PipeChat Digest #707 - Wednesday, February 17, 1999
 
RE: French romantic registration (was "Langlais")
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais")
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais")
  by "Jim Swist" <jswist@quickturn.com>
Colin Howland in Concert, Dallas, TX
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais")
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: French romantic registration (was
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
misc. fer sale
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
organ book wanted
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais")
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: French romantic registration (was
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: organ book wanted
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Vatican II
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
Re: Vatican II
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Vatican II and all organized religions
  by "Dominic Joseph Radanovich" <rpob@aero.net>
 


(back) Subject: RE: French romantic registration (was "Langlais") From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 10:28:55 -0800   Hi, Vernon (and list),   In the process of answering Vernon's question about ventils, I decided it might be time to post the info to the lists again, since it's such a convoluted thing, and essential to the understanding of French romantic registration.   Ventils aren't couplers ... they're mechanical registration aids. All French romantic organs are laid out more-or-less the same, and the registrations reflect that.   Here's how it works: each division (Recit, Positif, Grand Orgue, Pedale) is divided into Jeux de Fonds and Jeux de Combinasion. The Jeux de Fonds are all the foundation stops (Diapasons, Flutes, Strings) of 32, 16 and 8 pitch, the flutes and mutations of 4 and above, the NON-chorus reeds (Hautbois, Voix Humaine, Cromorne, etc.) and sometimes the Cornets (depending on the organ).   The Jeux de Combinasion are the Principals of 4 and above, chorus Mixtures, (Cornets -- sometimes on smaller organs to substitute for a missing 4' Clairon in one or more divisions) and chorus reeds of whatever pitch.   The slider windchest for each division is divided in half from left to right; there are two pallets, one for each side of the divided windway, one for the Jeux de Fonds and one for the Jeux de Combinasion. In addition, there is a valve ("ventil") which shuts off the wind to the half of the chest which holds the Jeux de Combinasion. When the Barker lever pulls the tracker, it opens both pallets, but there's no wind in the Jeux de Combinasion side until the ventil is depressed, so no pipes on that side speak.   When a French organist sits down to play, he will draw whatever registration he wants among the stops of the Jeux de Fonds; THEN he will draw whatever he wants to add later from among the stops of the Jeux de Combinasion; THEN he will couple all three manuals together and begin to play.   The French romantic crescendo so difficult to accomplish on American organs (because the Positive manual is on the bottom ... the order of French manuals is: Grand Orgue - bottom; Positif - middle; Recit - top) is done like this:   The organist begins on the Recit with just the Jeux de Fonds. Then he passes to the Positif manual with the Recit coupled, still on just the Jeux de Fonds (which he can do easily because the Positif manual is directly under the Recit). Then he passes to the Grand Orgue, still on just the Jeux de Fonds, with both the Recit and Positif coupled. THEN he brings on the Jeux de Combinasion of the Recit (upperwork and chorus reeds) by depressing the ventil and allowing air to enter the Jeux de Combinasion half of the Recit windchest. Then he will successively depress the ventil for the Positif, Grand Orgue and finally the Pedale Jeux de Combinasion. Finally he will open the shutters of the Recit box. On French organs, this is an absolutely seamless crescendo from pp to FF.   Three other difficulties in translating French romantic registrations to American organs are (1) the lack of chorus reeds (Trumpet and Clarion) on American Positive organs (and some Great organs, notably G. Donald Harrison's Skinners), which leaves a big hole in the crescendo, (2) the lack of paired open and stopped flutes at 8 pitch ... again and again you will see the direction "Flute et Bourdon 8". The "Flute" is usually a harmonic or open flute; the "Bourdon" is practically always made as a chimney flute, either wood or metal (the sound of the two played together is a uniquely French timbre), and the lack of broad-scale string and dulciana (or similar) stops at 8 in all manuals.   