PipeChat Digest #718 - Monday, February 22, 1999
 
Re: Pilcher
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Pilcher
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
First Sunday in Lent, Oak Cliff Lutheran Church
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Pilcher
  by <Cpmnhartus@aol.com>
Re: more Pilcher recollections
  by "John  M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com>
Re: more Pilcher recollections
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
howdy
  by "Shane Hecker" <shanehecker@earthlink.net>
Re: Pilcher
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: howdy
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Shane Hecker
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Shane Hecker
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Pilcher From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 06:44:19 -0600   Bud/burgie wrote:   > Local legend has it that Pilcher retired to California, where he built > one final opus for St. James Episcopal in La Jolla (now replaced by an > Austin). Anybody know anything more about this?   The firm of Henry Pilcher's Sons of Louisville, Kentucky, was taken over by M. P. M=F6ller in 1944. William Edward Pilcher, Sr., died in Louisvil= le in 1946. William Edward Pilcher, Jr., became the M=F6ller representative= in Charlotte, North Carolina, and died there in 1968. Mrs. Pilcher was stil= l alive at least until recently and living in Louisville. I have met her o= n a couple of Organ Historical Society conventions, including the Louisvill= e one of 1993.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Pilcher From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 06:17:48 -0800       John L. Speller wrote:   > Bud/burgie wrote: > > > Local legend has it that Pilcher retired to California, where he buil= t > > one final opus for St. James Episcopal in La Jolla (now replaced by a= n > > Austin). Anybody know anything more about this? > > The firm of Henry Pilcher's Sons of Louisville, Kentucky, was taken ove= r > by M. P. M=F6ller in 1944. William Edward Pilcher, Sr., died in Louisv= ille > in 1946. William Edward Pilcher, Jr., became the M=F6ller representati= ve in > Charlotte, North Carolina, and died there in 1968. Mrs. Pilcher was st= ill > alive at least until recently and living in Louisville. I have met her= on > a couple of Organ Historical Society conventions, including the Louisvi= lle > one of 1993. > > John.   Hmmm ... St. James' building dates from the roaring twenties ... inside, = it looks for all the world like the deco lobby of your local Bijou, though I think they've taken out the fake palm trees in recent years. But the Moorish-Spanish wall sconces are still there, complete with fake candle b= ulbs. So ... the organ COULD have been built when the building was, and Pilcher would have still be active at that point. Numerous natives assure me that= it WAS a Pilcher; most add the legend about it being Pilcher's last instrume= nt.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: First Sunday in Lent, Oak Cliff Lutheran Church From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 14:18:54 EST   OAK CLIFF LUTHERAN CHURCH Dallas, Texas   February 21, 1999 First Sundy in Lent 10:00 A.M. Eucharist   Prelude: Through Adam's Downfall (Orgelbuchlein) - J.S. Bach Hymn: "Praise and Thanks and Adoration" FREU DICH SEHR Anthem: "A Lenten Prayer" - R. Powell Hymn: "O Jesus, I Have Promised" MUNICH Offertory: Prelude on "St. Cross" - R.H. Haan Hymn: "The Glory of These Forty Days" ERHALT UNS, HERR Postlude: Praeludium et Fuga in d minor (BWV539) - J.S. Bach   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster http://members.tripod.com/~organist_johng/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Pilcher From: Cpmnhartus@aol.com Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 20:06:18 EST   Copeman Hart - America Oak Ridge, Tennessee 21 February 1999   Mrs. Pilcher (Camille) is still alive and quite well, having celebrated her 91st birthday on the 7th of this month. Not long after her husband died, she returned to her native city of Johnson City, Tennessee where she has lived for many years. She played the violin in the Johnson City Symphony Orchestra until a few years ago.   My wife, a friend from Knoxville, and friends of ours in Johnson City honored Camille recently with a birthday party. Camille has been a friend of ours for many years.   You will be pleased to learn that Camille still talks fondly of her visit to the OHS Convention in Louisville.   If any of you wish to send her birthday greetings, you may do so by sending her an Email in care of me at < Cpmnhartus@aol.com >. I will forward all messages to Camille promptly.   Cheerio.   George   George W. Bayley Senior U. S. Consultant Copeman Hart - America 107 East Pasadena Road Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-5112   Tel. & Fax. 423 482 8600 Toll Free. 1 800 773 4858   Copeman Hart & Company LTD Church Organ Builders IRTHLINGBOROUGH Northamptonshire ENGLAND NN9 5TZ   Tel. +44 1933 652600 http://www.copemanhart.co.uk   Copeman Hart Australia Email < hamilton.stives@bigpond.com >. Peter Hamilton  
