PipeChat Digest #726 - Saturday, February 27, 1999
 
A tribute to village organists
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Re: STOPS!!
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
Re: Speaking of WANAMAKER...
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
Re: STOPS!!
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "Travis Evans" <tle6399@seward.cune.edu>
Re: WANAMAKER ORGAN
  by "straight" <straight@infoblvd.net>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "shirley vanest" <koehnken@comsys.net>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "Jerry" <aqne@waveinter.com>
Re: A tribute to a village organist----
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Re: New Job
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: New Job
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: WANAMAKER ORGAN
  by "Joe Vitacco" <jvitacco@interactive.net>
Re: WANAMAKER ORGAN
  by "Joe Vitacco" <jvitacco@interactive.net>
Re: New Job
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
JAV, was WANAMAKER ORGAN
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: New Job
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Pierre Cochereau.
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "Matt Baker" <poinsettia@netxn.com>
Re: Fw: New Job
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: New Job
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
RE: A tribute to village organists
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: New Job
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Fw: New Job
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
 


(back) Subject: A tribute to village organists From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 10:53:25 -0800   Let's not be so hard on the village organists ... they were/are faithful, underpaid (or UNpaid), and they were/are faithful servants. Some who helped shape my love of music and the organ:   Mrs. A.K. ("Addie") Wood, Mulberry Methodist Church, Mulberry, FL ... Mrs. Wood guarded that old 7-rank tubular pneumatic Estey with her LIFE; she kept a choir in the loft by force of will (she once recruited half the basketball team with the help of the coach, her only tenor, in order to have enough men for a Christmas cantata!). And there WAS a cantata every Christmas and every Easter, a prelude and an anthem and a postlude every Sunday, for the 50+ years she served that church. And she wouldn't HEAR of replacing the Estey with ANYTHING but another pipe organ. When the new church was finally built, the little new pipe organ by a local builder was dedicated in her memory.   Mrs. C.C. ("Pet") Harper, Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Bartow, FL. "Miss Pet" was a character ... she played for all the local beauty pageants, livestock shows in the arena, Kiwanis, Lions, etc. She was fond of bracelets ... LOTS of bracelets. The choir used to follow the jangle of them during Mass. She was so hard on the old composition plastic stop tongues of the little Moller Artiste from the thirties that they had to be replaced about once a year. Her favorite trick was to play the beginning of Debussy's "Clair de Lune" when the priest put the Host in the Monstrance at Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. But she was a good and generous soul ... between her and her mother (from whom she inherited the unpaid position), they probably had over a hundred years of service to that parish. The best lesson she taught me was not to take ANYTHING too seriously. She was a big woman with an infectious laugh ...   Miss Margaret Clark (no relation; well, maybe third cousin twice removed .... EVERYBODY is related SOMEHOW in the South). Miss Margaret ran the high school chorus and the choir of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Bartow, FL with an iron hand. I think I learned from her that NOTHING is impossible. In a country high school of 500 students, 150 were in the mixed chorus, which put on a very tidy "Messiah" every Christmas and a Broadway show or a G & S operetta every Spring. In a town of 12,000 people, her community chorus mounted "Die Fledermaus" AND the Bach b minor Mass, thank you very much. She simply wouldn't take "no" for an answer. She had no budget, no library, and precious little support from the school district (when she died, the high school program collapsed for several years, until my cousin became the principal ... Miss Henrie remembered Miss Clark from when she was the circuit-riding music teacher for the entire county). An alumni chorus still puts on "Messiah" every year in her memory.   Miss Tessie Dietz and Mrs. Mary Kazinski, Sacred Heart RC in Oberlin and St. Mary's RC in Lorain, OH, respectively. No one will ever know the sacrifices generations of daily-Mass-singers like these women made. Miss Tessie played a wheezy old two-manual Mason and Hamlin reed organ; her voice was long-gone, but she KNEW liturgy. Oberlin students, monsters of ego that they were/are, used to joke about Miss Tessie, but strangely enough none could ever be found to take her place when she was ill, or wanted a vacation. THAT was too early in the MORNING (!)   