PipeChat Digest #1185 - Wednesday, December 8, 1999
 
New Haven Hook
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
"Early American" organ case
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: New Haven Hook
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Top 10 Lists--Appleton?
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
American Builders in Paris?
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
RE: influential instruments
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
The Golden Ear
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: Tracker action with electronic registration...
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Dual Action Organs.
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: influential instruments
  by "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net>
Re: influential instruments
  by "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: influential instruments
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: American Builders in Paris?
  by "Greg Corbett" <corbettg@theatreorgans.com>
Re: American Builders in Paris?
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: New Haven Hook From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 1999 07:48:52 -0500   Dear List:   Bonnie Beth Derby is right: The organ at St. Mary's in New Haven is the 1871 E. & G. G. Hook 3m moved from St. Alphonsus in NYC. It does not have Barker lever action, but straight tracker action to the keys and pneumatic slider motors. The current key action replaces electric action to EP pull-down units that had been installed ca. 1922. The original action was tracker, perhaps with a Barker lever on the Great, but the evidence of the Barker lever is questionable. Other organs of similar size had them.   Perhaps the Johnson is the one with Barker lever at St. Mary's, Waterbury, Connecticut, also a 3m. It is a beautiful organ, but quite different when compared to the brilliant and powerful Hook at St. Mary's, New Haven.   Both organs are documented on CD. You know where to search for them.   Bill Van Pelt Organ Historical Society    
(back) Subject: "Early American" organ case From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 1999 07:53:09 -0500   Regarding the Boston Music Hall organ now at Methuen, the case was designed and built in the U. S. by the Herter Brothers Furniture Co. in New York City. The innards were built by E. F. Walcker in Germany. Both the case and the works had significant influence on other builders, including a former apprentice with the Boston builder, Wm. B. D. Simmons, who apparently got most of the parts for the original Mormon Tabernacle organ from his Boston master. The case appears to have been built locally, as were the famous 32' facade pipes.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: New Haven Hook From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1999 08:11:38 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: William T. Van Pelt III <wvanpelt@erols.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 1999 7:48 AM Subject: New Haven Hook   > Bonnie Beth Derby is right: The organ at St. Mary's in New Haven is the > 1871 E. & G. G. Hook 3m moved from St. Alphonsus in NYC. It does not   OOOOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHHHHHHH! I remember now!   > Perhaps the Johnson is the one with Barker lever at St. Mary's, > Waterbury, Connecticut, also a 3m.   I am getting my Connecticut cities mixed up. In any case, I have played = that particular Hook. In fact, I had lessons on it with Ron Ebrecht during the New Haven POE in '97 (I think). That building is to die for.   Thanks Bonnie Beth.   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Re: Top 10 Lists--Appleton? From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1999 08:16:18 -0500     > I'd have to argue with the above. So far I think the greatest organ in the > US is at Immac. Conception Boston, MA, 1864 Hook.   Ah, Glen Goda used to play there. (Not the pianist, the organist.) The Mission Church.   IMHO, I still enjoy the A-S's at Church of the Advent, Boston, and St. = Mary the Virgin in NYC. And we can't forget Girard in Phili!   > -Johnson (?) at St. Stanislaw (?) in Buffalo, what an incredible sound. > -Taylor/Boody at Holy Cross College, Worcester. >>   For that matter, what about Holy Cross Cathedral in Worcester, MA? Is that = a Hook? I remember hand pumping while someone played a Bach P&F. It was like being on a stairmaster.   And what about that Appleton in Connecticut somewhere...?   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: American Builders in Paris? From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1999 08:21:47 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0031_01BF408C.1AA3BA40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   With all these top ten lists, it got me wondering: Did any of the =3D American builders and voicers every do anything significant out of the country? (I.E. =3D Hook, Harrison, the classics we all know and love.) My curiosity is piqued because I'm =3D wondering what=3D20 names I may run into in Canada--besides Casavant.=3D20   Anybody?=3D20   -Rebekah   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0031_01BF408C.1AA3BA40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#d8d8d8> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>With all these top ten lists, it got me wondering: = =3D Did any of=3D20 the American builders</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>and voicers every do anything significant out of the = =3D country?=3D20 (I.E. Hook, Harrison, the</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>classics we all know and love.) My curiosity is =3D piqued because=3D20 I'm wondering what </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>names I may run into in Canada--besides = Casavant.=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Anybody? </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>-Rebekah</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0031_01BF408C.1AA3BA40--    
