PipeChat Digest #1048 - Sunday, August 29, 1999
 
Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted)
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Gabriel Pierne'
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: more Fox
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted)
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted)
  by <prswank@impop.bellatlantic.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1047 - 08/28/99
  by "dave" <dpitzer@sonic.net>
things tubular, gnarly, killer and otherwise
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 18:48:57 -0500   Bud/Burgie wrote:   > It is; that's what we do now, not only Psalms, but other passages of = Scripture > ... I particularly like chanting the eucharistic discourses from St. = John's > Gospel on occasion. But we need something shorter ... it seems a shame = to hack > up Psalms or Scripture ... we'd been accustomed to chanting great chunks = lasting > 10-20 minutes depending on the number of communicants (our Communion = goes VERY > slowly, even with a Deacon to give the chalice).   Well, I was actually thinking, rather than pointing scripture, to pointing = such things as the prayer entitled "For all Poor, Homeless, and Neglected Folk" = from p. 599 of the 1928 BCP, or "For the Absent" from 596, or "For those we Love" = from 597.   As a related aside, it has been my experience that many people in the = congregation do not know the full resources of their worship aids. My late in-laws who = used the '28 prayer book for many years, never knew these were included, until I = asked if they used them in '74 or '75. They each had a "pocket sized" edition of = the 1928 BCP, and a pew sized one on a shelf in the living room.   Also, you could similarly set parts of various litanies, my St. = Augustine's Prayer Book (Holy Cross Publications) has a litany on the Name of Jesus which = could be started, and as much--or as little of used as needed. One of my favorite = texts, BTW, is 'Strengthen for Service, Lord the hands that holy things have = taken". I especially like the tune to which it appears in H82, which, although is = intended in the congregational edition for unison singing, I provide copies of the = accompaniment to my choir to sing unaccompanied. The text also appears in the Lutheran = Book of Worship, to a different tune.   Finally, Oxford, Novello, and some of the other Brit publishers (OK, = Novello is now owned by Music Sales out of New York, as is Chester) publish a number of = prayers (Prayer of King Henry VI, Prayer of Richard of Chichester, Prayer of King = Charles (there's a number here, but I don't remember what it is) which would be = suitable, but would cost "real money".   > BTW, if you'd like some of our > settings, I'd be happy to send them to you .. we have BUCKETS, and I = just > finished filing them AGAIN, so I can get to them.   Yes, I would like to see them at some point. However, and I have been = meaning for a couple of days now, to refer you to this, or this to you, I would suggest = as an archive for your materials, as we discussed in earlier exchange, to = consider the Choral Public Domain Library (www.cpdl.org). If it ever happens that I = decide to publish any of my material, (consisting presently of a few anglican chant = melodies which I am reworking at the moment), it may very well be here.   pax      
(back) Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 19:19:18 -0500   Have you tried looking at the Choral Public Domain Library? It has a website at <http://www.cpdl.org> where you can look at and download hundreds of anthems of all kinds, print them out and duplicate them legally to your heart's content.   John Speller, St. Louis, Mo.  
(back) Subject: Re: Gabriel Pierne' From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 19:54:03 -0500   I saved the messages regarding the Pierne, because I too am interested in responses. Doesn't the first movement ask for addition of reeds halfway through? I don't have my copy with me, so am guessing, but I am beginning work on the whole thing for a recital in November. Also, on the = Cantilene, I float the melody on 8 and 4 foot flutes over an 8' gemshorn = accompaniment - it turns out nicely.   (If you will recall, my small church organ has no reeds, so I do weird things to make a reed-like effect when the music will fit on the organ, = and otherwise just drool all over the music and don't play it there.)   Am interested in what people do with the Scherzando.   Regards,   Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: more Fox From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 21:49:30 -0400 (EDT)   Ahem. Fox a so-so musician? not.    
