PipeChat Digest #694 - Sunday, February 7, 1999
 
Practice time needed...
  by "mreeves@vzinet.com" <mreeves@vzinet.com>
children and organs
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Children at the console -  playing to distraction
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
DISASTERS!!!
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinel@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Blowers
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: Fw: Distractions:  Kids and Organs
  by <CymbaleIII@aol.com>
Re: Fw: Re:playing to distraction
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
Re: Questions about practice...
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
RE: Questions about practice...
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Re: Suffer the little children
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
New Web Site
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Kiddie Organs
  by "greg mcausland" <greg@gaybrighton.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Kiddie Organs
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Fw: Re:playing to distraction
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Questions about practice...
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
How organists begin
  by <Pepehomer@aol.com>
Kids and organs
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Questions about practice...
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
RE: Questions about practice...
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Good advice about practice...
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Re: Kids and organs
  by "straight" <straight@infoblvd.net>
Re: Kids and organs
  by "MR SAND   LAWN" <KWQT65A@prodigy.com>
Children/organs
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Re: Children/organs
  by "bmjohns" <bmjohns@swbell.net>
 


(back) Subject: Practice time needed... From: mreeves@vzinet.com (mreeves@vzinet.com) Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 05:29:06 -0600   <cross posted>   I will be in the Kingsville and Corpus Christi areas of Texas, March 8th through the 11th, on business. Are there any list members in those areas that are willing to allow me an hour or two of organ practice? I am scheduled to present an organ program the following Sunday, the 14th and don't want to go too long without running through my program. Will be willing to pay "building use" fee, if necessary. TIA   Respectfully +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Mark Reeves, Director of Music, Organist First United Methodist Church Canton, Texas +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Redman Organ (Op. 10, 1975 - 2/21) - - http://www.angelfire.com/tx/FUMCMusicOrgan/organ1.html FUMC-Canton Homepage - - http://netministries.org/see/churches/ch02328 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++    
(back) Subject: children and organs From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 07:54:18 -0500   To borrow a quote from another lister, +ACI- nor am I an ogre +ACI-. I get a little sensative when someone- anyone- approaches the console of an instrument. I ask them if they know how to play, and if they do ( even tho somewhat ), then fine. I am usually within ear and eye-shot to monitor them. To allow a child to touch anything while you are playing a postlude ( or any piece during the service ) is just poor taste and lack of management on the organist's part. Yes, ' suffer the little children ', but not during Mass, or services. When I went to Parochial school, I already had a few years of lessons under my belt. The sister who taught math was also the organist. She was kind enough to slip me the key to the loft where I could practice during lunch time on their 3m Moeller. I don't EVEN want to get into the nun who taught English +ACE- +ACE- When I was 9 y o, we went to the Ice Capades at the ( old ) Chicago Stadium. During a lull in activities dad took me up to see Al Melgard-- the kind man who played the monster Barton beast. Al let me sit on the bench and took my picture, saying, +ACI- don't touch anything +ACI-. Could you imagine the clamour of noise a little kid could make on such an instrument in a packed indoor stadium? OMG. The point being, yes, again, suffer the little children by instilling respect for the instrument and proper use thereof.   Thank you, Rick      
(back) Subject: Children at the console - playing to distraction From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 08:10:12 EST   IMHO the list is reminded of the Open Console Night concept recently suggested:   Perhaps a Find the Console game after each (or the last) service of the day would help curious youth seek out this deeply hidden console. Younger children like such games, e.g. 1. go up the loft stairs; 2. turn left; 3. take six giant steps; etc. perhaps a short invitation to the console in the church bulletin would foster interest; "if you would like to watch the organist play..."   Organists, if you love your instrument enough to dedicate your life to playing it, certainly you con find ways to share that love with at least one young person each month!   Stan Krider   Jeff White recently wrote:   <snip> How can I spark the interest of people to bring kids up? Evidently, most of   you must be where it is easy for a child to approach, ie, in front of the   church. I'm in the loft in the back, so, maybe this is the reason for the   "lack" of interest?   <snip>    
