PipeChat Digest #812 - Sunday, April 25, 1999
 
IMPORTANT - PLEASE READ (Was: Re: Fw: Denny Ferris)
  by "ADMINISTRATION" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Looking for a Hammond light bulb!
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Fw: The Postlude
  by "Robert  Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Re: The Postlude
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Relays & switches, reeds
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Console design....terraced knob jambs.
  by "jon" <jonberts@swbell.net>
Re: The Postlude
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
try again Re: The Postlude
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: RE: favorite organ pieces
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Fw: The Postlude
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Fw: The Postlude
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
hand-crossing
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
birth & death dates
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
FBC, Sunday, April 25...
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: FBC, Sunday, April 25...
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@hit.net>
Fw: FBC, Sunday, April 25...
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: birth & death dates
  by "John  M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com>
pipe search
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re:off topic -   bob conway
  by "Claire" <fleahopper@earthlink.net>
Re:off topic -   bob conway
  by "Ron Yost" <musik@tcsn.net>
 


(back) Subject: IMPORTANT - PLEASE READ (Was: Re: Fw: Denny Ferris) From: ADMINISTRATION <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 09:35:27 -0500   >ANOTHER VIRUS...............   I hate to have to do Administration postings but may I take this opportunity to remind the members of the list that Virus postings to the list, such as this one, are forbidden by our Guidelines.   If you feel that there is something like this that should be looked at, please send it to the Administration Account and we will check it out. If we feel that there is merit, such as there has been with the Happy99 virus, one of us will take the appropriate measures and make an announcement to the list.   Most of these are spam and end up taking on a live of their own. And the only problems they cause are a waste of bandwidth with all the excess mail that happens when they are forwarded around the Net.   Please remember, that I am a computer consultant in real life and it is one of my responsibilities to my clients to keep on top of any of these viruses. And if I were to find something I would notify the list members of its existance.   Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming!!   David     ******************************** David Scribner Co-Owner - Technical Administratior PipeChat   850-478-9635 mailto:david@blackiris.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for a Hammond light bulb! From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 12:34:53 EDT   In a message dated 4/24/99 10:49:39 PM Eastern Daylight Time, gregory@mke.earthreach.com writes:   << Is there anyone on the list that may have just one of these little bulbs available for purchase? >>   Have you tried an auto parts store?   Vicki Ceruti  
(back) Subject: Fw: The Postlude From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 14:14:48 -0500   wow, I didn't hear from anyone ! There is honestly no one in this group who has a suggestion for me ? (now be nice!) :)   help ......... !   How did this thing called the Postlude begin?   ---------- From: Robert Eversman <highnote@mhtc.net> To: PipeChat . <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: The Postlude Date: Friday, April 23, 1999 9:10 AM   I am trying to gather some history on The Postlude in Christian worship. Can anyone think of some good resources for me? Does anyone out there know anything they might be willing to share? I thought of Groves, but I am not close to a set of these venerable books.   thanks robert  
(back) Subject: Re: The Postlude From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 14:25:14 -0500   I feel badly that no one answered. I have no answer to that question, Robert, but if you want I can make up something entertaining.   Glenda Sutton     > From: Robert Eversman <highnote@mhtc.net> > wow, I didn't hear from anyone ! There is honestly no one in this group > who has a suggestion for me ? (now be nice!) :) > > help ......... ! > > How did this thing called the Postlude begin?    
(back) Subject: Re: Relays & switches, reeds From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 15:25:26 -0500   >Do you still have the three Klann gang switches available. Sincerely, Paul >P. Valtos   Yes, we do.   John V.        
(back) Subject: Console design....terraced knob jambs. From: jon <jonberts@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 14:36:40 -0500   We've done one console "ala francais".....the organist was also the choir director and one of the requirements was a low profile. Being a 3m console and with knobs required this specific design and layout. I'd be happy to forward JPG's to any pvtly.   Sincerely,   Jon Bertschinger Voicer/Technician Temple Organs    
(back) Subject: Re: The Postlude From: RSiegel920@aol.com Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 17:23:14 EDT   In a message dated 4/25/99 2:25:41 PM Central Daylight Time, gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com writes:   << From: Robert Eversman <highnote@mhtc.net> > wow, I didn't hear from anyone ! There is honestly no one in this group >>   Per Groves:  
(back) Subject: try again Re: The Postlude From: RSiegel920@aol.com Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 17:29:00 EDT   In a message dated 4/25/99 2:25:41 PM Central Daylight Time, gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com writes:   << From: Robert Eversman <highnote@mhtc.net> > wow, I didn't hear from anyone ! There is honestly no one in this group >>   Re: Groves: volume 15, p. 155: A movement or section of a movement concluding a composition (especially for organ) hence the equivalent of a coda, conclusion or epilogue. Hindemith's "Ludus Tonalis" for piano (1943) ends with a postludium which is an exact reversion and inversion of the opening praeludium. Specifically, the term is sometimes given to the organ piece, frequently improvised, which is played at the end of a service during the exit of the congregation, i.e. the concluding voluntary. Michael Tilmouth copyright 1980, Macmillan Publishers, New York and London Hope this helps.  