(back) Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 22:01:14 -0400 (EDT)   I like "Supper of the Lord" (Rosania, I think   neil    
(back) Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) From: prswank@impop.bellatlantic.net Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 22:20:13 -0400   Thank you John for pointing out the link to the Choral Public Domain Library I just went there, downloaded a printout of a Faure work, and downloaded the midi file of it as well. Very helpful.   Paul R. Swank Organist Retired (or is that Retried?)   John L. Speller wrote:   > Have you tried looking at the Choral Public Domain Library? It has a > website at <http://www.cpdl.org> where you can look at and download > hundreds of anthems of all kinds, print them out and duplicate them > legally to your heart's content. > > John Speller, > St. Louis, Mo. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1047 - 08/28/99 From: dave <dpitzer@sonic.net> Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 19:22:36 -0700     > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: more Fox >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 11:20:36 -0700 > > >I remember Fox making an impassioned appeal to save the large four-manual = E.M. >Skinner in First Congregational Church in St. Petersburg, FL, following a =   >recital >there in the late '50s. Unfortunately, it was replaced by a large = @#$%^&*, and >the pipe organ later burned in storage. He was a champion of the best of >Skinner >work, and had a large personal collection of Skinner ranks, some of which =   >went to >the Silica Basilica organ, which he designed, but didn't live to play.       You speak as though E. M. Skinner organs are to be revered and cherished. As far as the Silica Basilica organ is concerned ...I'm not familiar with it, I've never heard of it, actually so I can't comment.     > > 2. As far as his technical prowess, his being able to "play the = fingers off > > of any other organist"...probably true. And we should, in fairness, = mention > > his agile feet as well. But is this how we measure an organist? I = hope > not. > >I hope SO ... and it should also be mentioned that he could (and did) = play a >KILLER church service.     You and I will just have to disagree here, then. I do not measure any musician by his/her technical prowess, nor, necessarily for any lack thereof. Call me old-fashioned. As regards a "killer" service, I'm not = sure what that term means in the context of a church service. Forgive me. I heard Mr. Fox many times at the Riverside Church on Morningside Heights in =   NYC and don't recall anything except excessive registrations.     > > 3. And who sets the standards as to tempi and registrations? Well, I > > suppose we all do -- collectively. > >Nope. I do what works for ME, in MY building, on MY organ, given my = technical >prowess, or lack of it.     How nice for your listeners. Having not heard your playing I couldn't possibly comment. Most of us -- not all -- acknowledge certain standards and conventions in performance. I, for example, would never play Bach's "Allein Gott..." (BWV 662) on full organ. Nor would I employ any string or =   celeste stops with any Bach piece --- but, there is nothing to prevent you =   from so doing; with a very few exceptions Bach indicated no registrations so go ahead, do what works for you, as you say.       > > And there is certainly a consensus, an > > agreement, about these elements that still allows a rather large = degree of > > freedom for interpretation. But there are clearly boundaries that one > > crosses at the risk of being considered uninformed at best or lacking = taste > > at worst. > >Oh, BALDERDASH! > >Standards change ... one only has to look at recital programs from = previous >generations, and contemporary accounts of HOW they were played, as well.     Well, you're correct. But it was (and is) difficult to play Bach (for example) properly on a typical 19th century tubular pneumatic "romantically" equipped and voiced organ. Your statement implies that we may well see the standards change back to those of the 19th and early = 20th century in a cyclical manner. What fun! Do you see us ever breaking out of =   this cycle?     > > I don't wish to detract from Virgil's reputation; he worked hard to = develop > > it. I only wish us to recognize him for what he was -- a superb = showman, a > > so-so musician. > > > > Dave Pitzer > > > >Ah, the intolerance of youth.     Thank you; I'll take it! Dave     >Cheers, > >Bud (who was inspired to major in organ by that Fox recital in the '50s) > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: more Fox >From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 15:52:32 EDT > >Greeting everyone, > > I'd like to say that I think Virgil Fox was one of the = greatest >organist of the 20th century, and for anyone to say that he was a so-so >musician, is not to know the meaning of a musician. Sure, he put on a show >with his flashy lights (in the latter part of his very successful = career), >but so what! I was born in 1970, and I'd give my right arm to have been = able >to see this amazing person play the organ the way he did. All I have are = his >records, tapes, and thanks to modern technology, his CD's. I do though, >think that the Virgil Fox society is charging a little too much for his >videos. But the only reason they're charging as much as they are is = because >there aren't very many videos of him in existence, and if his fans want = to >see him, we HAVE to go to them, and they know this. Eventually, the = prices >will go down. Who knows, maybe one