(back) Subject: DISASTERS!!! From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinel@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 14:11:24 -0000   Hi all,   I had a major disaster yesterday, here goes...........   Yesterday was a concert at a local church with a nice big 4 manual organ of my school (Northampton School for Boys) and jointly with Northampton School for Girls. The music at these schools (most of which is joint) is widely renown in the surrounding area, so we all had a reputation to live up to. Anyway, back to the organ. I was down for accompanying the choir, and then for playing an organ solo ("Alleluyas" by Simon Preston). I had my lesson at the church in the morning with my teacher, and then at the full rehearsal in the afternoon, the organ broke! A dreadful cipher on the swell - AAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!   For about an hour I was frantically calling people I know who may have been able to fix it. Luckily a friend who is an organ builder/tuner, he is not a "fly-by-nighter" so I will name him: Michael Latham cam and fixed it. He later said that disasters were nothing to him as he once fixed the organ at the Royal Albert Hall, during on of the BBC Proms!!!   Bye,   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Blowers From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 09:11:56 EST   John,   Grab that 2HP spencer blower as fast as you can. This is a bargain even if it needs some reworking.   Later, Phil L.  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Distractions: Kids and Organs From: CymbaleIII@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 10:24:44 EST   I believe this is more a case of "kids with manners" (i.e. look but don't touch until invited) versus "kids without" (impromptu duet).   Of course when a youngster shows interest that is the ideal time to give an introduction and hands on -- and hopefully the parents have taught their kids the proper way to behave so your not pulling out the trompette, turning pages, and fending off kinderspeilen....all at the same time!!! --Robin  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Re:playing to distraction From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 07 Feb 1999 09:59:44 PST   >I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with the following. Little kids DO NOT belong anywhere near the console unless the roll-top is down and they are under watch. > >R. Veague     I'm sorry Rick, but I have to disagree with you. If it weren't for the generosity of the organist at my home church and at another church in the area allowing me to watch them play their postludes and even play a few notes after the postlude, I might not have had the determination to take lessons. It was this interaction at an early age that made me love the organ as much as I do.   Chris Mullen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions about practice... From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 07 Feb 1999 10:19:11 PST   >If you play for Services on a weekly, or regular basis, what do you do to prepare when you have many other activities (jobs, responsibilities, etc.) during the week? Do you have rigid practice times? If so, how long and how often? How far ahead do you plan your literature for a Sunday Service? Do you spend much time on technical studies?   My organ teacher in college has said that if you want to become a better organist, you should practice 2 hours a day (and I admit, I'm guilty of not following this order) and to maintain your current ability, to practice an hour a day. As far as getting sick of playing, I've never really had that problem. I'm in college right now learning how to be a music director, so I've not had the experience of playing in a really large church and playing multiple services a week. Hope this will help you out a little.   Chris Mullen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Questions about practice... From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 13:56:32 -0500   Chris:   I strongly feel that your liturgical year music should be planned out by September. This includes a year of Preludes, Postludes, Hymns, Anthems, etc. Practice and rehearsal schedules should be planned with an eye on time needed, etc.   Let's face it, you need to prepare nearly 100 compositions and perform them at performance level. I strongly feel that before a composition can be performed it should be memorized at least two months in advance. This includes hymns and choir accompaniments.   For an experienced player, some of the compositions will require minimal practice while others will require weeks of preparation. This will also require planning well in advance.   I don't mean to make this sound like a service should be a concert. However, we must maintain concert standards to bring the worship with music to the highest possible levels.     Charles E. Brown http://www.classicalcorner.com   >    
(back) Subject: Re: Suffer the little children From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 12:56:02 -0600   > I found a Priest and inquired whether I could play the organ >for a few minutes. "Oh, no," I was informed at once, "that is quite >impossible, we were told not to let anybody play it."   A reading from the method according to Johnson, beginning at chapter one, page 7...   "...It should be pointed out that normal, proper practice does an organ no harm, whether it be large or small. Indeed, the organ, being essentially a mechanical instrument, suffers most from inactivity. It is best for the average church organ to be used at least one hour a day. Adequate usage keeps the leathers limber and small parts free of dust. Given a good, heavy-duty blower, an organ can be played eight or more hours per day without harm. By the same token, loud playing does not damage the instrument or cause excessive wear."   * Johnson, David N. "Instruction Book for Beginning Organists, Revised edition" Augsburg, 1973.   As an aside, the organ here at KU has no problem with this. It was designed with a heavy-duty motor that can run 24 hours a day all year long. Time on the instrument is booked up from 6am until midnight, and students keep the bench constantly warm. Just like it should be, right?      