The 8 string and dulciana allows for yet another seamless crescendo (accomplished by hand or with the aid of a stop-puller) WITHIN the 8 foundation stops of each division; beginning on the Dulciane (or similar stop) of the Recit, the organist nexts adds the Bourdon; next (and here's where the hole is) he adds the Violoncelle or Gambe, which forms a coloristic and dynamic bridge between the Bourdon and the louder Flute Harmonique; finally he adds the Montre. If he does this on the G.O. with all the manuals coupled, and draws the softest stop of each manual successively, followed by the next-loudest, and so forth, some very subtle dynamic variations are possible, and most French romantic composers call for them.   My point about the ventils affecting tempi is this: those ventil pedals have a LONG travel before they engage (at least in comparison with American pistons); in addition, it takes a little time for the wind to fill the chest. If you listen carefully, you will hear some pipes begin to speak off-speech before they're fully winded ... a characteristic (and a defect) of the ventil system. Most composers try and write around this by calling for the ventils to be depressed or retired (the opposite happens when you shut off the wind ... some pipes will not shut down immediately) at a rest, or when the Pedale is playing alone (several places in the Franck Grand Piece Symphonique).   Saint-Sulpice has a primitive adjustable combination action in addition to the above, but it was so expensive to build that I believe Cavaille-Coll never used it again, so it's not worth taking into account when discussing French romantic registration, since it's unique to Saint-Sulpice. In that particular case, there was some justification ... Saint-Sulpice IS the largest organ in France.   Recently there has been some discussion as to whether the full Jeux de Combinasion should include the mixtures, even though they are on the Jeux de Combinasion side of the chest, when the composer writes "Anches (reeds) Recit", "Anches Positif", "Anches G.O.", "Anches Pedale". The 17th century French CLASSIC Grand Jeu consisted of the full Cornets (8-4-2 2/3-2-1 3/5) and the chorus reeds, but NOT the mixtures. I don't think there's much merit to the argument on 19th century ROMANTIC organs, EXCEPT to remember that French romantic mixtures are low-pitched, and break back to SUB-unision pitches in the upper part of the keyboard to give more weight and gravity to the trebles. So it ISN'T appropriate to use a high-pitched germanic Scharff.   16' manual stops AND couplers are VERY important in French romantic music. When the composer writes at the top of the keyboard (like the Widor Toccata), he will call for not only manual 16' STOPS, but the 16' subcoupler as well, in effect making the 16' stops play at 32', but the practical result is a 16' sound, since the writing is in the top range of the keyboard. That's why you will occasionally find a manual 32' stop on a big French organ ... it's intended to be used instead of the 16' coupler.   Franck's registrations (at least for the pieces written for Saint-Clothilde) present some unique problems: the Saint-Clothilde organ as originally built had two notable deficiencies: the lack of sufficient 8' foundation sound in the Recit, and the lack of sufficient or varied 16' foundation sound in the Pedale. That's why Franck invariably calls for the Hautbois in addition to the Fonds on the Recit, and why he often calls for the 16-8 foundations of the G.O. to be coupled to the Pedale when the hands are on the Recit or Positif.   The debate is principally whether or not to draw the Hautbois on an organ that DOES have an 8' Montre in the Recit. The timbre of Flute-String-Hautbois is unique, but would Franck have used it if he'd had an 8' Montre?   Of course, none of the above takes into consideration the vast difference in SOUND between a Cavaille-Coll and an American organ of whatever vintage (grin). The best advice is probably to know the SOUND of the Cavaille-Coll intimately, and then try to approximate that on American organs, no matter WHAT stops and couplers you have to use to accomplish that. The French would say it all comes down to the good taste of the organist in any case (grin).   Cheers,   Bud            
(back) Subject: Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais") From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 13:55:08 EST   Hey Bud, Wow. Peace, Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais") From: Jim Swist <jswist@quickturn.com> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 14:09:40 -0500   Bud wrote an excellent summary of French romantic registration practices.   The only thing I would add is that you will note that this makes such instruments very "foot-centric", for lack of a better word, when it comes to registration changes on the fly. The ventils only operate with the feet, as does (obviously) the swell pedal. And as Bud stated, these ventils were not "teeny-tiny-tap" toe studs. It takes a lot of co-ordination to work all this gear in a piece with a busy pedal part. Some composers are nice to the performer in this regard (Franck). Other are not (Dupre). With regard to use of the hands, drawknobs tend to be large and heavy, and laid out in terraces with in many cases a longer reach to the outer knobs than on a console with jambs. There is at least some opinion that registrants were commonplace in this era...        
