PipeChat Digest #1183 - Monday, December 6, 1999
 
Re: Tracker action with electronic registration...
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Top 10 Lists
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
Re: Top 10 Lists
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: Top 10 Lists (long)
  by "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Top 10 Lists
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Top 10 Lists
  by "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Tracker action with electronic registration... From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 1999 21:31:51 EST   In a message dated 12/4/99 12:03:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk writes:   << At St John's college, Cambridge the organ is completely tracker, even = the stop knobs. For some reason they have to be pulled out very [far] to work, =   and the pistons don't always work either. >>   I am not sure what is going on here - we have had no reports of = difficulties. St. John's has what is often called Dual Registration. The stop action is completely mechanical, hence very long-draw stop controls. There are, however, very powerful solenoids that move the stop knobs and sliders for = the combination system. This same system is installed in our rather smaller = organ at Pittsford, New York (Rochester), where there was feeling amongst the = organ department students that the action, both stop and key, should be = completely mechanical. The church's musicians also wanted an instrument that would conveniently accompany a wide range of choral repertoire, some of it requiring rapid changes. Hence, the dual (rather costly) system there. It does take a bit of getting used to, as time has to be allowed for the long =   stops and sliders to move, which means pushing the piston a bit in advance = of what you might do with a completely electric stop action, and holding it = in firmly to set all that activity in motion. I spent a lot of time playing = the Pittsford organ during the final stages of its tonal finishing, and I = found that I really liked the system a great deal.   You can find both the Pittsford and St. John's Cambridge instruments fully =   described and pictured on our website.   Anyone within driving distance of New Haven is urged to come to Woolsey = Hall at Yale for Ken Cowan's Artist Diploma recital tomorrow (Monday) at 8 p.m.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Top 10 Lists From: <Prestant16@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 1999 23:53:59 EST   What about the top 10 innnovation with the pipe organ? Or the 10 most infuental oragnbuilders? Here are my picks, in order of importance:   1. Electric organ blower 2. Electro-pnumatic action 3. Using plywood chest tables 4. All electric action 5. Solid state technology 6. Haskell Pipes 7. Skinner Regulators 8. Zinc pipes 9. Adjustable combination action 10. Supply companies! and coming in at.................. 9,993,456,332: PERFLEX (right before MIDI)     Organbuilders:   1. E. M. Skinner 2. G. Donald Harisson 3. Charles B. Fisk 4. Hope-Jones 5. Henry Willis 6. Elias and George G. Hook 7. Walter Holtkamp 8. Frank Hastings 9. (Modern builders) Hans-Erik and Peter Laukhuff 10. ?   Here are some picks for the most influental and important insturments:   1. Walker organ at Methuen Memorial Music Hall, Methuen, MA 2. Cavialle-Coll at Notre Dame 3. Fisk at Wellsley College, MA. The first modern tracker built in that = style. 4. ? 5. ? 6. Aeolian-Skinner opus 940 at Church of the Advent, Boston, MA. (an early =   "American Classic") The original A-S instrurment that was at the Germanic Musiem in Cambrige, = MA 7. ? 8. ? 9. Wanamaker 10. Midmer Losh in Atlantic City (the big one!)     When you think about it, what has really improved? Not much, we just have =   different ways of building organs.   -William C.    
(back) Subject: Re: Top 10 Lists From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 06 Dec 1999 00:16:08 -0500   At 11:53 PM 12/5/1999 -0500, William C. wrote: >What about the top 10 innnovation with the pipe organ? Or the 10 most >infuental oragnbuilders? Here are my picks, in order of importance: > I don't know if there are 10 of them, but here are my picks for technological improvements in the life of organists:   1. Copiers with zoom features. 2. Post-It notes 3. Electronic metronomes 4. Sheet music software   I haven't used the latter yet (am waiting to get a job so I can get it at the church price), but I see the results in easy-to-read scores produced = by my own music director and his world-wide network of friends.     Evie   mailto:efrowe@mindspring.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Top 10 Lists (long) From: "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 1999 21:31:52 -0800   I'm in a mood to play devil's advocate (evil grin) ...   Prestant16@aol.com wrote:   > What about the top 10 innnovation with the pipe organ? Or the 10 most > infuental oragnbuilders? Here are my picks, in order of importance: > > 1. Electric organ blower   destroyed the natural flexibility of manually-raised wind ... I restored = the feeders on a 19th century organ so we could do a side-by-side comparison = with the turbine blower ... it's hard to put it into words, but the wind was more = "alive" when it was raised by hand ... retaining the big single-rise reservoir = helped some .... I could live with an electric blower attached to a flexible wind = system, for practical reasons ... Brombaugh provided both in the seminary chapel organ = at Oberlin ... blower for practice, hand-pump for performances.   > > 2. Electro-pnumatic action   made possible all SORTS of abuses, including scattering the organ about = the church, up in the attic, down in the basement, etc. etc. etc., not to = mention that you're at the mercy of the pull-downs or the pitman action and have NO = control over the speech of the pipes, other than "on" and "off".   > > 3. Using plywood chest tables   EEEKKK!!!   > > 4. All electric action   for what, the doorbell? Have you ever PLAYED an early Wicks? (grin)   > > 5. Solid state technology   Maybe ... the jury's still out on that one ... I wonder how many = solid-state combination actions are Y2K-compliant ... I KNOW my Hammond/Suzuki isn't = (thank the Powers that Be for LARGE favours!)   > > 6. Haskell Pipes   Definitely!   > > 7. Skinner Regulators   OK   > > 8. Zinc pipes   naaaa...   > > 9. Adjustable combination action   hmmm ... I regularly played a large three-manual organ WITHOUT one in a = large Anglo-Catholic church with a TERMINALLY complicated service ... again, = most of the music we play was WRITTEN for organs with very few (or no) registrational = aids. A small to medium-size church organ can do just fine with a couple of = adjustable mechanical "machine stops" and/or ventils.   > > 10. Supply companies!   Depends ... SOME organ-supply stuff is best burnt ... the European = pipe-makers, on the other hand, are decent.   > > and coming in at.................. > 9,993,456,332: PERFLEX (right before MIDI)   Yep ... got THAT right.   > > > Organbuilders: > > 1. E. M. Skinner > 2. G. Donald Harrison > 3. Charles B. Fisk > 4. Hope-Jones > 5. Henry Willis > 6. Elias and George G. Hook > 7. Walter Holtkamp > 8. Frank Hastings > 9. (Modern builders) Hans-Erik and Peter Laukhuff > 10. ?   No argument there, except maybe Hope-Jones (but without him we wouldn't = have had the Mighty Wurlitzer, which IS an instrument with a repertoire)   I'd add the best of Kilgen, Kimball, Welte, and the big Aeolians like the = front organ at Duke University ... and there are some FINE Mitchell Austins from = the teens ... Koehnken & Grimm, Matthias Schwab, and the rest of the regional = 19th century builders, etc. ... and don't forget Tannenberg in the 18th (? I'm = tired and it's late).   Actually, when you talk about modern tracker builders, you really need to = do the whole family tree that descends from John Brombaugh, and all the builders = and organists that were "converted" by the Harvard Flentrop and the big = Beckerath in Trinity Lutheran in Cleveland.   > Here are some picks for the most influental and important insturments: > > 1. Walcker organ at Methuen Memorial Music Hall, Methuen, MA   But it didn't REALLY have any LASTING effect on the direction of American organ-building ... it's sort of an isolated phenomenon, like the = Steinmeyer in Altoona, Pennsylvania.   > 2. Cavaille-Coll at Notre Dame   ??? Don't know about that ... I'd say Roosevelt's importing of C-C REEDS = had more effect.   > 3. Fisk at Wellsley College, MA. The first modern tracker built in that = style.   'K   > > 4. ? > 5. ? > 6. Aeolian-Skinner opus 940 at Church of the Advent, Boston, MA. (an = early > "American Classic")   There are LOTS of THOSE to choose from ... St. Mary the Virgin as Harrison left it, Trinity, New Haven, Epiphany, DC, etc.   > > The original A-S instrument that was at the Germanic Museum in Cambrige, = MA   Yep ... and Walter Holtkamp's rueckpositiv that he added to the Skinner in Cleveland Art Museum   > > 7. ? > 8. ? > 9. Wanamaker > 10. Midmer Losh in Atlantic City (the big one!)   Other than the fact that they EXIST, how much did they really influence = American organ-building?   > When you think about it, what has really improved? Not much, we just = have > different ways of building organs. > > -William C. >   I've lived long enough to see the pendelum swing from E.M. Skinner to = werkprinzip trackers and back again ... and that's healthy ... I wanna hear the new Schoenstein in St. Paul's, K Street, DC (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Top 10 Lists From: "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1999 00:53:23 -0500 (EST)   innovations: 1) a place to put kleenex 2) electrically adjustable benches (fun during a boring sermon) 3) setter button 4) multiple memories 5) general cancel button   to add to the top 10 organs: -Moller at West Point -Mander/Skinner at Princeton Univ Chapel -Schantz at Newark Sacred Heart -Schantz at First United Meth-Toms River, NJ -(Ok, it's not a large installation, but it is the best organ in the county, by all accounts). Felix Hell likes it, that's good enough for me. Of course, I'm not biased at all on this one. 8-) -Johnson (?) at St. Stanislaw (?) in Buffalo, what an incredible sound. -Taylor/Boody at Holy Cross College, Worcester. my humble opinions   Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Top 10 Lists From: "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 1999 22:18:13 -0800       N Brown wrote:   > innovations: > 1) a place to put kleenex > 2) electrically adjustable benches (fun during a boring sermon) > 3) setter button > 4) multiple memories > 5) general cancel button   closed-circuit TV so you can see what's going on in the Sanctuary and the Narthex ... I'm gonna NEED it in the new building.   a rest-room in the choir loft ... really had to FIGHT for that one (grin) .... hope it's sound-proofed!   > to add to the top 10 organs: > -Moller at West Point   I've never heard it ... is it REALLY that good? I thought it was made up = of pipes from all over ...   > -Mander/Skinner at Princeton Univ Chapel > -Schantz at Newark Sacred Heart   Yeah, but a KAZOO would sound good in THAT building!   > -Schantz at First United Meth-Toms River, NJ -(Ok, it's not a large > installation, but it is the best organ in the county, by all accounts). > Felix Hell likes it, that's good enough for me. Of course, I'm not > biased at all on this one. 8-) > -Johnson (?) at St. Stanislaw (?) in Buffalo, what an incredible sound.   Just about ANY Johnson ... has anyone heard the one in St. Mary's, New Haven CT (transplanted from St. Alphonsus, NYC)?   Bud   > > -Taylor/Boody at Holy Cross College, Worcester. > my humble opinions > > Neil > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org