PipeChat Digest #1019 - Saturday, August 7, 1999
 
Bach Manuscripts Found - ATC segment
  by "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com>
Re: Bach Manuscripts Found - ATC segment
  by "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com>
Good bye to rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Bach MS found
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Bach MS found
  by "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
no mail
  by "Bob North" <bnorth@intergate.bc.ca>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
God moves in mysterious ways (X-posted)
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD
  by "E. Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep"
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "mreeves@vzinet.com" <mreeves@vzinet.com>
 


(back) Subject: Bach Manuscripts Found - ATC segment From: "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 06:54:06 -0400   This is such an interesting music story!   Here is the link from the All Things Considered Page to a Real Audio File = of the program. This was on a page entitled "latest program" and looks like = it has a temporary file name and and therefore the link may not remain live = for long.   http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/atc/19990805.atc.05.ram   Here is the description of the segment:   Music written by Johann Sebastian Bach and his children has been = discovered in the Ukraine, more than 50 years after it was lost in the chaos of World War Two. Robert speaks with Christoph Wolff, Professor of Music and Dean = of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, about the find. Wolff says much of the music has never been played before and the discovery represents a significant expansion of 18th century music. (4:30)   S.D.G. Sue Smith   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Susan K. Smith, Organist & Webmaster Avon Congregational Church (Austin 2M - 5/8) Avon, CT www.avon-church.org www.smith-lawfirm.com suesmith@smith-lawfirm.com =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D      
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Manuscripts Found - ATC segment From: "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 07:06:36 -0400   I take it back - I looked the NPR site again. The ATC shows are archived = and therefore this link may be a permanent one. It's an interesting show and worth giving a listen to.   S.D.G. Sue Smith   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Susan K. Smith, Organist & Webmaster Avon Congregational Church Avon, CT Austin 2M/8R www.avon-church.org www.smith-lawfirm.com suesmith@smith-lawfirm.com =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     ----- Original Message ----- From: Sue Smith <SueSmith@Imagine.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: August 06, 1999 6:54 AM Subject: Bach Manuscripts Found - ATC segment     > This is such an interesting music story! > > Here is the link from the All Things Considered Page to a Real Audio = File of > the program. This was on a page entitled "latest program" and looks = like it > has a temporary file name and and therefore the link may not remain live for > long. > > http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/atc/19990805.atc.05.ram > > Here is the description of the segment: > > Music written by Johann Sebastian Bach and his children has been discovered > in the Ukraine, more than 50 years after it was lost in the chaos of = World > War Two. Robert speaks with Christoph Wolff, Professor of Music and Dean of > the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, about = the > find. Wolff says much of the music has never been played before and the > discovery represents a significant expansion of 18th century music. = (4:30) > > S.D.G. > Sue Smith > > = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Susan K. Smith, > Organist & Webmaster > Avon Congregational Church > (Austin 2M - 5/8) > Avon, CT > www.avon-church.org > www.smith-lawfirm.com > suesmith@smith-lawfirm.com > = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Good bye to rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 07:53:03 EDT   O.K., O.K., O.K. It was a delightful interlude to the chorale thread, though. Thank you, Rev. Ed, for your sense of humor. You are much appreciated for letting it flow. :-)   Stan Krider   DRAWKNOB askes us to: >Let's BLEEPING end it here.... >after all I thought this BLEEPING subject was dead weeks ago!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach MS found From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 11:44:52 -0400   Yes. Interesting indeed. But what is the import here? These are not, presumably, hitherto unknown works. Are they in fact MSS that have been published, even in this century? Is it just that these MSS have been rediscovered? or that some music we've never heard will now be heard?   Alan   ---------- >From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: Bach MS found >Date: Thu, Aug 5, 1999, 9:17 AM >   > Interesting article > > David  
