PipeChat Digest #1017 - Thursday, August 5, 1999
 
Round Lake NY Organ
  by "David McPeak <Mack>" <dm726@delphi.com>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Bach takes a break.
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: glue
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Bud/chris" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Bud/chris" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Contemp. Organ Case in Trad. Church
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Bud/chris" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Round Lake NY Organ
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
organ literature
  by "Bud/chris" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "John  M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Bach MS found
  by <JKVDP@aol.com>
Bach Shot?
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Roy Wilson" <royjaneann@hotmail.com>
 


(back) Subject: Round Lake NY Organ From: "David McPeak <Mack>" <dm726@delphi.com> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 20:39:48 -0400   I have been reading the posts of Agnes Armstrong about the problems at Round Lake, and have added my letter of support to them. I also seem to remember there is a web site for the organ at least, but I cannot locate it. Does someone on this list have the address?   TIA   Cheers, Dave McPeak    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 19:43:43 -0500   Thank you very much, Roy, for sharing that. I may have known of that publication, but had forgotten about it.   Glenda Sutton     ---------- > From: Roy Wilson <royjaneann@hotmail.com>   > The Church Hymnal Corporation, NY, has published "An Organists's Guide = to   > Resources for THE HYMNAL, 1982", compiled by Dennis Schmidt, 1987. It lists > hymntunes in alphabetical order, cites the number in The Hymnal, 1982 = and   > lists "organ settings, descants, and organ-with-instrument settings" for =   > hymn tunes used in the hymnal. The hymns themselves are catagorized by > season of the Church Year, where applicable. Additionally, it assigns a =   > level of difficulty for each composition. I find this to be a helpful > resource.    
(back) Subject: Bach takes a break. From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 19:49:33 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00C8_01BEDF7B.A424D000 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Thank you to those of you who helped me find a Bach piece with a =3D dramatic pause. I had thought of the Passacaglia and Fugue, but not the = =3D big G major Prelude. Thank you to those of you who suggested it. Now =3D on to why I was looking for it. I received an email from an author =3D writing a piece of historical fiction set in 1901. I quote the author: "Incidental to the narrative is the assassination of US President =3D William McKinley at the Temple of Music in the Pan-American Exposition =3D in Buffalo, NY" This author is trying to use all the dramatic details he can find in an = =3D effort to make his story as colorful as possible. He continues: "In a newspaper account of the murder, it is noted that "Organist Gomph" = =3D had just reached a natural break in a Bach piece. ("Organist Gomph had =3D reached the highest notes in one of Bach's masterpieces on the great =3D pipe organ, and=3D20 as he stopped at the height to let the strains reverberate through the =3D auditorium the two shots rang out.") It doesn't name the piece, and =3D historians can't answer what the specific piece was..." So the author asks, "What Bach masterpiece for the organ would have such = =3D an internal climax that an organist might stop and not ruin the flow?" This author not only wants dramatic color, but to be historically =3D accurate, and musically accurate, so that even organists reading his =3D story won't stop and think, "No, that can't be right." I suggested to him both pieces, and why I personally thought the =3D Passacaglia and Fugue would have been the best choice, although =3D certainly either was possible. I asked this author to keep me informed = =3D of the status of his book, so that the story can be shared in the =3D future. Certainly if this author has gone through the trouble to keep =3D organists appeased, it must be a good book all around! It also brings up one other point that I dare to tread upon. If I must = =3D be shot down dead in my prime, what Bach piece would I like to be =3D listening to at the time? Just a thought, no exploration is necessary. Thanks again to those who helped.   Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com brent@organwebring.com   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00C8_01BEDF7B.A424D000 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type><BASE=3D20 href=3D3D"file://C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft =3D Shared\Stationery\"> <STYLE></STYLE>   <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2614.3401" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY background=3D3D""> <DIV>Thank you to those of you who helped me find a Bach piece with a =3D dramatic=3D20 pause.&nbsp; I had thought of the Passacaglia and Fugue, but not the big = =3D G major=3D20 Prelude.&nbsp; Thank you to those of you who suggested it.&nbsp; Now on = =3D to why I=3D20 was looking for it.