(back) Subject: RE: influential instruments From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1999 08:12:52 -0600   Bud:   You're right. The original Tabernacle instrument was built on site from huge trees hauled by teams of draft animals from the Wasatch forests. I wrote a paper about the history of organ building in America when a senior in college, and the Tabrnacle organ was one of my subjects.   Peter    
(back) Subject: The Golden Ear From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 1999 09:20:25 -0500   Dear List:   There is now an award for the best organ record of the year. We have Michael Alan Fox to thank for causing it to happen. As a organ aficianado, music lover, audiophile and professional writer, Michael reviews CDs and writes columns for the most popular audio magazine in the U. S., "The Absolute Sound." Since 1996, he has contributed to the magazine's annual "best of the year" citations with organ CDs. It is a great benefit for the organ in general, brining to a wider culture the passion that we list members have for the instrument.   This year, "The Absolute Sound" has begun calling these best of the year CDs "The Golden Ear Awards." The recipients are announced in the brand-new, December 1999/January 2000 issue and are two CDs recorded in the U. S. on American organs:   1) Ethereal Recordings ER-103 "Paris on Park Avenue" featuring the Guilbault-Th=E9rien organ in the chapel at Brick Presbyterian Church, New York City, played by Brick's organist, Keith Toth. Composers include Franck, Alain, Boellmann, Piern=E9, Vierne, Dupr=E9, and Lef=E9bure-Wely. = Fox says of this CD, ". . . the 26-rank organ is voiced to sing rather than shout. . . both organist and engineer clearly reveled in the sounds of the instrument's stops . . . Toth plays assuredly and with obvious affection for both the organ and the music . . . This is a rare example of an organ record more liely to persuade by eloquence rather than impress by terror . . ."   2) World Library Publications WLP-2914 "The Sacred Legacy of Paris: Music of 205h Century Titular Organists" featuring the Lively-Fulcher organ in St. Patrick's Church, Washington, D. C. as played by five organist-members of the Liturgical Organists Consortium, a group dedicated to the music of the Roman Catholic Church. They are Mary Beth Bennett, Robert Gallagher, James W. Kosnik, Alison J. Luedecke, and Lynn Trapp. They play works by all of the composers you would expect: Widor, Dupr=E9, Vierne, Cocereau, Franck, Piern=E9, Tournemire, Langlais, = Guilmant, Messiaen, and Durufl=E9. Writes Fox of this CD "The performances are faithful and convincing; the recording is so good that it would be an injustice to call it sensational."   Of course, both of these CDs are available from the Organ Historical Society http://www.ohscatalog.org   A CD I produced for my little label, Raven, "The Planets" by Gustav Holst, transcribed and played by Peter Sykes (with the help of Mrs. Sykes, Victoria Wagner) at Girard College, was previously named by "The Absolute Sound" as Organ Record of the Year. Thus, as a "laureate" of this award, I congratulate all involved in these two fine CDs, especially producers Justin Bischof of Ethereal and Jay Rader of World Library Publications. Most of all, I congratulate engineer Edward Kelly, who recorded all three CDs!   Bill Van Pelt    
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker action with electronic registration... From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1999 21:50:38 -0000   >I am not sure what is going on here - we have had no reports of difficulties. >St. John's has what is often called Dual Registration. The stop action is >completely mechanical, hence very long-draw stop controls. There are, >however, very powerful solenoids that move the stop knobs and sliders for the >combination system. This same system is installed in our rather smaller organ >at Pittsford, New York (Rochester), where there was feeling amongst the organ >department students that the action, both stop and key, should be completely >mechanical. The church's musicians also wanted an instrument that would >conveniently accompany a wide range of choral repertoire, some of it >requiring rapid changes. Hence, the dual (rather costly) system there. It >does take a bit of getting used to, as time has to be allowed for the = long >stops and sliders to move, which means pushing the piston a bit in = advance of >what you might do with a completely electric stop action, and holding it = in >firmly to set all that activity in motion. I spent a lot of time playing the >Pittsford organ during the final stages of its tonal finishing, and I = found >that I really liked the system a great deal.     I am used to pressing the pistons early, but perhaps it is the holding = down that I was not used to - I can only remember pressing the tutti = composition pedal and only about 5 stops popping out! (But I loved the jingly cymblestern!!!)   Richard.    