day in the future, some rick guy like = ted >Turner will buy the rights and put them of the shelves in Video >stores...........we can only hope. I wonder if The Joy Of Music videos = will >quadruple in price when Diane Bish passes away........? > >Carlo > >______________________________________________________ >Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 13:23:22 -0700 > >Now that we have a deacon assisting, I probably WON'T have time to sing >a complete Psalm at communion-time every Sunday. > >Most of my communion motets are Latin from my days in the RC church; in >the old days when I DID play in Episcopal churches, they tended to sing >hymns, rather than motets and anthems. > >My congregation won't hold still for a steady diet of Latin at communion >... would appreciate suggestions/copies of fairly easy, quiet >English-language communion anthems. > >Cheers, > >Bud > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: more Fox >From: "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 14:52:00 PDT > >May we please let Virgil, Marilyn, and Elvis rest in peace?!! Yes, let's >thank them for their contributions to society and then move on. > > >______________________________________________________ >Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 18:34:47 -0400 > >If it has to be quiet, this won't work; but if you can forsake quiet, = Gustav >Holst's setting of Let all mortal flesh is my absolute favorite. > >If you must have quiet, use any number of other settings thereof. And = call >it an ordinary instead of a proper. Then there's anything of Divinum >mysterium, of course. > >Alan, the cheater > > >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> > > > > My congregation won't hold still for a steady diet of Latin at = communion > > ... would appreciate suggestions/copies of fairly easy, quiet > > English-language communion anthems. > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 18:45:02 EDT > >Hey Bud, > >How about Vaughan Williams' "O Taste and See"? > >John > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 15:49:23 -0700 > >Naw, Alan, I scandalize 'em when I do "Lutheran communion" and build up = to >full >"organ" when the Communion Hymn calls for it. Andy and I both used to = play >plenum partitas between verses of the communion chorales at Pilgrim, and = the >congregation would just wail away with big grins on their faces. Not so = the >"Jesus And Me" high Anglicans at communion-time. Very pious, VERY quiet. > >Alan Freed wrote: > > > If it has to be quiet, this won't work; but if you can forsake quiet, > Gustav > > Holst's setting of Let all mortal flesh is my absolute favorite. > > > > If you must have quiet, use any number of other settings thereof. And = call > > it an ordinary instead of a proper. > >I wasn't speaking of that ... the Communion Verse will continue to be = sung to >Gregorian Chant as soon as the choir comes back from receiving the = Sacrament. >BUT, our custom WAS to add a complete PSALM to the Communion Verse, = either >repeating the Verse after each pair of Psalm-verses, or at the end after >"Gloria >Patri". Now, with a Deacon, there's not enough time for THAT, but MORE >time than >the Communion Verse covers, unless it happens to be ungodly long, so what =   >I need >is English-language Communion anthems and motets of 4-6 pages in length. > > > Then there's anything of Divinum > > mysterium, of course. > > > > Alan, the cheater > >The 1940 Hymnal is absolutely POVERTY-STRICKEN when it comes to good >eucharistic >hymns, and the Latin Rite only contributes a few that aren't in the 1940: =   >Verbum >supernum, Sacris Solemniis, Ubi caritas, etc. ... we have all those in >translation in manuscript. From there they descend to "O Lord, I Am Not >Worthy", >"Jesus My Lord, My God, My All", and/or "I Am The Bread of Life", = depending on >whether you're talking conservative or liberal. > >I have to get ahold of some Lutheran books. I remember liking to = improvise on >"We Come, O Saviour, To Thy Table" (is that the right title?) out of the = LCMS >book. > >The English Hymnal is a bit better, but those have to be written out as = well >because of the English choirbook format: words here, tune there. > >Cheers, > >Bud > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 15:50:02 -0700 > >Got it; do it; need more like it. > >Cheers, > >Bud > >DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: > > > Hey Bud, > > > > How about Vaughan Williams' "O Taste and See"? > > > > John > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 17:58:07 -0500 > >Bud/Burgie wrote: > > > My congregation won't hold still for a steady diet of Latin at = communion > > ... would appreciate suggestions/copies of fairly easy, quiet > > English-language communion anthems. > >Walford Davies, "God be in my Head", comes immediately to mind, as do too >many of the items in the Oxford Easy Anthem book to remember, (and I do = not >have my copy readily available at the moment). Hope publishing has >published items under the auspices of, or at least with strong support = for >the goals of the Hymn Society of America, the current one of which is >supplement 99, which is listed on their website at 11.99 per copy. I >haven't seen this volume, but was highly impressed with former offerings = in >the same vein, Hymnal Supplements I and II. > >One of the best sources I have used in the past for this kind of a = function, >is some other churches hymnal, there are a variety of new tunes, new = texts, >and new tune/text combinations which tend to promote, IMHO, meditation. >Doesn't have to be a new hymnal, either; I have