(back) Subject: New Web Site From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 14:02:02 -0500   Everbody:   Please take a look at my new web site listed below and use it if you can. I will welcome all suggestions. Also, if you want the free newsletter, please join the mailing list on the site.   Charles E. Brown http://www.classicalcorner.com   >    
(back) Subject: Kiddie Organs From: "greg mcausland" <greg@gaybrighton.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 21:21:08 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_0008_01BE52DF.C7185D80 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Why doesn't a toaster manufacturer (electronic pipe emulator instrument = maker) design a kiddie sized organ for children to start learning to = play in the comfort of their own home. If Casio and Yamaha can make = cheapo electronics - surely someone could come up with a simple, = indestructable, colourful design with lots of wonderul theatre organ = traps and noises to keep the little sweet ones amused for hours. Add = playback, floppy disk, learning aids and you have a new generation of = organists waiting to fill in the shoes of organist-less church posts.   I come across so many children who want to learn to play Bach's Toccata = in D minor. Give them the equipment and they will be bitten by the bug. = So at least when they come to pull out the stop marked 'Double Farty = Shaker 32ft' they might do it in the right place.=20   ------=_NextPart_000_0008_01BE52DF.C7185D80 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 = http-equiv=3DContent-Type> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Why doesn't a toaster manufacturer = (electronic=20 pipe emulator instrument maker) design a kiddie sized organ for children = to=20 start learning to play in the comfort of their own home.&nbsp; If Casio = and=20 Yamaha can make cheapo electronics - surely someone could come up with a = simple,=20 indestructable, colourful design with lots of wonderul theatre organ = traps and=20 noises to keep the little sweet ones amused for hours.&nbsp; Add = playback,=20 floppy disk, learning aids and you have a new generation of organists = waiting to=20 fill in the shoes of organist-less church posts.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>I come across so many children who = want to learn=20 to play Bach's Toccata in D minor.&nbsp; Give them the equipment and = they will=20 be bitten by the bug.&nbsp; So at least when they come to pull out the = stop=20 marked 'Double Farty Shaker 32ft' they might do it in the right=20 place.</FONT><FONT color=3D#000000 = size=3D2>&nbsp;</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_0008_01BE52DF.C7185D80--    
(back) Subject: Re: Kiddie Organs From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 17:27:27 EST   In a message dated 2/7/99 3:24:07 PM Central Standard Time, greg@gaybrighton.freeserve.co.uk writes:   << So at least when they come to pull out the stop marked 'Double Farty Shaker 32ft' they might do it in the right place. >>   I've not heard of this stop... but it sounds like it stinks! :-)   Cheers and God save the Queen!  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Re:playing to distraction From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 17:46:17 EST     In a message dated 2.7.99 12:39:48 AM, vdbarton@erols.com writes:   <<Nurturing the next generation of organists absolutely requires   that we of this generation do this sort of thing.>>   Thank you David. There's no way to know (or even to estimate wildly) the influence of those few minutes. It's not just this kid. It's the kids HE may hoist onto a bench 40 years down the road. And . . . . .   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Questions about practice... From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 17:57:20 EST   Dear Mark,   I will share my practice habits with you...   Q1) If you play for Services on a weekly, or regular basis, what do you do to prepare when you have many other activities (jobs, responsibilities, etc.) during the week? A1) Set aside certain times when I will do none other than practice, period. Q2a&b) Do you have rigid practice times? If so, how long and how often? A2a) See above. A2b) Usually about two hours at a time and generally about 3 times a week, <Wed., Thu., Sat.>. However, practice time is increased when learning new music or preparing for Festivals - ie. Xmas and Easter. Q3) How far ahead do you plan your literature for a Sunday Service? A3) Regarding organ literature - usually two weeks, but sometimes as much as a month before the major Festivals. Regarding choral literature - usually three months. Q4) Do you spend much time on technical studies? A4) Not near enough! Q5) On the other hand, what do you do to combat rehearsal monotony after you've been "playing" for other rehearsals for hours at a time? A5) Have a drink... or two at the local watering hole! Q6) Does anyone just get tired of "playing"? A6) I usually don't, but then I don't practice as much as I should sometimes! Q7) How do you cope? A7) See A5   I hope this helps!   John A. Gambill Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church (ECLA) Dallas, Texas http://members.tripod.com/~organist_johng/index.html  