(back) Subject: Re: RE: favorite organ pieces From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 17:58:18 EDT     In a message dated 4.24.99 9:06:47 PM, moorehse@midwest.net writes:   <<at the age of 12, my mother dragged me to the dedcation concert for the organ in our new parish shurch in Wauwatosa, Wi.>>   You've got to admit that that conjures an interesting picture. If she did it at that age, you must have been very young indeed.   Alan Freed who's said even dumber things pretty often  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: The Postlude From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 18:29:02 EDT     In a message dated 4.25.99 3:19:35 PM, highnote@mhtc.net writes:   <<wow, I didn't hear from anyone ! There is honestly no one in this group who has a suggestion for me ? (now be nice!) :)>>   Robert, I responded so fast when you wanted to give away an ikon. Now, nothing.   I am not sanguine about finding much on this. But I'll give it a try this week, and get back to you.   I think that Bud Clark would be as sensible a speculator as you'd find on it--but I wonder whether speculation, indeed, might not be very nearly the only source. Groves? Gee, I doubt it. Don't have a copy, though.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: The Postlude From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 20:05:00 -0400 (EDT)   >wow, I didn't hear from anyone ! =A0 There is > honestly no one in this group who has a > suggestion for me ? (now be nice!) =A0 :) >help ......... ! >How did this thing called the Postlude begin? Like most things of this nature, probably no one knows for sure. It was probably started by some eager organist, short of patience, who wanted to get started practicing right after church. Could also be an extension of the voluntary music which covered the procession leaving the choir after the sung office. Or, it could be that organists are just so dang eager to do things for free while people talk!! ;<)   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   If a dog will not come to you after he has looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience. --Woodrow Wilson    
(back) Subject: hand-crossing From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 17:36:10 PDT   So far, the running total is 5. They are:   "allegro assai vivace" from Sonata #1 by Mendelssohn "Carillon-Sortie" by Mulet toccata "Thou Art The Rock" by Mulet "Procession" by Mulet toccata "O Sons and Daughters" by Farnum   Can anyone think of more? Remember, hands crossing on the same manual.   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: birth & death dates From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 19:30:52 PDT   Hey gang,   does anyone out there know the birth and death dates of composer Norman Coke-Jephcott? There doesn't seem to be all that much information about him out there?   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: FBC, Sunday, April 25... From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 21:50:57 -0500   Warning: Non-organ people; there are some organ terms in here!! See footnotes for help!!   Hello everyone,   I have completed my service at the First Baptist Church of Greenville, Alabama. The service was a trial, the sucess of which makes or breaks a new weekly job for me. I and the congregation thought it went great, but I have yet to hear the thoughts from the "personnel committee." The service was done in a contemporary style, as all of their night services are done, and I was not able to play a prelude; they like to use recorded classical music instead. But, I started with the hymns, and was allowed to play a "Message in Song" (i.e. trial organ solo), and everyone seemed to like it (title- "When in our Music God is Glorified"). I also pulled enough strings to get the organ chamber lights turned on so the congregation could actually see the pipes for the first time in about 80 years [1]. The chambers have nice "GE Soft White" bulbs in them that emit the standard "yellowish" house light. The lighting created a very artistic picture behind the grill cloth, which, of course, becomes transparent with any light greater than that on the other side [1]. As for the organ, it is a traditional Estey [2] from 1908, consisting of 2 manuals and 12 ranks [2]. It sounds nearly like a theatre organ when tremulants [4] and/or strings are applied [3]. It also has a wonderful concert flute in the great, and a convincing reedless oboe in the swell. The swell is "tremulated" [4] and enclosed, while the great is open and has no tremulant [5], but might after the new organ tech takes over. It has a newer Reisner console with a Peterson electronic relay [6].   