PipeChat Digest #706 - Wednesday, February 17, 1999
 
Re: rankett/rackett/wurstfagott
  by <douglas@blackiris.com>
Re: rankett/rackett/wurstfagott
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
You say Rankett I say Rackett
  by "Richard F. Weber" <rweber@Aero.net>
Re: rankett/rackett/wurstfagott
  by "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@hantslife.co.uk>
Re: Allen C-3 Consoles
  by <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: rankett/rackett/wurstfagott From: douglas@blackiris.com Date: Tue, 16 Feb 1999 07:21:00 -0600   You definately brightened up my morning with that one - Ha Ha!   > "wurstfagott"   The original Renaissance instrument - Rackett - was also referred to as a Sausage Bassoon (literally Wurtsfagott) since it is a full 2 octave plus bassoon contained within about 6 - 7 inches of wood - it uses a U or really snake like bore - 9 parallel bores - and has extra figer holes covered by the palms and lower joints of the fingers. For more info see this delightful website.   http://www.contrabass.com/pages/rackett.html  
(back) Subject: Re: rankett/rackett/wurstfagott From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Tue, 16 Feb 1999 09:49:35 -0500   As a comment to the rackett thread:   I "played" one of these monstrosities when I was with the Queen's University Collegium Musicum. We all seemed to be expected to try our hands out on all sorts of weird and wonderful instruments - all of which were best used at a New Year's "Noise party".   As I recall, the rackett took a lot of "puff " to play! However, the worst one for needing a strong wind was the leather cornetto, - I never did manage that one! I think that during my time with the Collegium Musicum I learned to "play" seven instruments, including a portatif organ, which played well at rehearsals, but was a beast in concerts, for it always seemed to break down.   I don't think it would bother me much if I was never to hear a rackett again, let alone one on an organ stop! The Web page given below has a demo audio file on it, and it is very realistic!   Bob Conway ...   At 07:21 AM 2/16/99 -0600, you wrote: >You definately brightened up my morning with that one - Ha Ha! > >> "wurstfagott" > >The original Renaissance instrument - Rackett - was also referred to as a >Sausage Bassoon (literally Wurtsfagott) since it is a full 2 octave plus >bassoon contained within about 6 - 7 inches of wood - it uses a U or really >snake like bore - 9 parallel bores - and has extra figer holes covered by the >palms and lower joints of the fingers. For more info see this delightful >website. > >http://www.contrabass.com/pages/rackett.html    
(back) Subject: You say Rankett I say Rackett From: "Richard F. Weber" <rweber@Aero.net> Date: Mon, 15 Feb 1999 23:11:33 -0800   I believe it was Robert Donington, the musicologist who described the instrument as "resembling a disheveled drain pipe."   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: rankett/rackett/wurstfagott From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@hantslife.co.uk> Date: Tue, 16 Feb 1999 18:00:54 -0000     Dear All,   There is a superb recording on which, given a reasonably good hi fi set-up, you can sample the delights of the "Great Bass Rackett".   You can clearly hear this strange and unusual instrument 'buzzing' above (or below!!) an entire orchestra, choirs (several) and organs (2).   The recording is of the Praetorius Christmas Mass with the Gabrieli Consort and players conducted by Paul McCreesh recorded in the wonderful acoustic of Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark. I have to rate it as the finest recording of anything I have ever heard. You will also hear other interesting and varied sounds such as:   Therobos, Crumhorns, Cornetts, Sackbuts, Dulcians, Bass Violin, Tenor Violin, Regal, Shawms, Bass crumhorn and Bass Dulcian, Plus the magificent sound of the cathedral organ.   This has to rate as one of the finest and most electrifying recordings of all time.     Richard Scott-Copeland Southampton England      
(back) Subject: Re: Allen C-3 Consoles From: FireAlarmz@aol.com Date: Tue, 16 Feb 1999 19:07:12 EST   In a message dated 2/15/99 6:13:06 PM Pacific Standard Time, kevin1@alaweb.com writes:   << Can anyone provide me with a stoplist for the Allen C-3 console? I have been offered one free to attach the pipes to my Wicks. The enticement is to simplify adding pipes to my current 3 rank organ. Also, how are the stops arranged on the console? Are they knobs, rockers, or tabs? However, I am still reluctant to switch from my original 1936 Wicks console... >>   Hi Kevin. I'm an old (analog) A***n fan. If I'm not mistaken, the C-3 had three tone generators... tube... in large metal racks. The Swell and Great each had an 8' generator, and the Pedal had a 16' generator. There were a zillion couplers, including fractional pitches, to give upperwork from the 8' (or 16') stops.   The difference between it and a 3R unit organ is that those 8' (16' in the pedal) generators could give various tone qualities by means of filters... diapason, string, flute, reed. Of course, there was no chorus effect between stops, and to a certain extent they were changing color rather than additive. The other difference is that you could put the gyrophonic projectors (rotating speakers) all over a building and make a heck of a lot more sound than a 3R unit pipe organ.   The consoles were of the utmost quality and probably are, after 40 years, in good shape. The transistor organs came out in 1959 (amps were tube until 1964) and the models became TC-1, 3, 4, etc.   Hope this helps. Bill Miller, Central Baptist Church, Wayne PA