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 06 Aug 1999 07:39:22 -0500   Bud/burgie wrote: >=20 > Robert Horton wrote: >=20 > > On Thu, 5 Aug 1999, Bud/chris wrote: > > > While most of the great organ literature WAS written for church > > Let me just point out that what we consider to be "great orga= n > > literature" is only the tip of the iceberg. Up until recently, organ= ists > > improvised music for services, and would write down noteworthy effort= s for > > the benefit of their students (e.g. Bach, Sweelinck) or to make money= by > > having it published (e.g. Grigny) > > I think it's a stretch to say that the folks you mention (JSB= , Widor, > > Vierne, and especially Franck) wrote their masterpieces for church us= e. > > The simple fact that the music actually made it onto paper means that > > these works go beyond the scope of the church. >=20 > Sorry, I disagree ... they might have WISHED for another venue, but all= the > organs (both in Bach's time and later) were in churches, except for a f= ew chamber > organs. The concert hall organ didn't come into existence until the 19t= h century, > unless you want to count Handel's theatre organs. >=20 > I might have misspoke concerning the Franck chorales ... I don't have m= y > references handy ... I don't recall which pieces were written for the T= rocadero > organ ... certainly Grand Piece Symphonique, Piece Heroique, and the Fi= nal, but I > forget which others, if any. Certainly the Priere was written for churc= h. >=20 > > > > > > > (I assume > > > you refer to the Bach Ps & Fs, the Franck Chorales, the Vierne and = Widor > > > Symphonies, the big Reger pieces, etc.), most of us have not the sl= ightest > > > use for them in present-day churches, particularly Anglican and Rom= an > > ... > > > And then there's the "instrument" ... I'm not ABOUT to subject myse= lf or > > > anybody else to ANYTHING that requires a solid organo pleno for mor= e than > > > thirty seconds on Le Grand Hammond. >=20 > > > > Well, all I can say is, you're imposing a very artificial arg= ument > > on yourself. Never mind the greats of organ music...You have an > > instrument, and a congregation that requires music. So, just do what > > organists have been doing for centuries...improvise! >=20 > Come by after Evensong on Wednesdays and I'll favor you with an improvi= sation on > the "Salve Regina", or "Lucis creator optime", or "Te lucis ante termin= um"; come > to Mattins at 6 a.m. on Fridays (yes, there are people who get up that = early) and > you're likely to hear an improvisation on "Nocte surgentes" or "Splendo= r paternae > gloriae", or whatever the seasonal or festal Office Hymns happen to be. >=20 > > No more having > > to futz around with drawknobs trying to imitate a Schnitger, just wor= k > > with the instrument at hand. Every now and again, you'll even come u= p > > with a little gem that you decide to write down in polished form to b= e > > added to the wonderful repertoire for the Hammond. >=20 > I have no intention of adding ANYTHING to the Hammond except whatever i= t takes to > facilitate its earliest demise. It is capable of accompanying the chant= s of the > Mass and the Office, and quiet improvisations ... anything else,=20   Some of these composers were more secular in outlook than one thinks.=20 Three of Franck's most famous pieces, including the Pi=E8ce Hero=EFque we= re written for the opening of the Cavaill=E9-Coll organ at the Trocadero in Paris, so might be called concert hall pieces. Handel would have preferred writing in a different genre, particularly Italian opera, but there just wasn't the demand for this in eighteenth century England. I think the bottom line is that organ music is organ music, whether sacred or secular.   John Speller, St. Louis, Mo.  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach MS found From: "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 09:08:09 -0400   > Yes. Interesting indeed. But what is the import here? These are not, > presumably, hitherto unknown works. Are they in fact MSS that have been > published, even in this century? Is it just that these MSS have been > rediscovered? or that some music we've never heard will now be heard?   According to the ATC story, there are 5000 MSs, some of which are unpublished. 500 of them are "Bach Family" materials, including ancestors = of JSB. Prof. Wolff did say that it was possible, but only remotely so, that = a previously unknown Ms of JSB would be among them. Much is the music of Bach's two oldest sons, Wilhem Friedrich Bach and C.P.E. Bach. The MSs are complete and in very good condition. There is a lot of unpublished music = of W.F.B. and C.P.E. Bach in the collection. I got the impression from Prof. Wolff comments that the study so far was preliminary and that he was initially most interested in identifying which collections, previously thought to be lost, were in the archive.   An interesting question is whether they will discover that something previously attributed to JSB was actually written by one of his ancestors = or sons.   I would also like to know how the archive will be managed, who will have access and what the plan is for study and publication.   This will be an interesting story to follow as it develops.   S.D.G. Sue Smith   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Susan K. Smith, Organist & Webmaster Avon Congregational Church Avon, CT Austin 2M/8R www.avon-church.org www.smith-lawfirm.com suesmith@smith-lawfirm.com =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D        