(back) Subject: Colin Howland in Concert, Dallas, TX From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 14:23:25 EST   On Monday, February 15, 1999, Colin Howland gave a concert at the Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas, on the magnificent 84 rank Lay Family Concert Organ (Fisk opus 100). He has talent and musicianship which I have never heard before (except for when I played last Sunday - JUST KIDDING). His technical abilities, excellent rhythm, and good stage presence are the mark of a GREAT organist! He has recently assumed the position of Assistant Director of Music and Organist at Park Cities Presbyterian Church, Dallas. Below you will find the varied and fun program:   Piece Heroique Cesar Franck Trio Sonata No. 6 in G Major: Vivace J.S. Bach "Bist Du Bei Mir" J.S. Bach Sinfonia to Cantata 29 J.S. Bach/Robert Hebble Wondrous Love Dale Wood Crucifixion from Passion Symphony Marcel Dupre Thou Art the Rock Henri Mulet Christ the Lord is Risen Today EASTER HYMN INTERMISSION Toccata on Old Hundredth Robert Hebble RHOSYMEDRE Ralph Vaughan Williams Improvisation on GOD REST YOU MERRY Myron Roberts O Come, All Ye Faithful ADESTE FIDELES Ballet Claude Debussy Medley from Phantom of the Opera Andrew Lloyd Webber Symphony No. 1 in D minor: Finale Louis Vierne   followed by an encore of: ""Stars and Stripes Forever" (President's Day you know)    
(back) Subject: Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais") From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 11:48:32 -0800       Jim Swist wrote:   > Bud wrote an excellent summary of French romantic registration > practices. > > The only thing I would add is that you will note that this makes such > instruments very "foot-centric", for lack of a better word, when it comes > to registration changes on the fly. The ventils only operate with the > feet, as does (obviously) the swell pedal. And as Bud stated, these > ventils were not "teeny-tiny-tap" toe studs. It takes a lot of > co-ordination to work all this gear in a piece with a busy pedal part. > Some composers are nice to the performer in this regard (Franck). Other > are not (Dupre). With regard to use of the hands, drawknobs tend to be > large and heavy, and laid out in terraces with in many cases a longer > reach to the outer knobs than on a console with jambs. There is at least > some opinion that registrants were commonplace in this era... >   Jim is right, and he made me think of some other things as well: French pedalboards are flat, straight and narrow (which makes Dupre's pedal exercises all the more interesting); the ventils are laid out in a straight line above them, so the ones at the extreme bass and treble ends of the pedals are harder to reach. The swell shoes, unless they have been moved, are mostly to the extreme right (not centered); if memory serves, they have "notches" to hold them in place at various points from opened to closed, so they aren't "balanced" like American ones. In at least some of the organs, the tremblants are only controlled by hitch-down foot pedals as well, as are ALL the couplers.   From contemporary descriptions, the vocation of stop-puller was raised to a high art in French organ-lofts. Students knew their masters' minds so well that they pulled and pushed with no additional directives needed. Larger organs required TWO registrants, one for each side of the console. And at Saint-Sulpice, the combination action is such that it can be reset while the organ is being played, so the registrants did THAT chore as well. Scary ...   Lest anyone rush out to order a Cavaille-Coll copy, it should be pointed out that these organs don't translate to acoustically-dead American churches any better than Schnitger copies, or anything else copies. French churches are HUGE by American standards, and almost invariably reverberant ... hence Dupre's rule about halving repeated notes. That also explains why a lot of Messiaen's music simply doesn't work in dead American churches and concert halls (aside from the sound of our organs) ... he wrote very skillfully for the expansive acoustics at La Trinite.   I haven't been to Paris since the very beginning of Vatican II ... it would be interesting (if not depressing) to see how much of the grand tradition of the Organ Mass has survived. The Durufles' church, at least, is said to have gone to guitars. There is a story (probably apocryphal, but one never knows) that the clergy very carefully explained to Messiaen how the changes in the liturgy would affect the Organ Mass at La Trinite; he nodded gravely, and then proceeded to go to the loft, lock the door, and improvise on the full organ for the whole of the noon Mass. I tend to doubt the story, since a fair amount has been written about the clergy at La Trinite being well-versed in Messiaen's vocabulary, to the point of preaching occasionally on some of his improvisations.   I'd be very interested to see anyone's notes on liturgical practice in Franck's day (or Tournemire's, for that matter). The alternatim practice is gone; the Organ Mass doesn't seem to have fully developed (at least in Franck's time), but there are some intriguing hints in L'Organiste that seem to indicate practices that I'm not familiar with (to what do the "Amen" snippets refer?). We know more of what Tournemire did at Mass, but the Postludes Libres for Vespers seem to indicate that he either preluded on the Magnificat antiphons, or (more likely) made interludes between the last verse of the Magnificat and the Gloria Patri (since Gloria Patri was not to be sung until the incensations at the Magnificat had been concluded).   