&nbsp; I received an email from an author writing a =3D piece of=3D20 historical fiction set in 1901.&nbsp; I quote the author:</DIV> <DIV>"Incidental to the narrative is the assassination of US President =3D William=3D20 McKinley at the Temple of Music in the Pan-American Exposition in =3D Buffalo,=3D20 NY"</DIV> <DIV>This author is trying to use all the dramatic details he can find =3D in an=3D20 effort to make his story as colorful as possible.&nbsp; He =3D continues:</DIV> <DIV>"In a newspaper account of the murder, it is noted that "Organist =3D Gomph"=3D20 had just reached a natural break in a Bach piece. ("Organist Gomph had =3D reached=3D20 the highest notes in one of Bach's masterpieces on the great pipe organ, = =3D and=3D20 <BR>as he stopped at the height to let the strains reverberate through =3D the=3D20 auditorium the two shots rang out.") It doesn't name the piece, and =3D historians=3D20 can't answer what the specific piece was..."</DIV> <DIV>So the author asks, "What Bach masterpiece for the organ would have = =3D such an=3D20 internal climax that an organist might stop and not ruin the =3D flow?"</DIV> <DIV>This author not only wants dramatic color, but to be historically =3D accurate,=3D20 and musically accurate, so that even organists reading his story won't =3D stop and=3D20 think, "No, that can't be right."</DIV> <DIV>I suggested to him both pieces, and why I personally thought the=3D20 Passacaglia and Fugue would have been the best choice, although =3D certainly either=3D20 was possible.&nbsp; I asked this author to keep me informed of the =3D status of his=3D20 book, so that the story can be shared in the future.&nbsp; Certainly if = =3D this=3D20 author has gone through the trouble to keep organists appeased, it must = =3D be a=3D20 good book all around!</DIV> <DIV>It also brings up one other point that I dare to tread upon.&nbsp; = =3D If I=3D20 must be shot down dead in my prime, what Bach piece would I like to be =3D listening=3D20 to at the time?&nbsp; Just a thought, no exploration is necessary.</DIV> <DIV>Thanks again to those who helped.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Brent Johnson<BR>The Organ Web Ring<BR><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.organwebring.com">http://www.organwebring.com</A><BR><= =3D A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:brent@organwebring.com">brent@organwebring.com</A></DIV></= =3D BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00C8_01BEDF7B.A424D000--    
(back) Subject: Re: glue From: Prestant16@aol.com Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:04:28 EDT   You can probably get Hide Glue from a hope supply store. It works pretty good, as does fish glue. Franklin makes hide glue in a brown squeeze = bottle.   -William C.  
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:16:10 -0400 (EDT)     >You are much too modest :-) ....and cute, too!   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: Bud/chris <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 18:22:16 -0700       Bud wrote:   > >I'm honestly curious where this disaffection for > > chorale-preludes comes from ....   Bruce wrote:   > The disaffection, at least on my part, comes from the over use of CPs, > playing only CPs for preludes and postludes, and even using them as > filler in recitals which are not liturgical services. > Because of this much great organ literature is being ignored   While most of the great organ literature WAS written for church (I assume you refer to the Bach Ps & Fs, the Franck Chorales, the Vierne and Widor Symphonies, the big Reger pieces, etc.), most of us have not the slightest use for them in present-day churches, particularly Anglican and Roman organists who are lucky to get a bathroom break between services ... my Sunday schedule is 8-9:15-10:30 ... if the 8 or the 9:15 run over, the postlude at the former becomes the prelude to the latter.I have a MAXIMUM = of seven minutes for a prelude, except at 8:00, when I could of course start = a half-hour early and play to the angels and archangels, since the congregation routinely doesn't arrive until 7:57, if then. At services without choir, I do get to play 10-15 minutes during Communion, if only = one priest is distributing.   And then there's the "instrument" ... I'm not ABOUT to subject myself or anybody else to ANYTHING that requires a solid organo pleno for more than thirty seconds on Le Grand Hammond.   Which is not to say that I haven't PLAYED the big pieces ... I did, and = then I put them away when I decided that I didn't want to play recitals = anymore.   > and a great > many people are able to pass themselves off as organists who really are > not, in the truest sense. If one does not play the great literature > composed for the organ, I don't see how they can rightfully consider > themselves organists.   I'm not sure I want to go there, and we've had this discussion before ... there are hundreds, thousands of village organists who do yeoman (yeoperson?) service in their parish churches Sunday by Sunday without = ever playing a Bach prelude and fugue. And my hat's off to them ... there they are, Sunday after Sunday, year after year, with no budget, oftentimes no salary, with instruments that range from benignly neglected 19th century gems to moribund electronics.The woman who inspired me to become an = organist was such a one, and all she ever played was Lorenz organ magazines on a = 1907 seven-rank Estey.