(back) Subject: Dual Action Organs. From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1999 21:53:29 -0000   Dear List,   A short while ago we discussed organs with tracker and electronic = consoles. I had a peak in the back of our organ the other day (the great and pedal = of which can be played remotely even though the entire instrument is tracker (apart from the stop knobs!!)) and the great and pedal trackers all run along one wall. When the key is depressed, they move downward, and I = noticed that above them all there is a solenoid with a little metal bar pointing downwards. When a note is pressed from the remote console, the solenoids pushes the tracker down instead of the person. It gives no control over = the speech, but who needs that for hymn playing?   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: influential instruments From: "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 1999 17:59:46 -0600     --------------46B2B77DE619C1CDD81AF3FD Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   According to my source, the very first organ in use by the Mormons was = built in Australia by Joseph Harris Ridges who had emigrated from England to prospect for gold and later converted to Mormonism. (See The Mormon = Tabernacle Choir, by Charles Jeffrey Calman and William I. Kauffman, Harper & Row, = 1979, chapter 4). The church fathers in Utah heard of the instrument and = demanded it be brought to America. Ridges family and organ arrived in San Pedro CA in 1856. They wintered in Los Angeles, but the organ was shipped ahead to San Bernadino. It was shipped to Salt Lake in the spring of 1857. It was = played for the first time Oct. 11, 1857, for a regular Choir rehearsal in the old adobe Tabernacle. It had to be moved again within a year in order to = protect it from the US Army, but was soon returned. When the Old Tabernacle was replaced by the new Assembly Hall, the organ was installed there. The = authors say that some of the original pipe work is present in the organ we hear = today.   This is an interesting book and well worth reading if you can find a copy. = I found mine on a bargain table somewhere. The price tag says $1.99 and has = a fancy W logo on it. Could it be Woolworth's. There hasn't been one of = those around these-here parts in at least 20 years. Anyway, the book was a real bargain. Maynard   Storandt, Peter wrote:   > Bud: > > You're right. The original Tabernacle instrument was built on site from > huge trees hauled by teams of draft animals from the Wasatch forests. I > wrote a paper about the history of organ building in America when a = senior > in college, and the Tabrnacle organ was one of my subjects. > > Peter > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       --------------46B2B77DE619C1CDD81AF3FD Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML> According to my source, the very first organ in use by the Mormons was built in Australia by Joseph Harris Ridges who had emigrated from England to prospect for gold and later converted to Mormonism. (See <I>The Mormon Tabernacle Choir</I>, by Charles Jeffrey Calman and William I. Kauffman, Harper &amp; Row, 1979, chapter 4). The church fathers in Utah heard of the instrument and demanded it be brought to America. Ridges family and organ arrived in San Pedro CA in 1856. They wintered in Los Angeles, but the organ was shipped ahead to San Bernadino. It was shipped to Salt Lake in the spring of 1857. It was played for the first time Oct. 11, 1857, for a regular Choir rehearsal in the old adobe Tabernacle. It had to be moved again within a year in order to protect it from the US Army, but was soon returned. When the Old Tabernacle was replaced by the new = Assembly Hall, the organ was installed there. The authors say that some of the = original pipe work is present in the organ we hear today.   <P>This is an interesting book and well worth reading if you can find a copy. I found mine on a bargain table somewhere. The price tag says $1.99 and has a fancy W logo on it. Could it be Woolworth's. There hasn't been one of those around these-here parts in at least 20 years. Anyway, the book was a real bargain. <BR>Maynard   <P>Storandt, Peter wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE>Bud:   <P>You're right.&nbsp; The original Tabernacle instrument was built on site from <BR>huge trees hauled by teams of draft animals from the Wasatch = forests.&nbsp; I <BR>wrote a paper about the history of organ building in America when a senior <BR>in college, and the Tabrnacle organ was one of my subjects.   <P>Peter   <P>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" <BR>PipeChat:&nbsp; A&nbsp; discussion List for pipe/digital organs &amp; related topics <BR>HOMEPAGE : <A HREF=3D"http://www.pipechat.org">http://www.pipechat.org</A> <BR>List: <A = HREF=3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org</A> <BR>Administration:&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"mailto:admin@pipechat.org">mailto:admin@pipechat.org</A> <BR>Subscribe/Unsubscribe:&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"mailto:requests@pipechat.org">mailto:requests@pipechat.org</A></BLO= CKQUOTE> &nbsp;</HTML>   --------------46B2B77DE619C1CDD81AF3FD--    
