, I have received a few tips that might remedy that.   Thanks,   EmbarrASSed  
(back) Subject: Re: Embarrassing Organ related problem From: "John M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 22:20:21 -0000   No, don't wax the bench. The nuns tried that once and I got on the bench from the left and was off on the right within an instant. Also when you are doing some of that pedalling, you do need a bit of friction so you can stop in the right octave.   I vote for the towel.   JOHN          
(back) Subject: My latest brainstorm From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 11 Apr 1999 22:24:48 -0400 (EDT)   Dear Friends: I had an idea over the weekend and I thought I'd share it, in case others of you want to try it sometime. All this Toccata Talk gave me the notion of having a "ToccataFest" for the month of May (except for May 30 when I'll be on vacation). The postludes of all 4 Sundays would be toccatas. I would highlight the concept to the congregation and of course ENCOURAGE them to hang around to hear. You know, a little marketing never hurts our cause any. Here are the toccatas I'm considering, not necessarily in the order: John Weaver's "Toccata for Organ"; Peter Planyavski's "Toccata alla Rumba"; Leon Boellmann's "Toccata" from Suite Gothique; haven't come up with the 4th one yet.   Am I totally insane? Neil Brown, AAGO, MMus Barnegat, NJ USA