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:24:17 -0400 (EDT)   Roy Wilson wrote:   >I like Chorale Preludes and have favorites > which I play frequently. People know them > and for the most part enjoy them because of > familiarity.   Just out of curiosity..... how often do you play a major work for your congregation, such as a large prelude & fugue, toccata or other such piece?   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: Bud/chris <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 18:24:16 -0700   But but but but but!   Depriving the Couperin, de Grigny, etc. of their chant verses is to = deprive them of half the music the composer intended, surely just as great a musicological and liturgical sin as not singing the chorales before or after the chorale preludes.   Cheers,   Bud   P.S. - I can't think of many baroque chorale-preludes that DON'T stand on their own as absolute music.   bruce cornely wrote:   > > Perhaps pairing the performance of a > > chorale prelude with audience participation > > (singing the tune in translation) would > > contribute greatly to the palatability of these > > works in concert. > A little bit, but not very much. If a CP is good and interesting > music, as Bach's generally are, then they will stand on their own > without hearing the hymn sung. The Schubler Chorales are an excellent > example. Also, "Come Holy Ghost." The typical contemporary CP will > probably not be helped much by a sing-through of the hymn. > > >Yes, it IS highly desirable to perform the > > chorale-preludes with the sung chorale > > melodies, just as it is highly desirable to > > supply the missing Chant verses to the > > French Baroque organ Masses. > The Couperin Masses generally stand on their own as organ literature, > although when played in entirety can be just a bit snoozifying. > > Bruce & the Baskerbeagles > ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~ > > I love a dog. He does nothing for political reasons. -- Will > Rogers > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Contemp. Organ Case in Trad. Church From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:28:52 -0400 (EDT)     >Can you install a Contemp. Organ with the > Contemp. Case work ... in a building with ... > simplified gothic architecture ( a very > tall/bright-white room) while still fixing the > facade, somehow, in a traditional look, but still > contemp.??????? Nope! Sorry! It only works in bright-GREEN rooms! hehehehe ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: Bud/chris <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 18:31:51 -0700       bruce cornely wrote:   > Roy Wilson wrote: > > >I like Chorale Preludes and have favorites > > which I play frequently. People know them > > and for the most part enjoy them because of > > familiarity. > > Just out of curiosity..... how often do you play a major work for your > congregation, such as a large prelude & fugue, toccata or other such > piece?   Never, and I make no apologies, after five operations and a year in = bed.But I wouldn't anyway ...   Cheers,   Bud   > > > Bruce & the Baskerbeagles > ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~ > > I love a dog. He does nothing for political reasons. -- Will > Rogers > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:36:59 EDT   In a message dated 8/5/99 6:54:56 AM Central Daylight Time, = KriderSM@aol.com writes:   << or: Numbers 22: 30 is more PC this way: "And the "Bleep" said unto = Balaam, Am I not thine "Bleep", upon which thou hast ridden ever since I was = thine unto this day?" >>   What a HOOT!!! I enjoyed a hearty belly laugh (and mind you I have a big belly) over this posting. Thanks be to God for folks with a sense of = humour.   I can glad to see that not everyone is a *BLEEP* ; - )   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:41:48 EDT   In a message dated 8/5/99 3:11:13 PM Central Daylight Time, edwardorgan@hotmail.com writes:   << .. But as a minister, I am bound to say, "God is not a respecter of persons." But my compliments are still extended. >> Hmmmm, you lost me here... Your point is???   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Round Lake NY Organ From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 21:43:31 -0400   http://www.roundlakevillage.org/ will take you there.   Stan Lowkis   "David McPeak " wrote: > > I have been reading the posts of Agnes Armstrong about the problems at > Round Lake, and have added my letter of support to them. I also seem to > remember there is a web site for the organ at least, but I cannot locate > it. Does someone on this list have the address? > > TIA > > Cheers, > Dave McPeak  