Mary Kasinski was a pistol ... she'd had to retire from directing the choir at St. Mary's, but she still played the organ ... with both hands and both feet. And, God love her, they still put on the Faure Requiem or something similar every year, accompanied by the mighty 4-rank Wicks.   Prof. Sylvestro Biaggi, Holy Rosary RC, Cleveland ... six daily Masses six days a week and seven Sunday Masses, at age 82. Enough said!   So ... you youngsters chomping at the bit to have your own organ bench to sit upon ... have a little respect (grin)!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 14:34:19 EST   Dear Bud, Well you always have something good to say. Firstly, I found only one Mass, Regina Coeli , in my personal collection of dead sea scrolls. Been a while since I went through the archives.Will be in the mail Monday. It is almost as old as I am. You mention village organists who influenced your life. There were two in mine; one was Lorraine Kowrach Hutchins, who, til this day, at age 65, drives down from Watertown, NY. and plays the weekend at St.Mary's BVM in Dickson City, Pa. I remember when she was HS Student and played the old Hammond there. The other was a nun, Sr. Marie CeceliaMc Millan, of Marywood College, one tough Scotch Irishman who told me that, after making the big money, I would be back. BEcause I had perfect pitch she would tell me that she loved my ears. LOL. Well, I never made the big money but I'm back. She sure could play that old Aeolian Skinner in the Rotunda .I developed an appreciation for Bach from her. For me to practice, I had to play the service at St. patrick's so I would have an organ with 32 pedals. All I had a t home was a M-3 Spinet with 13 pedals. I really didn't get an AGO console until 2 years ago that I could call my own. Those were the good old days.Hah. Sincerely, Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: STOPS!! From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 12:18:00 PST   >Does Wicks organ co. have a website?     Yes they do. It's www.wicks.com/organ   This new technology of sampling every single pipe sounds very interesting and I'm sure the sound is out of this world! Travis stumbled on Briston's web site and they had a demonstration of their organs, and he nor I could believe the quality of sound that it had! And it wasn't even their top of the line model! I was blown away by the fact that a digital organ could sound that much like a pipe!   Chris Mullen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of WANAMAKER... From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 12:19:31 PST   >Is there a specification of the Wanamaker organ online anywhere that any >of you know of? I've seen a site or two featuring the organ but no >spec.     Yes there is. http://www.tp4.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/~tk/wnmkr.stoplist   I printed one off myself the other day. Rather interesting I might add.   Chris Mullen       ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: STOPS!! From: Jason McGuire <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 12:34:26 -0800   Hi,   I'm new to Pipe Chat and have been catching some of the conversation on various digital organs, but I have only seen some of the replies, missing other discussion on them. I'm curious about the one you refer to below ... is this digital a Wick's creation or is it Walker technology? How can I get to hear it, procure a CD, etc?   Jason McGuire   Chris Mullen wrote: > > >Does Wicks organ co. have a website? > > Yes they do. It's www.wicks.com/organ > > This new technology of sampling every single pipe sounds very > interesting and I'm sure the sound is out of this world! Travis > stumbled on Briston's web site and they had a demonstration of their > organs, and he nor I could believe the quality of sound that it had! > And it wasn't even their top of the line model! I was blown away by the > fact that a digital organ could sound that much like a pipe! > > Chris Mullen > > ______________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: Travis Evans <tle6399@seward.cune.edu> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 14:40:14 -0500 (CDT)   I would have to say the organist who has inspired me the most would be my Mom. I grew up watching her play at my home church. She even helped me when I was teaching myself to read music and play, at the young age of 3. She is not the most proficient organist but she gets the job done quite accuratly, my playing skills passed her up when I was in junior high. She has helped me learn how to play for services, and is probably the best page turner I have had. She has always been there encouraging me, along with my dad. My dad even played a little when I was younger, so I guess it was just meant for me to be an organist. I think I have surprised a few people with my playing, considering my limited lessons. You can ask Chris about that. :) But if it weren't for God and my mom and dad, I don't think any of what I have accomplished would have been possible.   Travis Evans   tle6399@seward.cune.edu tlevans@shawneelink.com   "When I hear music, I fear no evil"    