copied items out of the >Methodist Sunday School Hymnal (London, UK, 1916), and out of "The >Revivalist, 2nd Edition (Troy, NY, 187?), and the Hymnal (H.W. Gray, = 1916: >predecessor to the Hymal 1940) for such uses. > >Finally, if your choir is comfortable with Anglican Chant, there is = always >the opportunity to do other prayers (and, of course, Bud, you don't have >anything better to do than do some pointing, right?) set to simple = chants; >haven't tried this yet, but I would think it would be highly effective. > >Hope this helps > > > > > > > > > > Cheers, > > > > Bud > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: communion anthems in English (X-posted) >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 16:04:34 -0700 > > > >Noel Stoutenburg wrote: > > > Bud/Burgie wrote: > > > > > My congregation won't hold still for a steady diet of Latin at = communion > > > ... would appreciate suggestions/copies of fairly easy, quiet > > > English-language communion anthems. > > > > Walford Davies, "God be in my Head", comes immediately to mind, as do = too > > many of the items in the Oxford Easy Anthem book to remember, (and I = do not > > have my copy readily available at the moment). Hope publishing has > > published items under the auspices of, or at least with strong support = for > > the goals of the Hymn Society of America, the current one of which is > > supplement 99, which is listed on their website at 11.99 per copy. I > > haven't seen this volume, but was highly impressed with former = offerings in > > the same vein, Hymnal Supplements I and II. > > > > One of the best sources I have used in the past for this kind of a > function, > > is some other churches hymnal, there are a variety of new tunes, new = texts, > > and new tune/text combinations which tend to promote, IMHO, = meditation. > > Doesn't have to be a new hymnal, either; I have copied items out of = the > > Methodist Sunday School Hymnal (London, UK, 1916), and out of "The > > Revivalist, 2nd Edition (Troy, NY, 187?), and the Hymnal (H.W. Gray, = 1916: > > predecessor to the Hymal 1940) for such uses. > > > > Finally, if your choir is comfortable with Anglican Chant, there is = always > > the opportunity to do other prayers (and, of course, Bud, you don't = have > > anything better to do than do some pointing, right?) set to simple = chants; > > haven't tried this yet, but I would think it would be highly = effective. > >It is; that's what we do now, not only Psalms, but other passages of = Scripture >... I particularly like chanting the eucharistic discourses from St. = John's >Gospel on occasion. But we need something shorter ... it seems a shame to = hack >up Psalms or Scripture ... we'd been accustomed to chanting great chunks >lasting >10-20 minutes depending on the number of communicants (our Communion goes = VERY >slowly, even with a Deacon to give the chalice). BTW, if you'd like some >of our >settings, I'd be happy to send them to you .. we have BUCKETS, and I just >finished filing them AGAIN, so I can get to them. > > > > > > > Hope this helps > > > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- >End of PipeChat Digest > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: things tubular, gnarly, killer and otherwise From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 21:47:09 -0700       dave wrote:   > > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > > >Subject: Re: more Fox > >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> > >Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 11:20:36 -0700 > > > > > >I remember Fox making an impassioned appeal to save the large = four-manual E.M. > >Skinner in First Congregational Church in St. Petersburg, FL, following = a > >recital > >there in the late '50s. Unfortunately, it was replaced by a large = @#$%^&*, and > >the pipe organ later burned in storage. He was a champion of the best = of > >Skinner > >work, and had a large personal collection of Skinner ranks, some of = which > >went to > >the Silica Basilica organ, which he designed, but didn't live to play.   > > > You speak as though E. M. Skinner organs are to be revered and = cherished.   Well, I dunno ... an awful lot of folks are awfully sorry they ripped = theirs out at the height of the neo-baroque craze ... at least one well-known church in = Boston spend a FORTUNE acquiring ANOTHER one twenty years later. Of course, for a = church with THAT much money, the solution IS two organs ... a baroque tracker in = the gallery and a Skinner in the chancel.   But to answer your question: yes, E.M. Skinner organs should be cherished = and preserved for what they are: among the best of the romantic/orchestral = period of American organ-building.   > > As far as the Silica Basilica organ is concerned ...I'm not familiar = with > it, I've never heard of it, actually so I can't comment.   You ain't missed much (grin) ... the acoustics are WEIRD; the = Ruffati/Skinner is BORING.   > > > > > 2. As far as his technical prowess, his being able to "play the = fingers off > > > of any other organist"...probably true. And we should, in fairness, = mention > > > his agile feet as well. But is this how we measure an organist? I = hope > > not. > > > >I hope SO ... and it should also be mentioned that he could (and did) = play a > >KILLER church service. > > You and I will just have to disagree here, then. I do not measure any > musician by his/her technical prowess, nor, necessarily for any lack > thereof. Call me old-fashioned.   