Were Widor and Vierne's Symphonies strictly concert pieces for the Trocadero? Were there organ recitals in the churches? Or were movements of the Symphonies played at Mass? Inquiring Minds Want To Know ...   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: French romantic registration (was From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 13:14:29 PST   >I haven't been to Paris since the very beginning of Vatican II ...   I've seen this phrase Vatican II in several of the posts in the last few days. Could anyone clue me in on what this exactly means? I'm LCMS and have been all my life, and know very little about the Catholic church and Vatican City for that matter.   Chris Mullen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: misc. fer sale From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 16:45:26 -0500   Hi, again... I recently acquired some organ stuff:: free for the taking:::   One pr. Louisville Uniphone manuals, One pr. manuals w/ tracker weights, One pr. manuals (whatever they may be)   NAME YOUR PRICE FOR THESE---below::   One WurlitZer paneled console shell, w/ pedal board- no manuals, guts or bench. Was theatre, but Wurli sanctified console into str8 stop rail arrangement. Roll top.   One 3- manual Austin console w/ pedalboard. Beautiful.   These are in storage in Rushville, Indiana--about 50 miles southeast of Indianapolis. Thank you,   Rick Veague dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net      
(back) Subject: organ book wanted From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 16:50:13 -0500           Hello, Friends... I'm in search of an owner's manual for a WurliTzer electronic--model 4572-- console church organ. Anyone?? Send me the bill.   Thank you, all, Rick dutchorgan@svs.net      
(back) Subject: Re: French romantic registration (was "Langlais") From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 17:45:27 EST   Hi Bud,,,and list-- WOW is right! Thanks much Bud for that elucidation on the "french style of things" That was very informative, to say the least.   Cheers, --Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: French romantic registration (was From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 15:58:12 -0800   Chris -- oh, dear, how are things on Mars?   "Vatican II" was the Second Vatican Council, called by Good Pope John in 195? It was the first "Ecumenical" Council since Vatican I in 18??, which did lots of bad things, like declare the "Pope" "infallible", and that Mary's Assumption into heaven was a dogma on the level of belief in the Holy Trinity. Vatican II was no different.   An Ecumenical Council is a meeting of all the bishops of the world. This one (like all of them since 1000) was not "ecumenical" because it didn't include the Orthodox, the Anglicans, the Old Catholics, and certain orthodox Lutherans who kept the Apostolic Succession.   Vatican II turned the Roman Catholic church on its head ... it translated the Mass into English, turned the altars around, led to a mass exodus from seminaries, monasteries and convents, allowed guitars, did away with fasting .... and that was just the FIRST year (sigh). On the First Sunday of Advent 1964, telephone-book English reared its ugly head in the Holy Sacrifice for the first time.   By the time the dust settled, there were at least two schisms within the RC church; half of the Episcopal Church had left that denomination over a Prayer-Book that aped the liturgical "deformation" of Vatican II; your own Lutheran church had not one but TWO new hymnals/liturgy books, all reflecting the "thinking" of the "liturgists" of Vatican II.   Now, it's Ash Wednesday and I just got up from my nap and I'm cold and stiff and cranky, so take what I say with a grain of incense. Vatican II did lots of good things (most of which I've forgotten), but it also destroyed the few venerable good music programs in US RC churches. Latin was forbidden for a time; choral settings of the Mass are still discouraged, by custom if not by canon law. The few priests who are left are perceived as liturgical cheer-leaders (the average age of an RC priest in the US is in the middle fifties, and getting older every year). Unless the next "Pope" allows married priests (if not women priests), the RC church as we know it will disappear within a couple of generations.   I'm allowed to kvetch ... I was a Roman Catholic for a very long time before I went back to the high Anglican church where I belonged.   A not-so-cheery   BUD   Chris Mullen wrote:   > >I haven't been to Paris since the very beginning of Vatican II ... > > I've seen this phrase Vatican II in several of the posts in the last few > days. Could anyone clue me in on what this exactly means? I'm LCMS and > have been all my life, and know very little about the Catholic church > and Vatican City for that matter. > > Chris Mullen > > ______________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: organ book wanted From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 16:06:01 -0800   Rick - have you posted on the electronic list on Theatre Organ Classifieds? Also, there is a company (whose name I forget, but surely someone on the list will remember) that reprints all kinds of technical manuals. And there's always the Library of Congress, if you can find your way around their online catalog.   