(back) Subject: Re: WANAMAKER ORGAN From: straight <straight@infoblvd.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 16:17:45 -0500   I will be going to Philly next week, to the Flower Show, and we would very much like a chance to see this organ. Does anybody know when it is played? We'll be there Mon. and Tues., part of Wed. Actually, we didn't know it still existed until we saw you people talking about it, and I went and hunted up their web page. Diane Straight Organist/Accompanist Almond Union of Churches -- (straight@infoblvd.net)  
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: "shirley vanest" <koehnken@comsys.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 16:21:19 -0500   Agree with Travis Evans. My mother played 50 years and if I didn't learn anything else I learned about being committed. After the 45 years I've played, sometimes I felt I was the one who should be committed and forget committment. She was probably the best beginning piano teacher I have ever known. Let's don't sell the little old ladies in the small country churches short+ACEAIQAh- I did a good job at what I did even if I didn't play Bach. I enjoy playing some Bach but I enjoy hymn transcriptions, also. I learned early on I was there to enhance the service, not be the star attraction. Sorry I climbed on the soap box, but you cannot educate the general public musically and even tho my home church had college professors, many school teachers, farmers and just plain folks, they liked what I did and as I said, I did it well.    
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: Jerry <aqne@waveinter.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 17:03:59 -0500   Very well said   shirley vanest wrote:   > Agree with Travis Evans. My mother played 50 years and if I didn't learn > anything else I learned about being committed. After the 45 years I've > played, sometimes I felt I was the one who should be committed and forget > committment. She was probably the best beginning piano teacher I have ever > known. Let's don't sell the little old ladies in the small country churches > short+ACEAIQAh- I did a good job at what I did even if I didn't play Bach. I > enjoy playing some Bach but I enjoy hymn transcriptions, also. I learned > early on I was there to enhance the service, not be the star attraction. > Sorry I climbed on the soap box, but you cannot educate the general public > musically and even tho my home church had college professors, many school > teachers, farmers and just plain folks, they liked what I did and as I said, > I did it well. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to a village organist---- From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 17:05:19 EST   Hello List--- This is a recollection of a small town organist/composer/choirmaster------ My first organ teacher,,and the man who taught me the fundamentals of repair work,,as it applied to Austin organs, was 75 when I was 11 and started lessons with him. He had designed and spec'ed out the Austin 3/50, 1913 and had played it ALL his life,,he had settled in our small town right after college. Over his years,,he wrote about 15 cantata's, numerous preludes and postludes, choral benedictions,,and the like, he was AAGO,,and ASCAP as well, never drove a car his entire life,,,walked or trained wherever he went, ran an insurance agency in town to supplement his meager income from the church, lived across the street from the church, did all the repairs on the Austin himself, and tuned it as well. I started lessons with J.Stainer's "the organ" and seeing the line drawings of the legs with high button shoes on them,,and as well,,my teacher wore them in the 50's yet already, for a bit I felt horribly out of place with my penny loafers on the pedal clavier. But I still persevered,,and still wear penny loafers to play. This gentlemen played almost 60 years for our church,,,and just quietly stopped one nite in his sleep. I was devastated. So was the Childrens Choir School, (5 churches, 200 voices) and as well the church. I inherited some of his own music,,especially the ones that I thought were very nice and told him so,,,he willed them to me. And about a year later after his death and at the Festival of Graduation for the children's choir school, I got to play the Recessional that he had written for the school at the turn of the century, which was,,,I might add,,the first time it had been played at graduation by anyone other than "composer at the console" as the program always said. And, it was played from the original manuscript. Yeah,,,memories,,,,,small town redneckedness and /or ignorance,,,,I dont think so!   