PipeChat Digest #1020 - Saturday, August 7, 1999
 
"Fine Arts" Site Announce LIST (fwd)
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
Recital Announcement (X-POSTED)
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@ACADMN.MERCER.EDU>
Bach MS found
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Handel's theatre organs.
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
pipe organ popularity
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Oops! RE: Recital Announcement (X-POSTED)
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@ACADMN.MERCER.EDU>
Re: pipe organ popularity
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Handel's theatre organs.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Digital Cameras
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: pipe organ popularity
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Handel's theatre organs.
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: pipe organ popularity
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: Digital Cameras
  by "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: pipe organ popularity
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: pipe organ popularity
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns
  by "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net>
Re: Digital Cameras
  by <GHamil9709@aol.com>
Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: Kilgens
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Christmas Choir/organ repertoire
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Digital Cameras
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net>
Re: chorale preludes
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Christmas Choir/organ repertoire
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Christmas Choir/organ repertoire
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Kilgens
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: "Fine Arts" Site Announce LIST (fwd) From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 06:45:37 -0700 (MST)   Are there Pipe Chat listers with websites to promote? I know the AcoustiCDigest.com site has a page devoted to organ sites on their Classical Music LINKS page.   ---rac   Do you have a website dealing with the 'FINE ARTS'? > You can promote it to the world at: > http://onelist.com/subscribe.cgi/AAArtsURLs >=20 > Specifics are posted at the ONElist subscription > window at that URL... > no charge, no spamming please. > (A MODERATED List) > _____________________________________________________________   =3D=3D=3D Music Directories: http://AcoustiCDigest.com NEW CDs: http://newCDnews.com _____________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com     --------------------------- ONElist Sponsor ----------------------------   How do you enter ONElist=92s WEEKLY DRAWING for $100? By joining the FRIENDS & FAMILY program. For details, go to http://www.onelist.com/info/onereachsplash3.html   ------------------------------------------------------------------------ NEW Compact Discs: http://newCDnews.com Go to the Internet Classical Music = Index at http://acoustiCDigest.com=20    
(back) Subject: Recital Announcement (X-POSTED) From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@ACADMN.MERCER.EDU> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 09:51:53 -0400   Hello, all-   I am announcing a recital for my friend and fellow lister Jonathan Ryan. He will be playing at Myers Park Presbyterian Church on 15 August 1999 at *:00 PM. The church is in Charlotte, North Carolina. His program will consist of:   Buxtehude: Pr=E4ludium und Fuge in g minor, BuxWV 149   Clearambault: Suite de Pr=E8mier Ton   Basse et Dessus de Trompette R=E9cits de Cromorne et de Cornet S=E9par=E9 Dialogu=E9 sur les Grands Jeux   Franck: Fantaisie en ut majeur   Messaien: La Nativit=E9 du Seigneur   IX. Dieu Parmi Nous   J. Alain: Trois Pi=E8ces pour Grand Orgue   II. L=E9 Jardin suspendu   Haendel: Orgel-Konzert, op. 4, no. 4   I. Allegro Stephen Karr, guest accompanist (two of us on the bench...will be a mite cozy)   Guilmant: Sonate no. 1, op. 42   II. Pastorale III. Final   Main Organ by Casavant Fr=E8res Limit=E9e, Op. 2625, 1961   Jonathan is an excellent organist. He studies with Andre Lash in Charlotte. He will be a senior in high school this coming school year. It promises to be an exciting and moving program.   -Stephen      
(back) Subject: Bach MS found From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 09:55:20 EDT   Any P. D. Q. Bach material found??   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Handel's theatre organs. From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 09:55:21 EDT   Tell me more about Handel's theatre organs. I assume they are not like the =   current horseshoes, but how were they different? Were they built in = concert halls designed for entertainment rather than serious worship or formal = music?   Stan Krider   With so many forwards, I THINK Robert Horton wrote:   > Sorry, I disagree ... they might have WISHED for another venue, but all = the > organs (both in Bach's time and later) were in churches, except for a = few chamber > organs. The concert hall organ didn't come into existence until the 19th =   century, > unless you want to count Handel's theatre organs.  