(back) Subject: Re: more Pilcher recollections From: "John M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 21:12:08 -0000   St. Luke's in Orlando has a large 4 manual Tellers - I believe it was one of their last. I played a recital there a couple of years ago. It is all in the west gallery and sounds magnificent in there. Of course in those acoustics anything would sound good. Has a real Aeolian-Skinner sound.   JOHN          
(back) Subject: Re: more Pilcher recollections From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 18:22:48 -0800   OK, so it was TELLERS and not Hillgreen-Lane ... DUH! Yet another "Senior Moment" ... I THINK they retained at least some of the Pilcher pipework. But in the west gallery?? That must have been built after my time ... Tellers started out rebuilding the organ in its original location in the south aisle, and there was no west gallery, just a swallow's nest for the echo over the baptistry. Maybe they moved it after the chancel burned. Yes, those acoustics are WONDERFUL!   Cheers,   Bud   John M. Doney wrote:   > St. Luke's in Orlando has a large 4 manual Tellers - I believe it was one of > their last. I played a recital there a couple of years ago. It is all in > the west gallery and sounds magnificent in there. Of course in those > acoustics anything would sound good. Has a real Aeolian-Skinner sound. > > JOHN > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: howdy From: "Shane Hecker" <shanehecker@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 20:22:27 -0600   Howdy, I recently joined this list. My name is Shane Hecker. Just wanted to say hi and tell you a little about me.   I'm currently a college student at Texas A&M. I'm doing a co-op with Cooper Tire in Texarkana, Texas. Actually, I live on the Texas side and Cooper is on the Arkansas side. It's been fun thus far. I have several hobbies, one of which is playing the organ. No, I'm not a professional, but I do like the way they sound. One of my dreams is to build a pipe organ. I don't know much about them, but I do know this. They are very complicated and every one of them is different. I've been in a pipe room before and seen (with the hands, not eyes) what some of the pipes look like. If this confuses you, look at it from a blind persons perspective. I've also heard a few terms such as swell, grade (or is it grate?), registration, and wind chest, and I think I know what they are. On occasion, I might get the grate and swell reversed. Now I have some questions for you. Do you know where I can get lots of information about how a pipe organ is built? What types of materials are needed? I know that the pipes sit on top of the wind chest, and that they are seated in a soft wood, (poplar, I believe). I also know that the framing for the chest is usually made from ply wood. The bellows, (you might say the air stablizers) and valves are made of leather, and most of the ductwork I saw is made out of metal. Some pipes are metal, some are wood, and some I don't know what they are made of. Where can you get instruments? Thanks for any information you can provide.   Shane    
(back) Subject: Re: Pilcher From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 21:30:23 -0500 (EST)   =A0 >You will be pleased to learn that Camille still > talks fondly of her visit to the OHS Convention > in Louisville.   Thanks, George, I had several meals with her and her grandson, I believe, at the OHS Louisville convention. They are wonderful people. Glad she's doing well. Please give her my best and a special happy birthday wish.   PS: I always get a chuckle when I read your e-mail address. On first glance, it looks like Latin! ;-)   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net    
(back) Subject: Re: howdy From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 19:15:23 -0800       Shane Hecker wrote:   > Howdy, I recently joined this list. My name is Shane Hecker. Just wanted to > say hi and tell you a little about me. > > I'm currently a college student at Texas A&M. I'm doing a co-op with Cooper > Tire in Texarkana, Texas. Actually, I live on the Texas side and Cooper is > on the Arkansas side. It's been fun thus far. I have several hobbies, one of > which is playing the organ. No, I'm not a professional, but I do like the > way they sound. > One of my dreams is to build a pipe organ. I don't know much about them, but > I do know this. They are very complicated and every one of them is > different. I've been in a pipe room before and seen (with the hands, not > eyes) what some of the pipes look like. If this confuses you, look at it > from a blind persons perspective. I've also heard a few terms such as swell, > grade (or is it grate?), registration, and wind chest, and I think I know > what they are. On occasion, I might get the grate and swell reversed.   