(back) Subject: How organists begin From: Pepehomer@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 17:58:20 EST   Here's another message to add to this thread of letting children next to the organ. I was just wondering, how did most of us start our "careers" as organists? For me, it was the fact that my father was a pastor at a rural Lutheran Church in Kansas, with a "huge" (what I considered it then, anyway - picture of it at http://members.theglobe.com/crazyllamas/llama_page_3.html) Reuter pipe organ. For some reason this always captivated my interest, and I would beg my father to open it up and let me "toy" with it... I even went to the point that I tried NOT to take piano lessons, I just wanted to play the organ! I soon began to teach myself, and began just doing hymns, etc. just on manuals. In about 9th grade I started to teach myself pedals... and now I'm a decently "accomplished" organist (better than some, yet there's still a lot of lit. that I can't even dream of doing yet) - never took lessons until I went to college, and they drove me CRAZY just because I was used to doing things my way - why any other way? =) My interests, however, would have never started if I was never allowed to see the console, or to watch another organist make this "piano" looking instrument work a bunch of tubes in the middle of the balcony! Justin Karch Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS Rome, GA  
(back) Subject: Kids and organs From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 18:42:39 -0500   I seem to have started a fire here unintentionally, and I apologise for that. My comments were from a purely SERVICE and DAMAGE point of view. Yes, by all means, encourage the youngsters to get excited about the organ, but please, under supervision. If a young person is fortunate to have the church organist as their teacher, and no one objects, give a few lessons on the instrument. Whet their appetite, and let them get used to real pipes. I know I got the bug when I heard the Barton at the Chicago Stadium-- and it was a pretty big bug, too. Again, my apologies....   Rick Veague.            
(back) Subject: Re: Questions about practice... From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 18:56:07 EST   In a message dated 2/7/99 2:57:42 AM Eastern Standard Time, mreeves@vzinet.com writes:   << If you play for Services on a weekly, or regular basis, what do you do to prepare when you have many other activities (jobs, responsibilities, etc.) during the week? Do you have rigid practice times? If so, how long and how often? How far ahead do you plan your literature for a Sunday Service? Do you spend much time on technical studies? >>   I'm organist at Center Moriches United Methodist, on Long Island, NY. Our choir rehearsal is on Wednesday from 7:30 - 9 pm. I usually practice hymns, prelude and postlude for a couple hours after rehearsal. Hymns just need a few run-throughs, so most of the time spent is on preludes and postludes..... and yes, some drills.   This gives me two benefits: I know what the hymns and Scripture readings are for Sunday, so I can base my selections on that. AND, most importantly, if something needs a little extra work, I can fit in some time on Saturday for additional practice.   I do plan ahead - I already have my Palm Sunday and Easter preludes and postludes picked out and practiced, and several good ones ready at all times. I was a sub orgnist for many local churches for a long time, so I'm in the habit of staying a few weeks ahead of what I need.   I also sight-read very well,and sometimes I admit I'm tempted to skip out and not practice - but the angst involved in sight-reading in public is just not worth it. Anyway, I'd rather practice than sleep!   This practice schedule is on the organ.... I have a piano home, so I can practice the keyboard work whenever I have a few spare moments. I also have another job (office manager in an interior design office) and a family, and I try to stick to a regular exercise program.   Vicki Ceruti  
(back) Subject: RE: Questions about practice... From: "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 19:13:28 -0500   Vicki:   You made a very important statement. You said that you keep a regular practice exercise program. This is important!!!! As artist, we need to keep a somewhat disciplined life and practice regiment.   Charles E. Brown http://www.classicalcorner.com      
(back) Subject: Good advice about practice... From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 20:05:19 EST   I think the best advice I ever got from a professor (or at least when I finally took it!) was twofold:   Try to practice regularly. 30 minutes or an hour of disciplined practice each day is much more productive than 4 hours crammed in on Saturday. And - Practice under tempo a lot. This allows to brain to really take in all the information on the page rather than just your fingers doing the work with no brain help. It works. Of course you have to get to the performance tempo, as well!   I ALWAYS end my serious practice sessions with either an improvisation, or to play a favorite piece of a favorite hymn. And I leave the console on an up *note!*   Those of you students out there who are following this thread. PLEASE take advantage of this precious time. Listen to your Prof's. They do know something! Relish each moment of every class and all the luxury being a student offers. When I look back on how much college time I wasted I am very sad! Work in the real world has its joys and pleasures, but nothing will ever match up to the chances we have as full time students!   Randy  