Regards,. --Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 14:06:22 PST   >(mass snippage) Prof. Sylvestro Biaggi, Holy Rosary RC, Cleveland ... six daily Masses >six days a week and seven Sunday Masses, at age 82. Enough said! > >So ... you youngsters chomping at the bit to have your own organ bench >to sit upon ... have a little respect (grin)! > >Cheers, > >Bud   Very well said Bud. I do appreciate all that the "village organists" do for parishes and congregations all over the country. The organist that used to be at our church, Louise Browne, was pulled into the job when the old organist (this was before my time) either left or passed away. Our congregation is about 100 people, and we dedicated a new sanctuary in 1982 (when I was 2) and got a new Rodgers Essex 640 when I was 7 or 8. Louise did not play well, and never learned the pedals (thank God for the continuo button on the Rodgers), but she was ALWAYS there and tried her hardest. And she always let me watch and look at the organ while she played her postlude. That, plus a few other things, is what interested me in the organ. And I was blessed by God with the talent to learn to play, and now I am recieving the blessing of learning the finer points of music and literature to make this my full time work. I thank God every time I practice for the ability to play. But I wish I had my own organ bench in a church! I miss playing for services and the more experience I can get while I'm in college will help me in the future. But, alas, there aren't any positions that I know of available in the Seward area. But, God will provide.   Chris Mullen     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: "Chris Mullen" <nascarfreak1039@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 14:22:50 PST   >I think I have surprised a few people with my playing, considering my >limited lessons. You can ask Chris about that. :) But if it weren't for >God and my mom and dad, I don't think any of what I have accomplished >would have been possible. > >Travis Evans     He has gotten quite a few amazed looks out of people around here! Including myself! Very well said Trav.   Chris Mullen   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: KurtvonS@aol.com Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 17:51:30 EST   Hi Shirley, Welcome to this bunch of unique people! I know that you are used to unique people after living with Ken for a few years! You tell him that Kurt says Hi...! Kurt von Schakel  
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 16:56:32 -0600   bruce cornely wrote:   > education and experience in church music. Experience is best obtained > by experiencing it! Sing in choirs of accomplished musicians: you   Oops: Let's find another method. No accomplished musicians around here...   > will learn choral literature, organ literature, hymns, service playing,   Oops: Our choir sings the same pieces, the "organist" plays the same songs, the same hymns are sung, just on a four month round...   krc        
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 18:19:58 EST     Opps! that of course also means yourself Kevin when you speak of NO accomplished organists,,,,heheheheh Since none of you are accomplished, you all might as well stay where you are, and keep the playing field level! <G>   Cheers, --Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: WANAMAKER ORGAN From: jvitacco@interactive.net (Joe Vitacco) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 18:50:57 +0000   Peter Conte. He is amazing.   Has transcribed the Sorcerer's Apprentice which he recorded on my label on the 207 rank organ of NYC's Riverside Church. JAV 112   Joe Vitacco www.greatorgancds.com  
(back) Subject: Re: WANAMAKER ORGAN From: jvitacco@interactive.net (Joe Vitacco) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 18:54:24 +0000   Peter Conte is the new court organist. He is amazing! Like Virgil Fox level.   Has transcribed the Sorcerer's Apprentice which he recorded on my label on the 207 rank organ of NYC's Riverside Church. "Comes Summer time" 1998 (JAV 112)   Mr. Conte records for Dorian Records.   Joe Vitacco www.greatorgancds.com  
