PipeChat Digest #1011 - Sunday, August 1, 1999
 
Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: MIDI and the organist
  by "Greg Corbett" <corbettg@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Contact Info for Fred Hohman/Pro Organo
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Wesley UMC, Aurora, IL
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Website for OHS
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Last night I lay a-sleeping...
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: input please
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Whew! Was "Standards" and more
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: input please
  by "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com>
Evening Prayer/Vespers Services with Organ
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Evening Prayer/Vespers Services with Organ
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: input please
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: input please
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Evening Prayer/Vespers Services with Organ
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 09:36:52 -0400 (EDT)   >I am curious if some of you might have > repertoire and or thematic ideas for upcoming > compact disc recordings of the Grande Kilgen > in the National Shrine of the Little Flower. Since the Shrine is also of great architectural interest, you might consider a CD with a booklet containing photographs of windows and other architectural symbols. Repertoire could be coordinated to the particular theme of the window, etc. An obvious choice would be the "Stations of the Cross". If you have a "Good Shepherd" window, "Sheep May Safely Graze" could be used. Several different windows depicting the life of Christ could be used with the Franck Chorales, especially the resurrection, ascension, and Christ in Majesty themes. Also the works of Messiaen could easily be used in connection with showing flying buttresses on the exterior, stenciled ceilings and wall inside, as well as exterior gardens. It really isn't difficult to discover these musical and architectural relationships. Just sit quietly in the room or walk around outside in a meditative mood. As you "wander" the music will begin to drift through your mind (and if your head is anything like mine, the acoustics are wonderful!!!!) ;-). Another possibility would be an "introduction to the organ" CD which would use various repertoire, from simple to complex, to demonstrate the different stops of the organ. In addition, pictures of swell shades coupled with romantic repertoire, as well as reservoirs and music which makes great demands on the wind system: before-chord and during-chord pictures of a reservoire would be interesting. Also pictures of the different ranks as they are demonstrated on the CD. Another possibility would be "things that help us worship." Music depecting the less-understood (by the general public, while much-loved by RCs) such as the Rosary, litanies, adoration, etc. Improvisations on the Rosary would be something that parishoners could use at home in their own devotions, much as many people have taken to the chant recordings.   Just off the top of my head.... ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: MIDI and the organist From: Greg Corbett <corbettg@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 07:06:41 -0700   I agree wholeheartedly, the midi/sequencer, is here to stay. It is up to the musician, to make the most of it.   In our small church, the organist, is also choir director. She uses the sequencer, for preludes, while she warms the choir up, downstairs. In a pinch, we have tried to use the sequencer for hymns, it doesn't work (an experiment, failed). I do agree with the postings, that suggest, recording your Sunday service repetoir into the sequencer and then patrolling the sanctuary, listening to your product, great for some finishing.   The midi, like all musical instruments, must be played with care. I know that I have caused both shock and surprise, with the midi, but by the last verse, the congregation's singing was loud (my feedback that my playing was inspiring and leading). The midi to me, is another stop with 325 or so, voices attached. One word of warning, the sound effects that are usually in the menu, should be used with reserve (like children's story time or theatrical productions).    