The youth in the front seemed particularly interested in 1) talking, and 2) the operation of the swell shades. They would stare each time the shades moved, and people would start looking around at odd angles trying to get a better look at the pipes inside "the box." Many people did not know the church even HAD a pipe organ until they saw the pipes today! (Including the pastor!!) As if the hisses and pops during operation, and those "good ole' clicking windchests" that Estey made weren't enough of a clue [7].   That's about it for now. Organ people, double check my footnotes and let me know if I'm wrong about anything, so I can send corrections around!   Kevin Cartrwight Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com   Footnotes: [1] The organ (pipes and chambers) is located in the front of the sanctuary, above the two entrance foyers to either side. It opens through two openings in each pipe chamber (left and right chambers), one into the chancel, where the choir sits, and one toward the congregation in the sanctuary. The pipes are hidden behind Melotone brand "grillcloth," which blocks view, but is supposed to be about 99% sound transparent. When lighted from the BACK, the pipes are visible from the sanctuary due to the thin property of the cloth. However, in normal conditions, you can not see through it from the sanctuary, but if you were to look toward the audience from inside the organ chambers, you could see the PEOPLE instead. Basically, if you backlight it, you can see through it.   [2] "Estey" is the company that made the organ. Most non-organ people are familiar with the name because of their many "pump organs." However, they also made pipe organs that are considered by many to be of medial quality. Manuals are the keyboards from which the pipes are played. A "rank" is one set of pipes, consisting of all notes from the bottom of the controlling manual to the top of the manual. This organ has pipes available at these pitches (lowest pipe = length in feet): 16', 8', 4', 2 2/3', 2', and 1 1/3'. There are basically 61 pipes in a set (5 octaves) in this organ, with the exception of two "pedal ranks," which can only be played with the "foot pedals;" feet playing the bass notes.   [3] Theatre organ- a type of pipe organ with certain ranks of pipes that are characteristic of a theatre organ, that imitate the sounds of a real orchestra. These are most commonly used in theatres, where one organist controls a "unit orchestra" (i.e. the theatre organ), and provides music for events or silent films. In the days of the silent film, the organist usually played during the day, and the full orchestra replaced him for the night shows. A few "theatre organ ranks" include the Tibia (Spanish for "warm," also used to imitate a female's singing voice), the theatre Vox Humana (representing a man's singing voice), the Kinura (sounding like a dead Oboe [?]), the English Post Horn (REALLY loud), the Diaphone (low bass pipes, originally invented to be used as fog horns, later tuned to certain pitches and adapted to organs for powerful bass), and MANY more. These organs also include such percussions as xylophones, marimbas, tuned sleigh bells, all types of drums, triangles, gongs, then bird whistles, train whistles, sirens, auto horns, and MANY more. Theatre organs also have a nice "bank" of strings; which are pipes that have been built and adjusted in such a way as to sound like a stringed instrument; varying from the string bass, to the viola, and the violin.   [4] The "tremolo" is the vibrato, or wavering in power of speech. This is characteristic of many solo instrumentalists, and has been duplicated for use in organs. Also, a theatre organ is known for its tremolo.   [5] The great, or the chamber on the left side of the sanctuary, has no means of volume control, therefore it is "unenclosed" or "open." Volume control is obtained by means of large wooden shutters that open or close under the control of a tilting foot pedal in the organ's console.   [6] Reisner console was a seperate organ part that was simply bought, and not custom made for the organ. This particular console actually has more control functions than needed. The Peterson relay is an electronic device that "relays" the signals from the manuals to the pipes, telling the correct pipes to play at the correct times. This replaced an older, pnumatically operated relay which physically moved large switches which made the correct connections. Now, it is all done inside a small computer chip. More or less, the pipes activate from an electric impulse that is sent to the electromagnet that pulls the pipe's valve open.   [7] The Estey Company had a strange building method, which produced pipe chests that clicked when a note was played. When the pipes are playing in sequence (commonly known as "music"), the very pronounced mechanical clicks are heard chattering and banging as the beast operates. This little flaw has made Estey pipeorgans famous; "Where there's an Estey, there's a click..."    
