PipeChat Digest #808 - Friday, April 23, 1999
 
Public Domain
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
(no subject)
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: Greetings
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@hit.net>
(no subject)
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: Public Domain
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
copies anyone?
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
copyrights.
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: copies anyone?
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net>
Re: copies anyone?
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
 


(back) Subject: Public Domain From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 1999 22:39:16 -0500   From an easily-found internet site about copyright (I'm using the "fair use" clause by copying this paragraph, at least as I understand "fair use")... ***************** What is a work in the public domain?   A work in the public domain can be copied freely by anyone. Such works include those of the U.S. Government and works for which the copyright has expired. Generally, for works created after 1978, the copyright lasts for fifty years beyond the life of the author. Works created before, but not published before, 1978 have special rules. For works created and first published between 1950 and 1978 the copyright lasts 75 years. For works created and first published before 1950, it lasts for 28 years but could have been renewed for another 28 years. When planning a project, start by identifying works in the public domain that can be reused in the new work. Request permissions for materials not in the public domain early in the project. It is easier to redesign a project in the beginning stages if you discover that permission to copy cannot be obtained for certain images or sounds. *******************   There is another paragraph concerning "fair use" (which many musicians try to use to illegally copy music)...one thing everyone should know is the fact that a particular piece of music being out of print does NOT automatically provide permission to go and photocopy it.   I urge everyone...if you are unsure, don't copy. Study the copyright laws and/or summaries...lots of information is available on the internet.   Rod Murrow      
(back) Subject: From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 1999 20:40:13 PDT     do w   carlo   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Greetings From: Frank Johnson <usd465@hit.net> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 1999 22:45:12 -0600   >Hello, everyone. > >I'm a "newbie" to this list. I teach music as Northwestern Oklahoma >State University in Alva, Oklahoma. I live in a very small town called >Freedom, where my wife serves as the United Methodist minister. I'm >organist at the First Presbyterian Church in Alva, playing a 1965 Reuter >of 2 manuals and 13 ranks (designed by Marilyn Mason, who played the >inaugural recital...Alva was her home and FPC was her church...and she's >returning in August for another recital, this time to celebrate the >church's centenary). > >I have a "lead" on acquiring an 8-rank organ for our home, a Moller of >mid-1950s vintage; whether that will really happen is indefinite at this >point, but it's looking better and better. It's been a life-long dream >and seems to be in reach. >     I know exactly where you are located. My wife and I are from Kiowa, Kansas. That's not far from Alva and we have been all over that area in years past. I used to play in the Northwestern Symphony in my high school days. I played clarinet when Robert Rudia (sp) conducted the orchestra. That would have been in the early 1950's. I direct the 104 year old Winfield (KS) Municipal Band. We have done a number of Ed Huckeby tunes. Right now we are doing the Overture to A New Millennium. Do you have his e-mail address? I'd really like to correspond with him. He does some really fine writting.   I am into organ and dixieland jazz also. Check our site in my signature.   Welcome to this list. I hope you find it as enjoyable as I do.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 1999 21:16:02 PDT       e people who'll think I'm nuts, but I never was a follower. I walk to the beat of my own drum and that's why I got where I am today.   Carlo   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Public Domain From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 00:28:25 -0400   Thanks Rod,   If this was in reference to my post, I was NOT going to copy. I had an extra PUBLISHED copy of the piece in question (which now has been ``snatched up'' by a lister). In or out of print - I stay out of the copy business -- too dangerous (and expensive!)   Bonnie Beth Derby Producer & Host ``Orgelwerke'' & ``Choral Traditions'' WCNY-FM, 91.3; Syracuse; WUNY-FM, 89.5, Utica; WJNY-FM, 90.9, Watertown Organist, First Church of Christ, Scientist, Syracuse orge@dreamscape.com ---------- > From: Rod Murrow > Subject: Public Domain > Date: Thursday, April 22, 1999 11:39 PM > > > There is another paragraph concerning "fair use" (which many musicians > try to use to illegally copy music)...one thing everyone should know is > the fact that a particular piece of music being out of print does NOT > automatically provide permission to go and photocopy it. > > I urge everyone...if you are unsure, don't copy. Study the copyright > laws and/or summaries...lots of information is available on the > internet. >    