(back) Subject: Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 10:17:39 -0700     >Since the Shrine is also of great architectural interest, you might >consider a CD with a booklet containing photographs of windows and other >architectural symbols.   Along these lines, might its architectural features correspond to those of Henri Mulet's "Byzantine Sketches," which I think were a meditation on Sacre'-Coeur? Nave, Rose Window, side chapel, etc.   R. Runyon      
(back) Subject: Contact Info for Fred Hohman/Pro Organo From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 11:28:03 EDT   Does anyone have contact information for Fred Hohman? Thanks in advance!   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Wesley UMC, Aurora, IL From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 12:42:25 -0500   Greetings, All! .. Several weeks ago, I sent a post inquiring about this Church and its = organ. I wish to thank all that responded with replies and information. Your help is sincerely appreciated.   I have not yet 'met' the instrument in person, so cannot absolutely vouch for the accuracy of my information. For those that might be curious, however, I offer the results of the query: 1957 Schantz Pipe Organ (opus 302), 3 m/26-30 rk. The organ is apparently in chambers to the sides of the chancel of the "long, tall Gothic-style" Church building (built in the '50's). Console located in the chancel somewhere. The instrument also apparently has a recently installed "Trompeta" stop (happy horn???). Anyway, I'm looking forward to the chance to play the organ.   All this leads to the point of THIS post. Another question to the "collective intelligence":   The occasion for my future experience with this organ is the upcoming wedding of my little sister, which I have agreed to play for. I would consider myself to be a very amateur organist, although I do make my = living as an organbuilder. I've had a little formal study, as a teenager, but that was a dozen years ago. I've chosen some "easy" music (that "I" like!), and have been having reasonable success at actually learning/relearning it. I plan 5-10 min Prelude; 3-4 min Processional; = 3-4 min Recessional; 4-5 min Postlude. My sister thinks this should be fine, as the ceremony will be of "medium to small affair" status as such things go. I have arranged for access to the organ in Aurora a couple days in advance for practice and registration (and have been practicing in the meantime on a larger 3m instrument here). I plan to attend the rehearsal to get a sense of timing.   OK, now...   What have I: Forgotten?? Not planned for?? Planned too much for??   What: "Always happens"?? "Never happens"??   Who's got a copy of "Weddings for Dummies"...? <grin>   I don't really wish to start another "weddings from h***..." thread = (though that WAS rather enlightening...) by asking these questions -- I ask only for a bit of practical advice from those that really DO play weddings, in order to attempt to do it as well as I can. Any advice on "what to look out for" will be gratefully received.   Private replies are welcome, if you don't feel the topic to be of public interest. <tmbovard@arkansas.net>   Thanks in advance!   Tim            
(back) Subject: Website for OHS From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 18:10:59 EDT   Is there such a place? If so what's the www address? Thanks!   Scott  
(back) Subject: Re: Last night I lay a-sleeping... From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 18:15:50 EDT   In a message dated 7/29/99 2:48:23 PM Central Daylight Time, = tomj@netpath.net writes:   << I was glad to wake up. >>   Tom,   Did you go out to a pub and leave your drink unattended for a few minutes that night?   John  
(back) Subject: Re: input please From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 18:25:00 EDT   In a message dated 7/29/99 1:32:19 AM Central Daylight Time, ray_ahrens@hotmail.com writes:   << Today I found an envelope marked "Organist" in my box at church >>   I would ask the minister to read that letter to the congregation during = the announcement time in your next service. While this is being done have a = few choir members watch for reactions and for anyone who slinks out of the church. Furthermore, it is likely that you will have an influx of people = who support your efforts tell you so after the service.   In short, turn it back on the lily-livered person who doesn't have the = huevos to sign their own name to that tacky letter. John  
(back) Subject: Re: Whew! Was "Standards" and more From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 18:36:02 EDT   In a message dated 7/29/99 11:17:46 AM Central Daylight Time, theraven@sympatico.ca writes:   << I imagine you must be an assault to to any crowd as well. Just a thought :( I personally prefer Paul's method. But then, eh, to each his own. I wonder if the organist has anything to do with the50% divorce rates. John as organist...the poor couple for sure have no chance at a happy = start. Paul as organist..... well, at least they had a good start. >>   Now that is downright RUDE - I do not "assualt" my crowds, as a matter of fact I get accolades every time I am at the church. Furthermore, If I did =   "assault" my parishoners I can tell you that I would not have been in = church music for over 18 years (since I was 13)!   As far as the "poor couple" go -- I could care less, one always gets in return what one dishes out.   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 19:02:45 EDT   In a message dated 7/30/99 9:22:30 PM Central Daylight Time, = ScottFop@aol.com writes:   << I am curious if some of you might have repertoire and or thematic ideas =   for upcoming compact disc recordings of the Grande Kilgen in the National = Shrine of the Little Flower. >>   Scott,   How about a recording which features music based on the liturgy of the = Roman Catholic Church from various composers through the ages? You'd have a = wealth of material from which to plan.   John  