(back) Subject: Re: FBC, Sunday, April 25... From: Frank Johnson <usd465@hit.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 22:04:01 -0600   >Warning: Non-organ people; there are some organ terms in here!! See >footnotes for help!! > >Hello everyone,     Kevin, Do you have a picture of you at YOUR OWN console? I'd really like to see it if such a photo exists.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Fw: FBC, Sunday, April 25... From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 22:27:37 -0500   Kevin... That was a wonderful description of an obviously GREAT Sunday. The organ seems very nice -- you showman, you. Interior light always adds something -- this time, to let the congregation see all the plumbing. I hope you land the position, and from my show-biz background...break a leg (wrong thing to say to an organist, right?)   Rick dutchorgan@svs.net Who put the bird nests in the diaphones??? -----Original Message----- From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> To: kjalpine@flash.net <kjalpine@flash.net>; jpdubose@alaweb.com <jpdubose@alaweb.com>; sheeztrue@aol.com <sheeztrue@aol.com>; 106200.11@compuserve.com <106200.11@compuserve.com>; 103202.2212@compuserve.com <103202.2212@compuserve.com>; pfhf@alaweb.com <pfhf@alaweb.com>; keyboard@primary.net <keyboard@primary.net>; stuart.thompson@ieee.org <stuart.thompson@ieee.org>; pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org>; timsprayberry@ibm.net <timsprayberry@ibm.net>; PIPORG-L@CNSIBM.ALBANY.EDU <PIPORG-L@CNSIBM.ALBANY.EDU>; jennywre@alaweb.com <jennywre@alaweb.com>; caracol2@juno.com <caracol2@juno.com>; jcurt@alaweb.com <jcurt@alaweb.com>; jammin28@juno.com <jammin28@juno.com>; beaupiano@earthlink.net <beaupiano@earthlink.net>; organchat@onelist.com <organchat@onelist.com>; churchorganist@onelist.com <churchorganist@onelist.com>; pipes-trains@onelist.com <pipes-trains@onelist.com>; theatreorgans-l@theatreorgans.com <theatreorgans-l@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sunday, April 25, 1999 9:54 PM Subject: FBC, Sunday, April 25...     >Warning: Non-organ people; there are some organ terms in here!! See >footnotes for help!! > >Hello everyone, > >I have completed my service at the First Baptist Church of Greenville, >Alabama. The service was a trial, the sucess of which makes or breaks a >new weekly job for me. I and the congregation thought it went great, >but I have yet to hear the thoughts from the "personnel committee." The >service was done in a contemporary style, as all of their night services >are done, and I was not able to play a prelude; they like to use >recorded classical music instead. But, I started with the hymns, and >was allowed to play a "Message in Song" (i.e. trial organ solo), and >everyone seemed to like it (title- "When in our Music God is >Glorified"). I also pulled enough strings to get the organ chamber >lights turned on so the congregation could actually see the pipes for >the first time in about 80 years [1]. The chambers have nice "GE Soft >White" bulbs in them that emit the standard "yellowish" house light. >The lighting created a very artistic picture behind the grill cloth, >which, of course, becomes transparent with any light greater than that >on the other side [1]. As for the organ, it is a traditional Estey [2] >from 1908, consisting of 2 manuals and 12 ranks [2]. It sounds nearly >like a theatre organ when tremulants [4] and/or strings are applied >[3]. It also has a wonderful concert flute in the great, and a >convincing reedless oboe in the swell. The swell is "tremulated" [4] >and enclosed, while the great is open and has no tremulant [5], but >might after the new organ tech takes over. It has a newer Reisner >console with a Peterson electronic relay [6]. > >The youth in the front seemed particularly interested in 1) talking, and >2) the operation of the swell shades. They would stare each time the >shades moved, and people would start looking around at odd angles trying >to get a better look at the pipes inside "the box." Many people did not >know the church even HAD a pipe organ until they saw the pipes today! >(Including the pastor!!) As if the hisses and pops during operation, >and those "good ole' clicking windchests" that Estey made weren't enough >of a clue [7]. > >That's about it for now. Organ people, double check my footnotes and >let me know if I'm wrong about anything, so I can send corrections >around! > >Kevin Cartrwight >Greenville, Alabama >kevin1@alaweb.com > >Footnotes: >[1] The organ (pipes and chambers) is located in the front of the >sanctuary, above the two entrance foyers to either side. It opens >through two openings in each pipe chamber (left and right chambers), one >into the chancel, where the choir sits, and one toward the congregation >in the sanctuary. The pipes are hidden behind Melotone brand >"grillcloth," which blocks view, but is supposed to be about 99% sound >transparent. When lighted from the BACK, the pipes are visible from the >sanctuary due to the thin property of the cloth. However, in normal >conditions, you