(back) Subject: copies anyone? From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 1999 23:47:07 -0500   I guess if the cost of milk goes high enough, I'd buy a cow...but I wouldn't steal one from a farmer. I guess if the cost of bread goes high enough, I'd bake a loaf...but I wouldn't steal it from the grocer.   I will agree that inflation is certainly a major factor in rising prices, but I find it baffling that any active musician can believe that illegal photocopying is not one of the major causes. Of the cost of a piece of music, only a very small percentage goes to the composer; the rest goes to the publisher.   A new twist on the copyright laws came to my attention just a few weeks ago, in a local greenhouse. I bought some bedding plants for my flower beds...and there on a tag was a clear instruction: "propogation strictly prohibited." It seems that nurserymen are trying to protect their own investments via the copyright laws...if you need six of these plants, it is NOT okay to buy one and propogate five others...and it's NOT okay to take cuttings in the fall to produce plants for your next spring's garden.   Sadly, many churches and schools are the worst violators of the copyright laws; I have personally seen some music file cabinets stuffed nearly full of photocopies, and have been instructed by a previous choral director to "just buy two copies, one for me and one for you -- we'll make copies for the choir." I have also spent some time throwing illegal photocopies in the trash and urging the offending church to "follow the rules."   I agree with Carlo that we're all in this together, but I'm sorry...there ARE copyright laws against "being gracious, generous, kind and above all 'thoughtful'"--if the act of making the copies keeps the retailer and/or publisher and/or composer from receiving the money he or she is due for providing the product. Yes, I know that many people feel that way...and no, it most assuredly is not "the crime of the century." But it's contrary to the U.S. copyright laws...and people have been known to pay HUGE fines for violating those laws.   One way to be sure that a piece of music is out of print is to order a copy from the publisher. If the response is that it is indeed POP (permanently out of print), then write a letter asking permission to make a copy for your personal use. In most instances, the publisher will grant permission (and may often charge you for the privilege), but will ask you to write a "permission" statement on the photocopy...and will likely suggest that you keep the letter on file. In some cases, the publisher will themselves make a photocopy and charge you the full price...but it's a legal copy. The difference is that you paid for it and the publisher got the reward.   I inquired once about a piece of music I'd lost...and received a copy (not a photocopy, a published copy) from a friend on the internet (thanks for your similar response, Bonnie Beth Derby).   I'm not trying to make anyone angry...I just think that we all need to understand the consequences of our actions when we "shoot a copy" of a piece of music.   Taking the analogy previously made, if the cost of a piece of music goes high enough, I'm absolutely SURE that I won't buy a printing press...and I won't photocopy it (unless it's clearly and obviously in the public domain)...I'll pay for the music instead.   Rod Murrow    
(back) Subject: copyrights. From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 00:46:31 -0400 (EDT)   Carlo, sir, the law is the law. Mr. Murrow, a most appropos thread. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: copies anyone? From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 00:13:40 -0700   I photocopy the hymns for the choir to place in their folder so they do not have to carry hymnbooks in addition to the other music. These are destroyed immediately after the service... actually they are recycled for note pads for office use.   >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: copies anyone? From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 00:33:42 -0500   The church I serve has given blanket permission for their congregations to make photocopies as you describe SO LONG AS WE HAVE BOUGHT THE HYMNALS that these copies substitute for...in other words, if our choir does NOT have hymnals for each choir member, then it's against the copyright laws for us to make copies for them. It's OK only to the extent that it's an effort to "lighten their load," so to speak. That's how the pastor and the director of music understand it, so who am I (the lowly organist) to contradict them?   Rod Murrow   Sand Lawn wrote:   > I photocopy the hymns for the choir to place in their folder so they do not > have to carry hymnbooks in addition to the other music. These are destroyed > immediately after the service... actually they are recycled for note pads > for office use. > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org