(back) Subject: Re: Kids and organs From: straight <straight@infoblvd.net> Date: Sun, 07 Feb 1999 20:55:39 -0500   How Fascinating! Have you noticed? Seems like every one has had the same experience in some way - we were attracted! Or to put it in more formal and direct terms - we each have been "called"! We had better keep a sharp eye out for that young person who is hanging around looking - and wishing - maybe quietly, maybe being a pest. Not only is that one being called, you are being called to reach out and make the connection. This list is just the place to share and work up a batch of ideas to involve young people and help them develop an interest in the organ, and how to educate the adults as to what their children are and are not allowed to do. Maybe started out as an annoyance and damage discussion, but let's turn it into something positive and useful. A lot of these kids are not learning good manners and behaviour anyplace else, as I'm sure you have noticed. How about a nice concise phrase to put in the church bulletin, or program, or newsletter? How about some more ideas? I liked the "find the organ" game. Have you seen the "music" "REX"? Do you know of anything else already in print with ideas? AOG had an Organist Assistant suggestion, but it's pretty limited. These kids are learning on little keyboards and digital pianos, and the touch technique carries over very easily, for a start. They love rock bands with lots of volume and vibration - we sure can offer them that, and better material too. But it has to be fun. Diane Straight   -- (straight@infoblvd.net)  
(back) Subject: Re: Kids and organs From: KWQT65A@prodigy.com (MR SAND LAWN) Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 21:40:59, -0500   I have my first "prodigy" piano student ... 6 years old and has studied for three months now. He has better hand coordination than many of my 12 year old students and can read almost anything I put in front of him. Last week when we were working on a hymn, he turned to me and said, "This would be better on the organ." As I teach in the sanctuary we went up to the organ, I hoisted him onto the bench where he played "Fairest Lord Jesus" perfectly. The look on his face made me know he is hooked for life, .... I hope. At the end of each lesson, I plan to allow him to play one hymn on the organ. Does anyone have any advice for these children who are so incredible?   My own experience was that of such frustration of wanting to play the organ but being held back by fear of others that I would damage my piano technique. I want to do the very best for this exceptional student.   Sand Lawn Northminster Church Monroe, LA  
(back) Subject: Children/organs From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 20:48:25 -0600   Several weeks ago (or perhaps longer), someone posted a note telling of having young children have a special time "at the organ." It mentioned having the organist play, allowing them to see a pipe chamber (if not threatening to the organ), and letting them touch some keys. I thought it was such a great idea that I printed it out and now seem to have lost the printout. If anyone could make suggestions concerning introducing young people to the organ, I would be very grateful.   Thank you,   Frank     Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Re: Children/organs From: bmjohns <bmjohns@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 07 Feb 1999 21:05:41 -0600     I seem to remember long ago one children's choir rehearsal was devoted to the organ. The organist turned the light on inside so we could see the pipes through the grille cloth. He brought out a couple of different pipes and blew them so we could see what made the sound. This was all accompanied by simple yet complete descriptions of how the organ worked. Then I believe we filed by the console to see it in action, and then one at a time were allowed to peek into the swell box. It was the first time many of the kids saw anything but the facade of the organ. It wasn't an introduction to playing, but at least an introduction to appreciation. Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://home.swbell.net/bmjohns/organ.htm organwebring@hotmail.com   Frank Johnson wrote:   > Several weeks ago (or perhaps longer), someone posted a note > telling of having young children have a special time "at the organ." It > mentioned having the organist play, allowing them to see a pipe chamber (if > not threatening to the organ), and letting them touch some keys. I thought > it was such a great idea that I printed it out and now seem to have lost > the printout. > If anyone could make suggestions concerning introducing young > people to the organ, I would be very grateful. > > Thank you, > > Frank > > Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) > Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader > http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ > 1922 E. 14th > Winfield, KS 67156 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org