PipeChat Digest #1187 - Friday, December 10, 1999
 
Re: New Organ Photos--cross posted
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
And Can it Be!
  by "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au>
New year's Choral/Organ music
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: New Organ Photos--cross posted From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 09 Dec 1999 15:42:07 -0500   > From: SchultzRH@aol.com > > I hope that list readers near the Philadelphia area will be able to = attend > the dedication on March 5, 2000. David Higgs will be playing two = identical > recitals.   Ralph: WHAT CAN ONE SAY???   It looks absolutely marvelous!   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan    
(back) Subject: And Can it Be! From: "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999 10:02:22 +1100   I think this is the list that has had the inquiries about the hymn "And can it be" recently. I just received this email from France this morning which I thought was rather appropriate!     Date : jeudi 9 d=E9cembre 1999 19:20 Objet : Prisoners in Organs     PRISON PIPE ORGANS   I can imagine that there were young boys who rebelled at being forced to attend church, sit quietly, listen to the organ, and behave in a prayerful manner under the watchful eye of the priest.   I can also imagine that the adult behavior of some of those miscreants brought them to be incarcerated in Pentonville prison in London where they were again forced to sit quietly, listen to the organ, and behave in a prayerful manner under the eyes of the guards and the menacing organists.   Yes, this is a picture of the most captive audience ever to be force to listen to organ music. Pentonville prison was built in London, England in the 1840', and its plan was server. At the rear-center can be seen the supreme instrument of torture - a tracker-action pipe organ. Torquemada could have learned much from the authorities at Pentonville.   The auditorium was arranged so that each convict was brought in with a hood over his head, moved into position in an individually-isolated small booth (choir stall?), and only after seated was the hood removed. No prisoner was ever able to see any other prisoner! Pentonville was designed to preserve the solitary confinement of each prisoner, even within a group. The divided seating, left & right, would facilitate the embarrassing singing of sounds, even canons with two conductors; worse than summer camp or contemporary worship.   Imagine the agony of a convict music lover forced to listen to inappropriat= e registrations, bungled pedal technique and tasteless music selections from the hapless organist. It would be the ultimate inhuman punishment - prison and church all rolled into one.   The organ was probably built by Gray & Davison, which installed other priso= n instruments. Recently, women have been jailed at Pentonville, and organ servicemen are accompanied by guards to protect them from desperate female inmates. One woman prisoner chased a serviceman around the auditorium until she caught him by the organ.   The title of "Prison Organist", or more probably "Prisoner Organist" is rare, though the Letter-to-Editor columns in recent organ magazines relate horror stories of a similar nature in current employment conditions. At least there was job security in some situations in the old days.   The main use of the organ is to support singing of the divine service on Sundays, A favorite hymn is "And can it be that I should gain" sung to the Sagina. A best-loved verse (with Tutti on, Swell box open and Solo Tuba) is= :   Long my imprisoned spirit lay Fast bound in sin and nature's night; Thine eye diffused a quickening ray: I woke, the dungeon flamed with light. My chains fell off, my heart was free: I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.        
(back) Subject: New year's Choral/Organ music From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999 02:32:23 EST   Does anyone know of any good choral pieces with organ accompaniment that = are appropriate and suitable for a big New Year's Day/Millenneum Liturgy? I = am thinking of things SEPARATE from the Christmas and/or Epiphany themes that =   run at that time of year.   Thanks-   Scott Foppiano