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 11:46:07 EDT   In a message dated 8/6/99 12:07:32 AM Pacific Daylight Time, = DRAWKNOB@aol.com writes:   << Neil, you're a true friend... Ah, our youthful indiscretions.... I wish =   that this was the worst of them... but I'm afraid not! >>   John--I'd love to hear about your youthful indiscretions (and will respond =   with mine, if you're interested, or perhaps more recent escapades), particularly those involving your organ. BTW, is "Drawknob" a pipe organ moniker, or does it refer to "drawing your knob" as in stroking, etc.?   Steve  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: Administrator <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 10:50:23 -0500   Folks   I hate to really put limits on topics but I think this one has run its course and from the last posting to the list I think that anyone that wants to continue it needs to take it to private email.   David **************************************** David Scribner Co-Owner / Technical Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org 850-478-9635 mailto:david@blackiris.com  
(back) Subject: no mail From: bnorth@intergate.bc.ca (Bob North) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 09:04:14 -0700 (PDT)   no mail    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 14:29:29 -0400   Well, I'm back home after a trip to New Jersey to see my daughter and her baby. I see you've been talking about those chorales. I have books of them. Would one of you more educated people, or in a different venue, tell = me what you use the things for? I play in a union Protestant church. The chorales are too short for a prelude or offertory, too long for an interlude. There seem to be a whole lot of them, so apparently they fit = in some other type of service than this one----prelude, offertory, postlude, = 3 hymns, 2 choir pieces, standard responses from back of hymn book. I use interlude music sometimes too, when needed, but the chorales don't work = very well for that either, I tried it already. Hate to appear ignorant, but the best cure for that is to ask = questions, so I'm asking. The only success I have had is with the Parish Organist, playing the hymn first, then the chorale version, then the hymn again, but if they are variations on hymns, they are mostly hymns I am not familiar with. We are currently using a book called Hymns for the Living Church, it's been around for some time. Mostly what I would call old standards. I gather other denominations are using a group of hymns that are largely different? This is Baptist, Presbyterian, and Methodist mostly, (and some who aren't too sure!) Smiles-----and what a nice change in the weather! Diane S. (straight@infoblvd.net)    
(back) Subject: God moves in mysterious ways (X-posted) From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Aug 1999 11:50:46 -0700   Arrived at church at 5:15 a.m. to make coffee, finish the Psalm for Sunday, run it off, and rehearse with the men for 6 a.m. Mattins ... the power was off. St. Matthew's has no windows, except two in the northwest corner behind the choir area. So the men arrived and scrounged candle stubs from the sacristy, put them in coffee mugs, and scattered them about the chancel and nave. I experienced a first ... accompanying an all-Gregorian service on the piano ... had to arpeggiate the chords under the reciting notes so they wouldn't die away. About ten people in the congregation. The men acquitted themselves well on their first outing with the authentic melody of Te Deum, AND sight-read the Psalms for the Sixth Morning (I didn't have them ready for Wednesday's chant class) in semi-darkness.   The end result was exquisite, the piano notwithstanding. The men were scared, so they didn't bellow or rush (as is usually their wont after half a pot of coffee). It was all actually very moving ... just wish I'd remembered it was Hiroshima Day ... should have ... it falls on the Feast of the Transfiguration ... what a horrible irony, THAT transfiguration.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 15:20:08 -0400 (EDT)   >...use portions of great works for service music How true! i have a wedding coming up in which the bride is enterting to the lovely march section from the Reubke Sonata on the 94th Psalm. It is also a lovely prelude. This is the type of music that I primarily use for voluntaries.   >If you don't know the next to last movement > from Widor's Fifth, you have missed > something gorgeous. Indeed! Another truism!!!!   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 15:31:47 -0400 (EDT)     >While most of the great organ literature WAS > written for church ... most of us have not the > slightest use for them in present-day > churches, particularly Anglican and Roman > organists who are lucky to get a bathroom > break between services ... my Sunday > schedule is 8-9:15-10:30 ... I really don't think Anglican and RC are that close when it comes to Mass schedules, since there are many more RC's and fewer RC parishs. Your situation is, of course an exception. At my previous RC position the Sunday schedule was 7, 8:30, (10:15 rehearsal) and 11 am. I played literature for all Masses.   >And then there's the "instrument" ... I'm not > ABOUT to subject myself or anybody else to > ANYTHING that requires a solid organo pleno > for more than thirty seconds on Le Grand > Hammond. This is, of course, a viable excuse. I wouldn't bother playing anything but hymns were I unfortunate enough to have to play a "thing".   >and a great many people are able to pass > themselves off as organists who really are > not, in the truest sense. =A0 If one does not play > the great literature composed for the organ, I > don't see how they can rightfully consider > themselves organists. I'm afraid you have caught me in an overstatement arising from the heat of the moment. There are many people who do not play great literature but exercise their craft in a most respectable way. They are indeed worthy to wear the "organist" badge (or purple heart!).     Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 15:35:11 -0400 (EDT)     >Depriving the Couperin, de Grigny, etc. of their > chant verses is to deprive them of half the > music the composer intended.... Perhaps true. However, I have never heard a performance of the Couperin Masses with alternatum chanting in which the chanting seemed important to the versets. Perhaps I have never heard this done with the actual Mass setting for which the music was written.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD From: "E. Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Fri, 06 Aug 1999 17:19:09 +0100   Seems to me you should be able to do something with the idea of "Little Flower" - but no particular piece of literature comes to mind. Anyone know of any pieces with names of flowers in their titles?   Or perhaps a collection of short, possibly even little known, works and call them "little flowers".   Too hokey? Maybe. But a memorable connection when you go to the music store to look for the CD or when people hear about it by word of mouth.   Margo  
(back) Subject: Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 17:52:45 -0500   >Seems to me you should be able to do something with the idea of "Little >Flower" - but no particular piece of literature comes to mind. Anyone >know of any pieces with names of flowers in their titles? > >Or perhaps a collection of short, possibly even little known, works and >call them "little flowers".   What about "Petites Fleurs Musicales" of Tournemire?   David    
(back) Subject: Re: Repertoire/Theme Ideas For Shrine Kilgen CD From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Fri, 06 Aug 1999 16:42:20 -0700   > Anyone > know of any pieces with names of flowers in their titles? > "Lied to the Flowers" by Flor Peeters (Lied Symphony) ... very nice piece.   Jason McGuire  
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: "Sue Smith" <SueSmith@Imagine.com> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 22:20:28 -0400   > Would one of you more educated people, or in a different venue, tell me > what you use the things for? I play in a union Protestant church. The > chorales are too short for a prelude or offertory, too long for an > interlude.   My church now uses a format where the announcements are first and then = there is a prelude with all seated and quiet, in preparation for worship. With this format, shorter is better --the target is 2 min. give or take -- and = I have begun to revisit the baroque and neo-baroque CP's for short preludes. Whenever possible, I put the hymn number in the bulletin and some people follow along. When not in the hymnal, I put in the first two lines of the text.   For a pre-service prelude of 5 to 7 min you can cluster them. Play 2 or 3 from the same composer. 2 or 3 from different composers on the same c.f. You get the idea.   By the way, does everyone know this web page:   http://www.dfel.com/midistuff/midi.htm   A lot of samples of CP's.   S.D.G. Sue Smith   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Susan K. Smith, Organist & Webmaster Avon Congregational Church Avon, CT Austin 2M/8R www.avon-church.org www.smith-lawfirm.com suesmith@smith-lawfirm.com =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 22:30:38 -0400 (EDT)   Steve, I will ask you to please make sexual references privately. It's not fair to those of us who don't want to read them to send them publicly. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 22:31:57 -0400 (EDT)   2 that came to mind...for the animal lovers:   1) Rescue the Parakeet 2) Lead On, Oh Kinky Turtle   --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding rehearsal from HELL, er, "Bleep" From: Administrator <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 21:42:49 -0500   >Steve, I will ask you to please make sexual references privately. It's >not fair to those of us who don't want to read them to send them >publicly. --Neil   Neil   Excuse me but your note was out of line. i have taken care of it privately and if you had a problem you should have emailed either Pete or myself about it - NOT posted the above to the list.   We try to be very easy going but we also take care of LOTS of problems privately and I really don't appreciate your trying to take over the jobs of the list owners.   David   **************************************** David Scribner Co-Owner / Technical Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org 850-478-9635 mailto:david@blackiris.com  
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: mreeves@vzinet.com (mreeves@vzinet.com) Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 22:14:49 -0000   I do use CP's quite often, primarily because they are short. My church = has began doing the "seated silence" thing as soon as the "prelude" begins....and they also, due to the minister's instructions, remain = seated through the benediction response and the Postlude.   The congregation is just wanting to get out of there so they can beat the Baptists to the restaurants to get the better seats, but, I appreciate = their patience, but don't want to push it too far.   Mark Reeves Dir of Music/Organist - First UMC, Canton (fulltime) Temp. Choir Director at Canton ISD (fulltime) I don't have a life....