I think I might have played the model Wurlitzer you're asking about ... if it's a simple question, I might be able to answer it.   Cheers,   Bud   VEAGUE wrote:   > Hello, Friends... I'm in search of an owner's manual for a WurliTzer > electronic--model 4572-- console church organ. Anyone?? Send me the bill. > > Thank you, all, Rick dutchorgan@svs.net > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Vatican II From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 16:11:52 PST   Oh, I see!!! *grin* And I can understand why you're not so cheery!   Chris Mullen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Vatican II From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 19:36:14 EST   Dear Chris, Well having been raised in theRoman Church, sung in the choir, played the organ, knew all of the ordinary and most of the propers in latin and knew what they said as I had gone to a private high school, taken 4 years of latin, and two years of a "modern language" French, gloried in the magnificence of Palestrina, Montini, Mozart, and on and on, Vatican ll threw everything , the baby and the bathwater, out the window. In its place we were saddled with kumbaya and the other drivel and composers like Lucien Dies who, I assume , has a pact with the devil to force as many Rc's out of the church as he can. The Glory of Gabrielli, nor the Gregorian Chant of the Litany of the Saints, nor the Easter Vigil, nor the Christmas Vigil, nor anything which had to do with tradition, was kept. They then brought on the clowns and the lutes, guitars, sitars, war drums of the Sahara, and other distracting sounds to attract the devil himself to Divine worship. All for the sake of modernity. In turn, the Roman Church has been homogenized, pasteurized, made low fat, and packaged in chronological containers that you can purchase as you wish, no coupon required. And the God, which was the source of all that inspiration, the Divine Life of the Holy Mass, as with things removed from the perfect nourishment,milk, was also removed. I no longer attend any service. I find less distraction communing with my God at home or in a field, or next to a stream where I know, some crackpot cannot or wishes not, to disturb. I will bet that this will lead to an interesting thread. Peace, Paul  
(back) Subject: Vatican II and all organized religions From: "Dominic Joseph Radanovich" <rpob@aero.net> Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 19:12:09 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_0011_01BE5AA9.6A861EA0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   As a Roman Catholic, an organist and organ builder I have had my fill of = all the demands and politics of not only the Roman Church, but all of = them. I still occasionally go to mass or services, especially on the = big Holy days. I love the Easter season and wouldn't miss these events. = =20 =20 I now, sometimes, attend mass at The Church of the Great Spirit, = Catholic, in Milwaukee. This is the Native American Church here and the = liturgy incorporates Native music, dance, prayers and traditions. All = of these things plus my many trips to the South Dakota "Holy Places", = such as Bear Butte, Wounded Knee, or the Badlands for quiet = contemplation and the lifting of my spirit to the All Holy are my = religion now. =20 As much as I love the organ, it's music, good liturgy, Mozart, Widor, = Bach, Guillemont, I equally love the music of the wind and the circling = eagle. As much as I love the beauty of Gothic churches and stained = glass, I love the "church" of the wilderness in the Black Hills, or the = Bijou Hills. =20 =20 The Great Spirit is always there and always speaks to me. =20 Dominic Joseph Radanovich, Milwaukee   ------=_NextPart_000_0011_01BE5AA9.6A861EA0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 = http-equiv=3DContent-Type><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 = HTML//EN"> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>As a Roman Catholic, an = organist and=20 organ builder I have had my fill of all the demands and politics of not = only the=20 Roman Church, but all of them.&nbsp; I still occasionally go to mass or=20 services, especially on the big Holy days.&nbsp; I love the Easter = season and=20 wouldn't miss these events.&nbsp; </FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>I now, sometimes, attend = mass at The=20 Church of the Great Spirit, Catholic, in Milwaukee.&nbsp; This is the = Native=20 American Church here and the liturgy incorporates Native music, dance, = prayers=20 and traditions.&nbsp; All of these things plus my many trips to the = South Dakota=20 &quot;Holy Places&quot;, such as Bear Butte, Wounded Knee, or the = Badlands for=20 quiet contemplation and the lifting of my spirit to the All Holy are my = religion=20 now.</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>As much as I love the organ, = it's music,=20 good liturgy, Mozart, Widor, Bach, Guillemont, I equally love the music = of the=20 wind and the circling eagle.&nbsp; As much as I love the beauty of = Gothic=20 churches and stained glass, I love the &quot;church&quot; of the = wilderness in=20 the Black Hills, or the Bijou Hills.&nbsp; </FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>The Great Spirit is always = there and=20 always speaks to me.</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Dominic Joseph Radanovich,=20 Milwaukee</FONT></STRONG></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_0011_01BE5AA9.6A861EA0--