(back) Subject: pipe organ popularity From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 09:55:48 EDT   Dear list, Concerning the lack of people interested in the music of the pipe organ, = we lament that people no longer flock to the venues tpo hear this great = musical instrument played.   "Why?", I asked myself.   My answer, after some thought, surprised me.   I am very reluctant to enter into the sanctuaries of churches whose faith = and rituals are different than mine.   I then examined why I am reluctant. I found that I, in the pipe organ servicing vocation, enter these churches with comfort, sit at the grand consoles and even play songs that I enjoy listening to on those = instruments. (I am NOT a trained organist, so I play popular music in what I perceive = to be a classical, restrained manner. That is NOT where this concern is = going, however.)   Roman Catholic, Jewish, Baptist, Church of the Brethren and Episcopal all have beautiful architecture designed to inspire the observer to reverence, =   and each time I enter the sanctuary, I do so with deepest respect for the worship and ritual that occurs therein on the Holy Days.   Since I am comfortable in the physical building, why am I not as = comfortable to enter during the times of worship? I fear my actions, or improper lack of them at the appropriate times, = would disrupt the worship service in progress, therefore, I choose to not = attend.   Here is the QUESTION:   Are outsiders welcome to attend worship services for the sole purpose of listening to the organ music? Do congregations welcome outsiders to attend their worship services if the =   worship service is secondary to the visitor's reason for attending?   E.G. I would eagerly attend services during which several of you are = playing simply to hear the wonderful musical compositions you delight in = describing. Would I be welcomed in your sanctuaries? Or would I be ostracized by = glaring from the "regulars"?   Stan Krider    
(back) Subject: Oops! RE: Recital Announcement (X-POSTED) From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@ACADMN.MERCER.EDU> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 10:10:48 -0400   Hi again-   In my previous message, "*:00 P.M." should have read "8:00 P.M." I have = no idea why my fingers are acting like this, and why my eyes didn't catch it. = Oh well, I guess it happens to all of us.   -Stephen      
(back) Subject: Re: pipe organ popularity From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 10:18:38 -0400 (EDT)   Stan, I think in most instances no one would know whether you were a visitor or spectator. My experience has been that all places I've visited have been welcoming an cordial, even my favorite stuffy Episcopalians who waited until the coffee hour to be friendly. As lone as you are not obviously a spectator, i.e. sitting only without participating, there should be no problem. Most churches welcome visitors, I think.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   I love a dog. =A0 He does nothing for political reasons. =A0 -- Will Rogers    
(back) Subject: Re: Handel's theatre organs. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 09:46:39 -0500   KriderSM@aol.com wrote: > > Tell me more about Handel's theatre organs. I assume they are not like = the > current horseshoes, but how were they different? Were they built in = concert > halls designed for entertainment rather than serious worship or formal = music?   There were a number of theaters in England with organs, such as Drury Lane Theatre in London, or the Assembly Rooms at Bath and there were also a number in the concert halls in the London pleasure gardens such as Vauxhall Gardens. As far as I have been able to discover they were indistinguishable from church organs. By the middle of the nineteenth century concert hall organs were starting to become larger and louder than church organs, but it was really only in the time of Hope-Jones at the turn of the present century that the theatre organ started developing as a separate instrument.   John Speller, St. Louis, Mo.  
(back) Subject: Digital Cameras From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 11:56:37 EDT   List Members!   I am in the market for a Digital Camera for documenting TO Organ = restoration and need some feedback and recommendations from any of you who own one. I =   figured, what better way to get a first hand consumer report, than to hear =   from individuals who have purchased and used one.   Specifically, I am interested in what features of the camera you like or = do not like. What do you think about the resolution, clarity, sharpness, focus of your particular camera? Can the data be downloaded to a computer? Is it user friendly? Price?   I know from past experience with this list, that there is a vast = storehouse of knowledge out there for me to tap on. Thanks in advance for your = opinion.   Cordially, Phil Lyons, Jr.  