(back) Subject: organ literature From: Bud/chris <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 18:44:12 -0700   My duties as Choirmaster and Organist at St. Matthew's are as follows, in order of importance:   (1) Lead the choirs and congregation in the hymns and chants of the Liturgy (2) Train the adult and children's choirs in the singing of the Liturgy, particularly the singing of the Psalms (3) Teach the seminarians the rudiments of Gregorian Chant and lead them in singing the Daily Offices (4) Teach the choirs anthems and motets (5) Develop a durable library of liturgical choral music (i.e., write and/or arrange it), including complete Gregorian and Anglican Chant Psalters, seasonal settings of the Mass and the Canticles, the Propers, the Antiphons, etc. etc. etc. ... I write on the order of a hundred pages a week in high season.   At no time in my initial interview or subsequent conferences with the Rector was organ music EVER been mentioned. I didn't audition; at the end of the interview, I said, "Don't you want to hear me PLAY?" The Rector said, "No, after looking over your resume and your liturgical compositions and arrangements, I'm quite sure you can play the organ." End of discussion.Lucky for him I CAN (grin) ...   Occasionally I get requests for organ music ... I honor them, if I can .... usually they're pretty simple, like Handel's "Largo" or Bach's "Air in D", or the slow movement of the New World Symphony for funerals or "Jesu, Joy" for weddings.The congregation pretty much likes anything I play, since my predecessor's repertoire of preludes and postludes was limited to hymns from the Hymnal.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: "John M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com> Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 22:13:03 -0000   One can use portions of great works for service music - fer instance the first few pages of Franck's E major choral, or the few pages of the = trumpet solo section. I use the Adagio from Grand Piece for an offertory - the Prelude from Prelude Fugue & Variation, the Fugue section, too. If you don't know the next to last movement from Widor's Fifth, you have missed something gorgeous. Etc. JOHN          
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:36:38 -0500 (CDT)   On Thu, 5 Aug 1999, Bud/chris wrote: > While most of the great organ literature WAS written for church Let me just point out that what we consider to be "great organ literature" is only the tip of the iceberg. Up until recently, organists improvised music for services, and would write down noteworthy efforts for the benefit of their students (e.g. Bach, Sweelinck) or to make money by having it published (e.g. Grigny) I think it's a stretch to say that the folks you mention (JSB, Widor, Vierne, and especially Franck) wrote their masterpieces for church use. The simple fact that the music actually made it onto paper means that these works go beyond the scope of the church.   > (I assume > you refer to the Bach Ps & Fs, the Franck Chorales, the Vierne and Widor > Symphonies, the big Reger pieces, etc.), most of us have not the = slightest > use for them in present-day churches, particularly Anglican and Roman .... > And then there's the "instrument" ... I'm not ABOUT to subject myself or > anybody else to ANYTHING that requires a solid organo pleno for more = than > thirty seconds on Le Grand Hammond. Well, all I can say is, you're imposing a very artificial argument on yourself. Never mind the greats of organ music...You have an instrument, and a congregation that requires music. So, just do what organists have been doing for centuries...improvise! No more having to futz around with drawknobs trying to imitate a Schnitger, just work with the instrument at hand. Every now and again, you'll even come up with a little gem that you decide to write down in polished form to be added to the wonderful repertoire for the Hammond.   > > many people are able to pass themselves off as organists who really = are > > not, in the truest sense. If one does not play the great literature > > composed for the organ, I don't see how they can rightfully consider > > themselves organists. In exactly the same way that I considered myself a trombonist after a month of playing in the Junior High School marching band.   (rapidly departing from Bruce's camp on this one)   Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn   "Does it change many dyslexics how to take a lightbulb?"    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 22:36:46 -0400 (EDT)   All these bleeps, it's beginning to sound like the french fries are ready at Mickey D's.   May we give John a break now? He has apologized for his language, has been scorned for it, and "is the better man" for it.   I had to sit through 40 bleeping minutes of fond bleeping remembrances at a memorial service today before we could bleeping sing the final hymn. Ee bleeping gads. This was after the service started 15 minutes late because one of the daughters is perpetually late (a bleeping fact she tried to make joke of during her bleeping remembrance). Ah, the crosses we must bear.   --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach MS found From: JKVDP@aol.com Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 22:39:05 EDT   National Public Radio today had on its program "All Things Considered" a = five minute feature on the find with Dr. Christoph(?) Wolff from Yale. Jerry in Seattle  