(back) Subject: Re: influential instruments From: "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 1999 16:18:53 -0800   Some interesting contradictions here ... I DO remember the name "Joseph Ridges" being attached to the earliest organ in the Tabernacle ... but I DON'T remember anything about it coming from Australia. Maybe Peter can shed some more light on this.   Cheers,   Bud   Maynard Cuppy wrote:   > According to my source, the very first organ in use by the Mormons > was built in Australia by Joseph Harris Ridges who had emigrated from > England to prospect for gold and later converted to Mormonism. (See > The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, by Charles Jeffrey Calman and William I. > Kauffman, Harper & Row, 1979, chapter 4). The church fathers in Utah > heard of the instrument and demanded it be brought to America. Ridges > family and organ arrived in San Pedro CA in 1856. They wintered in Los > Angeles, but the organ was shipped ahead to San Bernadino. It was > shipped to Salt Lake in the spring of 1857. It was played for the > first time Oct. 11, 1857, for a regular Choir rehearsal in the old > adobe Tabernacle. It had to be moved again within a year in order to > protect it from the US Army, but was soon returned. When the Old > Tabernacle was replaced by the new Assembly Hall, the organ was > installed there. The authors say that some of the original pipe work > is present in the organ we hear today. > > This is an interesting book and well worth reading if you can find a > copy. I found mine on a bargain table somewhere. The price tag says > $1.99 and has a fancy W logo on it. Could it be Woolworth's. There > hasn't been one of those around these-here parts in at least 20 years. > Anyway, the book was a real bargain. > Maynard > > Storandt, Peter wrote: > >> Bud: >> >> You're right. The original Tabernacle instrument was built on site >> from >> huge trees hauled by teams of draft animals from the Wasatch >> forests. I >> wrote a paper about the history of organ building in America when a >> senior >> in college, and the Tabrnacle organ was one of my subjects. >> >> Peter >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >> topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: influential instruments From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1999 22:44:16 EST   Bud,,,and listers-- Barbara Owen in her book "The Mormon Tabernacle Organ- an American = Classic" states that in May of 1856, the Ridges family accompanied by some Mormon elders and the dismantled organ (soldered up in watertight metal cases), sailed for San Pedro, California, = on the schooner JENNY LIND. Owen states that it was nearly a year before the organ made its trek over the mountains from San Bernadino to Salt = Lake,,,and it was installed and played (all 7 stops of it) on October 11, 1857. The organ was originally built in Sydney. When the Ridges family had lived in England, they lived very near to the Willis, Harrison, and Hill organ factories and that young Joseph Ridges = MAY have been a Hill apprentice at one time. Hope this helps, Kind regards, ---Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: American Builders in Paris? From: "Greg Corbett" <corbettg@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 1999 19:13:20 -0800   Rebekah, was wondering what organs she may wander into in Canada. I think the fastest way to show Canadian Organ manufacturers is to point to this site:   http://www.orgalt.com/media.html   I think it would be fair to say that Canadian organ installations would also represent the major manufacturers of the world. Eastern Canada would probably have more actual pipe organ installations than western Canada (inhabited later, hence more electronic installations).   I think it is fair to say, my curiousity is also piqued, to what installations are out there. I watched a Keates pipe organ installation in my home church back in 1969 (modest 2m/?ranks).    
(back) Subject: Re: American Builders in Paris? From: <Prestant16@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 1999 00:13:36 EST   In a message dated 12/7/99 8:27:10 AM Eastern Standard Time, = rringram@syr.edu writes:   << With all these top ten lists, it got me wondering: Did any of the = American builders and voicers every do anything significant out of the country? (I.E. Hook, =   Harrison, the classics we all know and love.) My curiosity is piqued because I'm = wondering what names I may run into in Canada--besides Casavant. >>     A good book about that kind of thing is "The American Classic Organ, A =   History in Letters" Really interesting discussions betweeen Skinner, Willis, Harrison, just to mention a few.