If you mean that a musician should be measured by his musicality (vide = Dupre's recordings of Bach in his later years) and not by the number of right or = wrong notes he plays (within reason), I of course agree; but the ability to put = the right fingers and feet on the right notes at the right time in the right tempo = SURELY has to figure in there SOMEWHERE.   > As regards a "killer" service, I'm not sure > what that term means in the context of a church service.   Surfer talk ... I live in the surfing capital of the West Coast ... = synonyms: gnarly, tubular ... standard English: excellent/exciting   > Forgive me. I > heard Mr. Fox many times at the Riverside Church on Morningside Heights = in > NYC and don't recall anything except excessive registrations. > > > > 3. And who sets the standards as to tempi and registrations? Well, I > > > suppose we all do -- collectively. > > > >Nope. I do what works for ME, in MY building, on MY organ, given my = technical > >prowess, or lack of it. > > How nice for your listeners. Having not heard your playing I couldn't > possibly comment.   I'm puzzled ... do you NOT take into account the building, the organ, the = action, the voicing, the speech of the pipes, etc. etc. etc. when you play? Or for = that matter, whether or not you've had one too many Long Island Ice Teas the = night before (grin)?   As to technical prowess, well, even Widor simplified the hard parts of his Symphonies as he got older. I haven't reached THAT point, and I WILL play = the large Vater unser from the Clavieruebung before I die, but after two strokes and = four operations in three years, I don't regularly program big Bach Preludes and = Fugues anymore either ... my right foot just won't GO about the top "C" of the pedal-board. But I can still play and direct a KILLER Anglican High Mass = (grin).   > Most of us -- not all -- acknowledge certain standards > and conventions in performance. I, for example, would never play Bach's > "Allein Gott..." (BWV 662) on full organ. Nor would I employ any string = or > celeste stops with any Bach piece --- but, there is nothing to prevent = you > from so doing; with a very few exceptions Bach indicated no = registrations > so go ahead, do what works for you, as you say.   As someone pointed out not too long ago on one of these lists, Silbermann, = rather than Schnitger is emerging as the "ideal Bach organ" du jour. Among the = things noted was the absence of the Rueckpositiv, the PRESENCE of string stops = (!), and the preponderance of 8' stops. No, I'm sorry, it wasn't on these lists; it = was the lead article in the latest "Tracker". And no less a luminary than Dirk = Flentrop included a labial Voce umana 8' stop on more than one of his organs; = granted, that's a bow to the south, but there it is ... I would certainly use it = for some of the quieter manualiter chorale preludes, for instance. I also play the = small Kyrie on the 4' flute with tremulant.   > > > > > And there is certainly a consensus, an > > > agreement, about these elements that still allows a rather large = degree of > > > freedom for interpretation. But there are clearly boundaries that = one > > > crosses at the risk of being considered uninformed at best or = lacking taste > > > at worst. > > > >Oh, BALDERDASH! > > > >Standards change ... one only has to look at recital programs from = previous > >generations, and contemporary accounts of HOW they were played, as = well. > > Well, you're correct. But it was (and is) difficult to play Bach (for > example) properly on a typical 19th century tubular pneumatic > "romantically" equipped and voiced organ.   I have played Bach Preludes and Fugues on a 19th century tubular pneumatic = action organ of seven stops quite handily. They might LOOK romantic, but they = were still on slider chests and relatively low wind pressure. Tubular pneumatic = action has taken a bad rap (Mander just restored a large 4-manual t/p organ in = England) because most builders either don't know how to work on it, or don't care = to. Most 19th century TRACKERS (and this was the point of the article in "The = Tracker") play Bach quite authentically, if one accepts current research (and the use of = the Great to Pedal coupler).   > Your statement implies that we > may well see the standards change back to those of the 19th and early = 20th > century in a cyclical manner. What fun! Do you see us ever breaking out = of > this cycle?   Naw ... ain't it FUN?! (grin). I'm waiting for a Victorian English = Romantic organ to be built for St. Matthew's ... God willing, I'll live to see it.   > > > > > I don't wish to detract from Virgil's reputation; he worked hard to = develop > > > it. I only wish us to recognize him for what he was -- a superb = showman, a > > > so-so musician. > > > > > > Dave Pitzer > > > > > > >Ah, the intolerance of youth. > > Thank you; I'll take it! > Dave > > >Cheers, > > > >Bud (who was inspired to major in organ by that Fox recital in the = '50s)   Dave, you remind me of nothing some much as myself as a freshman at = Oberlin, circa 1962 ... fire-breathing authenticist, determined to consign to perdition = every electric action organ I came into contact with.   That spirit lives, by the way ... having emasculated the E.M. Skinner in = Finney Chapel with an inept rebuild in the late '50s (which, by the way, marked = the beginning of the end of G. Donald Harrison's ascendancy in the American = organ world), they're now ripping it out in favor of a new Fisk tracker, which, admittedly, will be wondrous; but so was the old Skinner, from all = reports.   I'm only sorry I won't be around in fifty years or so to see how you've = mellowed, and/or where the pendelum will stand THEN.   Cheers,   Bud