Hi, Shane!   It's Great, G-R-E-A-T ... Hauptwerk in German, Hoofdwerk in Dutch, Grand Orgue in French.   The Swell is called Schwellwerk in German, I don't know what in Dutch (most old Dutch organs don't have them ... grin!), and Recit in French.   The third manual, called Choir or Positive in English, is called Positiv in German, Rugwerk in Dutch, and Positif in French. In old organs, the Positive sits on the balcony rail, behind the organist's back.   You need to know the names in at least those languages, because organs built in the various national styles use them, even in American.   > Now I have some questions for you. Do you know where I can get lots of > information about how a pipe organ is built?   Oh, Lord ... here we go with the bibliography by memory again (grin):   The Contemporary American Organ - Willian Barnes Temple of Tone - George Audsley (may be out of print) The Amateur Organ-Builder - Mark Wicks (available from Organ Literature Foundation) - may be "Organ Building for Amateurs" ... my copy is long-gone   There's a two-volume work by Audsley, but the name escapes me at the moment. There are lots of more contemporary works ... I'm sure other list members will be able to fill in the titles.   More specialized are two books about French organs by Fenner Douglass: The Language of the French Classic Organ, and Cavaille-Coll and the Musicians.   Organ Historical Society has printed or reprinted several books about various American builders, and Orpha Ochse wrote what is probably the definitive work about American organ-building before 1900, but as usual I can't remember the title.   You should get a subscription to The Diapason, The American Organist, and The Tracker (journal of the Organ Historical Society). Am I correct in assuming that you're visually-challenged? If so, I think some of the above may be available in Braille, or on tape. If not, I'll volunteer to read at least summaries of the most interesting articles onto tape for you. Do you have a VCR? I can get more audio onto a VCR tape in 6-hour mode than I can cassette tapes. I'll be slow this time of year, though ... Easter is early this year, and I'm organist in a high Anglican church with LOTS of long services. Maybe other list members would have time to help as well.     > What types of materials are > needed? I know that the pipes sit on top of the wind chest, and that they > are seated in a soft wood, (poplar, I believe). I also know that the framing > for the chest is usually made from ply wood.   Good builders will tell you that plywood has no place ANYWHERE in a good organ. Seasoned hardwood, period. That's one of the reasons pipe organs are so expensive ... the supply of good hardwood is almost exhausted in this country.   > The bellows, (you might say the > air stablizers) and valves are made of leather, and most of the ductwork I > saw is made out of metal. Some pipes are metal, some are wood, and some I > don't know what they are made of.   Perhaps the shapes confused you, but all organ pipes are wood or metal of some description (or sometimes a combination of the two), except for some historical curiosities where the pipes were made of ivory, glass, or even stone. Mark Wicks tells how to make pipes out of paper mache; I once heard an organ with paper mache pipes ... it was very soft and sweet-toned.   > Where can you get instruments?   The New Theatre Organ Classifieds   http://theatreorgans.com/ads/wtsello.htm   and the Organ Clearing House   http://www.tneorg.com/och/   websites both carry lists of used instruments for sale. The Theatre Organ Classifieds also carry lists of used electronic organs.   > Thanks for > any information you can provide. > > Shane >   Cheers,   Bud Clark St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church Newport Beach CA USA    
(back) Subject: Shane Hecker From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 22 Feb 1999 00:03:54 -0500   Hi, Shane... Welcome to the flock. I am sure we will do our best to help you in any way we can. Who knows?...you might even learn something from us.   Rick Veague dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net http://www.svs.net/Dutch      
(back) Subject: Re: Shane Hecker From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 21 Feb 1999 21:16:00 -0800   More like WE'LL learn something from HIM (grin)!   Bud   VEAGUE wrote:   > Hi, Shane... Welcome to the flock. I am sure we will do our best to help > you in any way we can. Who knows?...you might even learn something from us. > > Rick Veague dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net http://www.svs.net/Dutch > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org