(back) Subject: Re: input please From: "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 17:36:39 PDT   ><< Today I found an envelope marked "Organist" in my box at church >> > >I would ask the minister to read that letter to the congregation >during >the announcement time in your next service.     That was my thought too. However, I think he's not wanting to rock the boat. Have to do it myself.     >While this is being done have a few choir members watch for >reactions = and >for anyone who slinks out of the church. Furthermore, >it is likely that =   >you will have an influx of people who support your >efforts tell you so >after the service.     I'm not worried about my support base. Many of my choristers feel more = like family than my actual family.     >In short, turn it back on the lily-livered person who doesn't have the >huevos to sign their own name to that tacky letter.   Exactamundo. I'll keep y'all posted.   Ray     _______________________________________________________________ Get Free Email and Do More On The Web. Visit http://www.msn.com  
(back) Subject: Evening Prayer/Vespers Services with Organ From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 21:27:22 EDT   I have already mentioned Joncas' "St. Francis Evening Prayer" which is absolutely exquisite. Does anyone know of any other evening = prayer/vespers services with organ accompaniment that would be good to look at?   Thanks in advance   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: Re: Evening Prayer/Vespers Services with Organ From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 19:01:08 -0700   Well, you could always put together a "cut-glass" Anglican-style Evensong = with the psalms in Anglican chant or Gregorian chant with fauxbourdons, and = some great turn-of-the-century English Mag and Nunc, since RC vespers is pretty free-form these days.   There's a Polish Baroque setting of Compline for SATB and string orchestra = ... forget the composer's name.   Of course, if you want to do LATIN Vespers, there's scads of stuff (grin).   We've pretty much settled on Gregorian Mattins and Evensong for weekdays, = and Anglican canticles and Gregorian psalms for Sundays.   Cheers,   Bud   ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > I have already mentioned Joncas' "St. Francis Evening Prayer" which is > absolutely exquisite. Does anyone know of any other evening = prayer/vespers > services with organ accompaniment that would be good to look at? > > Thanks in advance > > Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination > National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: input please From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jul 1999 21:33:36 -0500   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 7/29/99 1:32:19 AM Central Daylight Time, > ray_ahrens@hotmail.com writes: > > << Today I found an envelope marked "Organist" in my box at church >> > > I would ask the minister to read that letter to the congregation during = the > announcement time in your next service. While this is being done have a = few > choir members watch for reactions and for anyone who slinks out of the > church. Furthermore, it is likely that you will have an influx of = people who > support your efforts tell you so after the service. > > In short, turn it back on the lily-livered person who doesn't have the = huevos > to sign their own name to that tacky letter.   This solution seems a little confrontational for my liking. It does, however, remind me of the minister who lost his umbrella and was convoinced that one of the congregation had stolen it. He said to one of the congregation he knew he could trust, "I am going to read the Ten Commandments at the service, and when I get to 'Thou shalt not steal' I want you to look around and see if anyone has a red face." After the service the man came up to the minister and said, "I looked around, but I couldn't see any red faces." "That's all right," the moinister said, "When I got to 'Thou shalt not commit adultery' I remembered where I had left my umbrella."   John.  
(back) Subject: Re: input please From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 1 Aug 1999 00:04:39 EDT   In a message dated 7/31/99 9:40:55 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << "That's all right," the moinister said, "When I got to 'Thou shalt not commit adultery' I remembered where I had left my umbrella." >>   Now that is funny!!! :-)   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Evening Prayer/Vespers Services with Organ From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 1 Aug 1999 00:30:31 EDT   In a message dated 7/31/99 8:29:54 PM Central Daylight Time, = ScottFop@aol.com writes:   << Does anyone know of any other evening prayer/vespers services with organ accompaniment that would be good to look at? >>   Scott,   I would suggest the Evening Service in D Major ("The Great") by Sir Hubert = H. Parry; the Short Service or the Second Evening Service both by Orlando Gibbons -- They are all lovely and luscious services!   John