can not see through it from the sanctuary, but if you >were to look toward the audience from inside the organ chambers, you >could see the PEOPLE instead. Basically, if you backlight it, you can >see through it. > >[2] "Estey" is the company that made the organ. Most non-organ people >are familiar with the name because of their many "pump organs." >However, they also made pipe organs that are considered by many to be of >medial quality. Manuals are the keyboards from which the pipes are >played. A "rank" is one set of pipes, consisting of all notes from the >bottom of the controlling manual to the top of the manual. This organ >has pipes available at these pitches (lowest pipe = length in feet): >16', 8', 4', 2 2/3', 2', and 1 1/3'. There are basically 61 pipes in a >set (5 octaves) in this organ, with the exception of two "pedal ranks," >which can only be played with the "foot pedals;" feet playing the bass >notes. > >[3] Theatre organ- a type of pipe organ with certain ranks of pipes >that are characteristic of a theatre organ, that imitate the sounds of a >real orchestra. These are most commonly used in theatres, where one >organist controls a "unit orchestra" (i.e. the theatre organ), and >provides music for events or silent films. In the days of the silent >film, the organist usually played during the day, and the full orchestra >replaced him for the night shows. A few "theatre organ ranks" include >the Tibia (Spanish for "warm," also used to imitate a female's singing >voice), the theatre Vox Humana (representing a man's singing voice), the >Kinura (sounding like a dead Oboe [?]), the English Post Horn (REALLY >loud), the Diaphone (low bass pipes, originally invented to be used as >fog horns, later tuned to certain pitches and adapted to organs for >powerful bass), and MANY more. These organs also include such >percussions as xylophones, marimbas, tuned sleigh bells, all types of >drums, triangles, gongs, then bird whistles, train whistles, sirens, >auto horns, and MANY more. Theatre organs also have a nice "bank" of >strings; which are pipes that have been built and adjusted in such a way >as to sound like a stringed instrument; varying from the string bass, to >the viola, and the violin. > >[4] The "tremolo" is the vibrato, or wavering in power of speech. This >is characteristic of many solo instrumentalists, and has been duplicated >for use in organs. Also, a theatre organ is known for its tremolo. > >[5] The great, or the chamber on the left side of the sanctuary, has no >means of volume control, therefore it is "unenclosed" or "open." Volume >control is obtained by means of large wooden shutters that open or close >under the control of a tilting foot pedal in the organ's console. > >[6] Reisner console was a seperate organ part that was simply bought, >and not custom made for the organ. This particular console actually has >more control functions than needed. The Peterson relay is an electronic >device that "relays" the signals from the manuals to the pipes, telling >the correct pipes to play at the correct times. This replaced an older, >pnumatically operated relay which physically moved large switches which >made the correct connections. Now, it is all done inside a small >computer chip. More or less, the pipes activate from an electric >impulse that is sent to the electromagnet that pulls the pipe's valve >open. > >[7] The Estey Company had a strange building method, which produced pipe >chests that clicked when a note was played. When the pipes are playing >in sequence (commonly known as "music"), the very pronounced mechanical >clicks are heard chattering and banging as the beast operates. This >little flaw has made Estey pipeorgans famous; "Where there's an Estey, >there's a click..." > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: birth & death dates From: "John M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 23:27:38 -0000   Norman Coke-Jephcott born Coventry, England, Mar. 11, 1893; died New York City, Mar. 14, 1962. (From my well used copy of Organ Literature by Corliss Arnold, published by Scarecrow Press)   JOHN          
(back) Subject: pipe search From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 22:31:49 -0500   Hi List... Anyone out there can help me find a 4' Rohr Flute? Voicing on 1+ACI- to 1- 1/2+ACI- pressure. Thanks, und Danke Schoen   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net Cuckoo clocks make great wedding gifts      
(back) Subject: Re:off topic - bob conway From: Claire <fleahopper@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 22:44:16 +0000   sorry for bandwidth - Bob Conway - we're in   kingston - please call 546-4233 or we'll try to reach you in am Monday Claire    
(back) Subject: Re:off topic - bob conway From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 1999 21:16:28 -0700   Hope you guys (and gals) have a terrific time!! I'm envious. Maybe, someday, there'll be a west coast U.S. Hamfest! :-)   As Ad says, Have Fun!   (Maybe Ad or Marc could post a few pics to the website?? Prease!) Ron Yost, Paso Robles, Calif.