(back) Subject: Re: pipe organ popularity From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 09:48:01 -0700       KriderSM@aol.com wrote:   > (snip) > > I am very reluctant to enter into the sanctuaries of churches whose = faith and > rituals are different than mine. > > (snip)   > Here is the QUESTION: > > Are outsiders welcome to attend worship services for the sole purpose of > listening to the organ music?   They are at St. Matthew's ... we provide a "Visitors' Liturgy Book" with = detailed instructions on how to follow the Liturgy, with a disclaimer in the front = that says something to the effect that you're welcome to participate, but = you're also welcome to sit and observe; if you need help finding your way through the = Prayer Book and Hymnal, any member of the congregation will be glad to assist = you. We don't ask people why they're in church; we're just glad to see them.   > > Do congregations welcome outsiders to attend their worship services if = the > worship service is secondary to the visitor's reason for attending?   Hey, even our OWN people come to church for all sorts of reasons ... = social, political, religious ... why should visitors be any different? You might = want to come to St. Matthew's to hear the choir and people sing the Liturgy ... = they do a good job of it ... I can't imagine that ANYBODY would want to come to hear = the ORGAN (grin), but there might be a Hammond fan out there who would, since = it's a very unusual Hammond, and not many were made. And certainly it has to be = the only Hammond of this particular model that plays Anglican High Mass every = Sunday (grin).     > > > E.G. I would eagerly attend services during which several of you are = playing > simply to hear the wonderful musical compositions you delight in = describing. > Would I be welcomed in your sanctuaries?   Yep.   > Or would I be ostracized by glaring > from the "regulars"?   Nope. Anytime the Liturgy does anything out of the ordinary, half the = REGULARS get lost ... they think they don't need to read the bulletin (grin). And = my congregation is about 70% low-church and 30% high-church, so they don't do everything the same way at the same time anyway. Besides, they're supposed = to be about their prayers, not staring at people (grin).   > > > Stan Krider >   In a small church like ours you would be NOTICED (and be made welcome); = in a large church, you could simply slide into a pew and listen and nobody = would pay any attention.   Cheers,   Bud St. Matthew's-in-the-Mall Newport Beach CA USA    
(back) Subject: Re: Handel's theatre organs. From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 09:56:09 -0700       KriderSM@aol.com wrote:   > Tell me more about Handel's theatre organs. I assume they are not like = the > current horseshoes, but how were they different? Were they built in = concert > halls designed for entertainment rather than serious worship or formal = music? > > Stan Krider >   They were no different than English church organs of the time ... they = were small, usually one-manual, with no pedals. They served the same function = in the orchestra as the harpsichord ... continuo playing and the occasional = concerto. It is recorded that Handel played his organ concerti before and after the performances of his oratorios, which were given in theatres during Lent as = a way of getting around the prohibition of operas and plays during that sacred = season. One presumes (since theatres HAD organs) that they were also used for = popular "entertainments".   I don't have a specific stoplist at hand, but we do know that Handel = advised the owner of the Great Packington organ NOT to have the stops divided, and = that a second manual was added to Handel's original specification.   A typical period stoplist:   GREAT (from GG below our low C on the manuals, which gave more of a bass = effect)   Open Diapason 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Principal 4' (Recorder 4') Fifteenth 2' (Sexquialtera) (Trumpet)   CHAIRE   Stopped Diapason 8' Principal 4' Fifteenth 2' (Cremona 8')   (Coupler from the Chaire to the Great ... not always present)   Stops in parenthesis added in larger organs.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: pipe organ popularity From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 13:49:41 -0400   Come on over. You won't be half as noticeable as a little one = crawling around under all the pews and coming up here and there to inspect = different people. Or when one of the kids drops a hymnal on the floor--always right in the middle of a prayer or sermon. Or when somebody walks out with a = kid having a crying session. Or like the last time the fire siren went off and a fourth of the congregation and choir tore out the door-----and the minister, who was in charge of the tanker, stood there looking indecisive, and the rest of them looked inquiringly at the organist (me), who is also fire and ambulance crew. I looked at the pastor, he looked at me, I decided they had plenty of help and played a verse of something or other quietly for filler, and we continued on with the service. Most of them came back in before it was over. AH! This being dignified can be tough! But I've been here a lot = longer than he had, and I knew what would be happening, and that somebody would = be back to get both of us, and anybody else willing to help, if we were = really needed. If you can play popular music, why not work up a couple of easy hymns = or classics you can play when you get a chance? It's all music, same notes, same black and white keys. Amazing Grace, Blessed Assurance, something = like that. Church people live in the real world, and churches are not usually closed communities. All kinds of people come to weddings and funerals in them, and lots of people bring boyfriends, girlfriends, relatives, who = don't know the routine. No big deal. Want some fun? We have a Thanksgiving = Eve service together with the Catholics, our church one year, theirs the next. Nobody!! is sure what to do, including the priest and pastor! They've = been doing it for many years, but the priests and pastors come and go, so the people just do their thing and the guys up in front act confused. You just sit in the back and act confused and nobody will pay any attention------or else they'll hand you a book, smile, and cue you when to stand up and sit down, and invite you back afterwards. Who knows? You might find a place you'd really like to come back to? Diane Straight Organist/Accompanist Almond Union of Churches Almond, New York (Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist, and anybody else who wants to come. There's a small Roman Catholic church on the other end of town for the = rest. Also an evangelical batch up on the hill, 7th day Baptists in the next = town, and the Lighthouse church who has plywood over all the windows. And = within the area there's at least one of almost every kind you can think of, plus = a few oddballs. I know these people, you'd be welcome at any of them.)    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Cameras From: "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 14:01:54 -0500   I am also interested in information on digital cameras....please make me a copy addressee on any responses to Phil.   regards,   Jon C. Habermaas opus1100@theatreorgans.com   -----Original Message----- From: ORGANUT@aol.com <ORGANUT@aol.com> To: cinemaorgans@mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk <cinemaorgans@mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk> Cc: organchat@onelist.com <organchat@onelist.com>; pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org>; Theatreorgans-l@theatreorgans.com <Theatreorgans-l@theatreorgans.com> Date: Saturday, August 07, 1999 10:57 AM Subject: Digital Cameras     >List Members! > > I am in the market for a Digital Camera for documenting TO Organ restoration >and need some feedback and recommendations from any of you who own one. ance for your opinion. > >Cordially, >Phil Lyons, Jr.        