(back) Subject: Bach Shot? From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 23:12:49 -0400 (EDT)   I'd say "air on a G-string" would be a most sublime way to go, with the strings of the Wannamaker, of course. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 20:53:24 -0700       Robert Horton wrote:   > On Thu, 5 Aug 1999, Bud/chris wrote: > > While most of the great organ literature WAS written for church > Let me just point out that what we consider to be "great organ > literature" is only the tip of the iceberg. Up until recently, = organists > improvised music for services, and would write down noteworthy efforts = for > the benefit of their students (e.g. Bach, Sweelinck) or to make money by > having it published (e.g. Grigny) > I think it's a stretch to say that the folks you mention (JSB, = Widor, > Vierne, and especially Franck) wrote their masterpieces for church use. > The simple fact that the music actually made it onto paper means that > these works go beyond the scope of the church.   Sorry, I disagree ... they might have WISHED for another venue, but all = the organs (both in Bach's time and later) were in churches, except for a few = chamber organs. The concert hall organ didn't come into existence until the 19th = century, unless you want to count Handel's theatre organs.   I might have misspoke concerning the Franck chorales ... I don't have my references handy ... I don't recall which pieces were written for the = Trocadero organ ... certainly Grand Piece Symphonique, Piece Heroique, and the = Final, but I forget which others, if any. Certainly the Priere was written for church.     > > > > (I assume > > you refer to the Bach Ps & Fs, the Franck Chorales, the Vierne and = Widor > > Symphonies, the big Reger pieces, etc.), most of us have not the = slightest > > use for them in present-day churches, particularly Anglican and Roman > ... > > And then there's the "instrument" ... I'm not ABOUT to subject myself = or > > anybody else to ANYTHING that requires a solid organo pleno for more = than > > thirty seconds on Le Grand Hammond.   > > Well, all I can say is, you're imposing a very artificial = argument > on yourself. Never mind the greats of organ music...You have an > instrument, and a congregation that requires music. So, just do what > organists have been doing for centuries...improvise!   Come by after Evensong on Wednesdays and I'll favor you with an = improvisation on the "Salve Regina", or "Lucis creator optime", or "Te lucis ante = terminum"; come to Mattins at 6 a.m. on Fridays (yes, there are people who get up that = early) and you're likely to hear an improvisation on "Nocte surgentes" or "Splendor = paternae gloriae", or whatever the seasonal or festal Office Hymns happen to be.   > No more having > to futz around with drawknobs trying to imitate a Schnitger, just work > with the instrument at hand. Every now and again, you'll even come up > with a little gem that you decide to write down in polished form to be > added to the wonderful repertoire for the Hammond.   I have no intention of adding ANYTHING to the Hammond except whatever it = takes to facilitate its earliest demise. It is capable of accompanying the chants = of the Mass and the Office, and quiet improvisations ... anything else, FORGET!   > > > > > many people are able to pass themselves off as organists who really = are > > > not, in the truest sense. If one does not play the great = literature > > > composed for the organ, I don't see how they can rightfully consider > > > themselves organists. > In exactly the same way that I considered myself a trombonist > after a month of playing in the Junior High School marching band. > > (rapidly departing from Bruce's camp on this one) >    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: "Roy Wilson" <royjaneann@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 21:20:21 PDT   This summer I have played the Bach Great A Minor Prelude and Fugue, the Great G Minor Prelude and Fugue, the Franck Chorale in A minor, = Mendelssohn Sonata No. 5, the two Bach D minor Toccatas, the Widor Toccata from the F major Symphony, plus works by Langlais, and Milhaud. I played the Charles =   Ives Variations on "America" on July 4. Generally, I play large concert pieces at the end of the service. I am lucky in that people stay and listen. I am also lucky in that the church has 3/44 Holtkamp tracker, = about 1992. I play the shorter pieces at the beginning of the service. I improvise CP's only when a new hymn is being introduced. Announcements = are made, followed by the "prelude" then the processional hymn. I had a small =   Reuter for 19 years previous to my appointment at St. John's and I am = having to learn all my three manual repertoire all over.   Lots of fun!   Roy Wilson Lubbock, TX St. John's Methodist     >From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: pipechat@pipechat.org (PipeChat) >Subject: Re: chorale preludes >Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 21:24:17 -0400 (EDT) > >Roy Wilson wrote: > > >I like Chorale Preludes and have favorites > > which I play frequently. People know them > > and for the most part enjoy them because of > > familiarity. > >Just out of curiosity..... how often do you play a major work for your >congregation, such as a large prelude & fugue, toccata or other such >piece? > >Bruce & the Baskerbeagles >~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~ > >I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will >Rogers > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     _______________________________________________________________ Get Free Email and Do More On The Web. Visit http://www.msn.com