(back) Subject: Re: pipe organ popularity From: Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 15:31:31 -0400   STRAIGHT wrote:   > Come on over. You won't be half as noticeable as a little one = crawling > around under all the pews and coming up here and there to inspect = different > people. Or when one of the kids drops a hymnal on the floor--always = right > in the middle of a prayer or sermon. Or when somebody walks out with a = kid > having a crying session.   Well . . .   I placed music for the soloist on the keydesk at my last "regular" job.   During the first hymn, "Joyful joyful we . . ." the music fell on the = floor. The pastor, a kind, helpful man, placed the music back on the keydesk, but = now out of reach.   No problem, I just stood up and retrieved the music--with something VERY = close to full organ drawn on the pedals, Great to Pedal coupled, full Great . . = .     Charles    
(back) Subject: Re: pipe organ popularity From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 15:48:26 -0400   OOOOOOOOOOOPPS!!! Still laughing! Diane    
(back) Subject: Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns From: "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 17:23:53 -0500   How about "Immoral, Invisible"...   :)   -Mark     ----- Original Message ----- From: N Brown <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, August 06, 1999 9:31 PM Subject: Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns     > 2 that came to mind...for the animal lovers: > > 1) Rescue the Parakeet > 2) Lead On, Oh Kinky Turtle > > --Neil > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Cameras From: GHamil9709@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 19:30:03 EDT   Greetings, Phil. I've been following your activity from the postings on = the List.   Have you heard anything further or lately in reference to the "Auction Fiasco?"   I am waiting for you to gather all the info about digital cameras... and = now give you my 2 Cents Worth on the subject. I have been using the Sony Mavica FD7 for some time and continue to be completely fascinated with it. True, it does not come up to the standard = of a good 35 mm as far as sharpness and detail is concerned but the ease of = use and ability to print out photos immediately on plain paper ... and to = modify the photo with software -- and the use of the floppy disk makes it my personal choice. I simply do not use my 35 mm camera at all these days.   I'll be glad to answer any specific questions, Phil. You will get all = kinds of responses on this subject. gene hamilton -- Indianapolis, IN   [Unable to display image]  
(back) Subject: Re: Top Ten Retitled Hymns From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 20:01:09 -0400 (EDT)   Then there's "Take my life and let it be." Period. (Repunctuated rather than retitled.)   Lutheran corruptions: For "Prepare the way, O Zion" - "Pull up your sox, O Zion".   "Es ist genug". Translation: "I've had it, Lord."   "Herr, ich habe misgehandelt" - " Lord, I've gone and botched it again."   And, during the Missouri Synod theological cleansings of the 70s: "Chief of sinners though I be, Jacob Preus is worse than me." (Jake Preus was the president of the LCMS at the time of Die Grosse Unpleasantness in that denomination.) Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Kilgens From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 20:39:55 EDT   In a message dated 8/7/99 6:16:50 AM Eastern Daylight Time, fastcat@pacifier.com writes:   << Well, with all the hype going on right now, let's not forget to take = into account that for all intents and purposes, Wicks were not as good as Kilgens and Kilgens were not the best. >>   As we all know, every builder had good and bad. I have heard many say, after the installation of the St. Patrick's Cathedral Kilgen in 1929, that =   Kilgen was to the Roman Church what Skinner was to the Episcopal Church.   I think it is safe to say, that the larger, custom, "special" instruments = had maybe a little more loving care and attention put into them than, say, the =   run of the mill, mid-sized "assembly line" or "catalog" instruments, and I = am referring to all builders here- not just Kilgen.   Having played a few Kilgens of different vintages and sizes, both George Kilgen and Son instruments as well as the later Eugene Kilgen instruments (before the company closed), the George Kilgen organs were far superior in =   craftsmanship and tonal splendor.   (OK- you all KNEW what was coming next). The National Shrine Kilgen was = the second largest instrument built by the St. Louis firm and, according to = Mrs. Alice Kilgen Fiedler (granddaughter of George Kilgen) and Robert Mitchell = who was on the Shrine's installation team in 1933, the Shrine instrument was always held in very high esteem by the Kilgens themselves and considered = (by them) to be one of their very best).   Scott F. Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Christmas Choir/organ repertoire From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 20:50:30 EDT   As seems to be the tradition in the Roman Church, predominantly, choirs = and organists present "mini-concerts" frequently on Christmas Eve immediately preceding the Midnight Mass.   I cannot believe that the summer is already waning to a close but it is already time to plan ahead for the upcoming fall choir season which will, (UGH!), eventually lead to Advent and the Christmas Liturgies.   I am interested in repertoire that might be appropriate to fit into the "mini-concert", pre-Midnight-Mass category. Last year we alternated the organ with instruments for 30 minutes and then for 30 minutes the choir = sang a variety of carols with the congregation, Christmas anthems and motets.   Needless to say, the St. Saens "Christmas Oratorio" pops into mind as does =   J.S. Bach's Cantata 142 (I think it's 142) "For Us A Child Is Born."   Does anyone else have other ideas that will work?   Looking forward to seeing what others do and what other s suggest.   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, Michiagn  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Cameras From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net> Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 20:57:25 -0700   I just purchased a Sony Mavica FD88 and am thrilled with it. Everyday is = a new experience in what it will do. Being able to take the disk and insert it directly into the PC and print was the feature that sold me on this model. even though at $900 my hand shook as I signed the AMEX slip. I recommend it wholeheartedly.   Sand Lawn       >List Members! > > I am in the market for a Digital Camera for documenting TO Organ restoration >and need some feedback and recommendations from any of you who own one. = I        
(back) Subject: Re: chorale preludes From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 22:24:41 -0400 (EDT)   Bruce, I can't remember if it was Couperin, but James David Christie treated us to a stunning service of alternating verses at the Region I convention in Worcester Mass last month. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Choir/organ repertoire From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 7 Aug 1999 22:45:12 -0400 (EDT)   Scott, one year for our pre-service Musicale (as I call it), I had my teen choir sing several Ch'mas anthems built around the theme, "Lullabies for the Christ Child". I did that as a balance to the "splendor and glory" that would erupt at 11:00 p.m. Just an idea. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Choir/organ repertoire From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 21:00:20 -0700   I've done the Bach ... it's easy enough ... there's also a lovely syrupy = cantata by Clokey called "The Christ Child" (I think), but it's probably out of = print and I've lost my copy long since. I think the Saint-Saens is BORING = (grin).   Lubeck - Christmas Cantata Schutz - The Christmas Story (?) Buxtehude - In Dulci Jubilo Berlioz - L'Enfant du Christ (!!??) - I can't spell French Mendelssohn - There Shall A Star From Jacob Come Forth (but that's for = Epiphany)   Vivaldi - Gloria (yawn) Respighi (sp?) - Laud to the Nativity Pinkham - Christmas Cantata Michael Haydn - Tui sunt caeli   Franck - Pastorale Vierne - Pastorale from the First Symphony - I did play the whole symphony = one year Roger-Ducasse - Pastorale (that would be LOVELY on your organ)   I've never really had to face this, since we always did a big Latin = Ordinary with orchestra and that was pretty much that ... one year we did sing = Christmas Matins (the whole nine yards, in Latin) before the Midnight Mass with all = the lovely polyphonic Responsories like "O Magnum Mysterium", but that's = pretty austere ... Old St. Mary's was a VERY special place, and they loved things = like that.   At St. Matthew's, our one and only Christmas Mass is at 5 p.m. on = Christmas Eve .... they pile in, they pile out; we sing an anthem for the prelude, an = anthem for the Offertory, a High Mass with congregational Ordinary and polyphonic Propers, and every carol in the book ... end of story. Not very exciting = ... I may sing First Evensong of Christmas before the Mass this year just to = have something to do. They're a lot bigger on Holy Week and Easter than they = are on Christmas, for some reason ...   I need to go to BED ... if I think of anything else, I'll post tomorrow = night after I wake up.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Kilgens From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 21:10:27 -0700   I've also been told that the quality went down after St. Patrick's and the cathedral in St. Louis precisely BECAUSE they landed so many contracts on = the strength of those organs, and they simply couldn't spend the time on the installation and voicing, particularly of smaller instruments.   I've always been VERY fond of the OLD Kilgens ... very suave and = sophisticated voicing, and ensembles that lock together like burnished old brass.   Cheers,   Bud