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: KurtvonS@aol.com Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 19:06:58 EST   In a message dated 2/27/99 5:12:55 PM Central Standard Time, kevin1@alaweb.com writes:   << Oops: Our choir sings the same pieces, the "organist" plays the same songs, the same hymns are sung, just on a four month round... >> After spending 23 years at a position in a major city, I am now in a mid-sized town that many would call "redneck". After spending years fighting againt cheapening of the style and performance of music at my former job, it is a refreshing change to find such friendly and supoportive people here. To me it seems that you'll get out of it what you put in; if you have a "holier than thou" attitude, you're not going to be asked over to Sunday dinner very often! I have found most of the other musicians here to be almost starving for new ideas, and I'm pleased to be able to offer my help and advice when I can. My choir also shares in this program of "spreading the musical gospel" (remember, Luther; "Music is the handmaiden of the Gospel") at other churches in the area. This Lenten season, for example, we are singing in the Episcopal church and a large Southern Baptist church, as well as our own Christian Church, Disiples of Christ. People here are really receptive to this new music; like Tschesnekoff and Jehan Alain! It was difficult for me for many years to "lower" myself to the people's level. Imagine my surprise when I discovered the real trick was to get the people excited by quality and equality, in any style! Kurt  
(back) Subject: JAV, was WANAMAKER ORGAN From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 17:22:19 -0800   At 06:54 PM 2/27/1999 +0000, Joe Vitacco wrote:   >Has transcribed the Sorcerer's Apprentice which he recorded on my label >on the 207 rank organ of NYC's Riverside Church. "Comes Summer time" >1998 (JAV 112) >   Just a note to pipechatters:   I've just received various releases from JAV, one of which was one of the Riverside Church recordings. If you love excellent recordings of notable A-S instruments, played with a varied and interesting repertoire by top-notch artists, by all means get some of these CDs! I rate them as the best available!   Cheers,   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 20:20:35 -0500 (EST)     >Experience is best obtained by experiencing it! =A0> Sing in choirs of accomplished musicians: > you   >Oops: Let's find another method. No > accomplished musicians around here... Kevin, I think if you will look around carefully you might find someone who knows more than you do. They might not be the greatest, but you can learn from anyone, even the "untrained". >will learn choral literature, organ literature, > hymns, service playing, >Oops: Our choir sings the same pieces, the > "organist" plays the same songs, the same > hymns are sung, just on a four month round... Then go visit another church. Look around! You should experience several denominational styles of worship and be comfortable in them in order to be well-rounded. Again, the music programs don't have to be on par with St. Thomas NYC, but if the person has been there fore a while they are doing something right, which you might benefit from learning. Try to approach these places positively and humbly!   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Pierre Cochereau. From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 20:55:22 -0500 (EST)   Responding to the comment about Cochereau's improvs being predominantly loud, that was the point I was trying to make in my initial improv salvo. Just because one has 899 ranks at his disposal does not imply that one should use all 899 of them at once all the time. Further, fortissimos are always most thrilling when they have been preceded by pianos, and mezzos (p and f). This creates a sense of anticipation for the listener. Improv is also aural drama.    
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: Matt Baker <poinsettia@netxn.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 17:59:47 -0800   Chris Mullen wrote:   > Very well said Bud. I do appreciate all that the "village organists" do > for parishes and congregations all over the country. The organist that > used to be at our church, Louise Browne, was pulled into the job when > the old organist (this was before my time) either left or passed away. > Our congregation is about 100 people, and we dedicated a new sanctuary > in 1982 (when I was 2) and got a new Rodgers Essex 640 when I was 7 or > 8. Louise did not play well, and never learned the pedals (thank God > for the continuo button on the Rodgers), but she was ALWAYS there and > tried her hardest. And she always let me watch and look at the organ > while she played her postlude. That, plus a few other things, is what > interested me in the organ.   I hear you here. I used to do this whe I was a kid too, go up front and watch the organist play during postlude! (I started this when I was 4) Back then my only exposure to organists and pianists were the ladies who played at church. So, when some family members told me I ought to take lessons, in my "infinite wisdom" at age 6 I pointed out "But only ladies play piano/organ...right?!" Fortunately I was quickly reassured that this *isn't* true!   At least I plan to get around to finally learning to play this year! :)   -- < Transmit src: poinsettia@netxn.com ID1 LCARS Channel 1 Lineout > YuSeEkMeAtNo31101993 http://www.netxn.com/~poinsettia/index.html Pizza-Delivery Illustrated: http://members.xoom.com/hlrmatt/index.html      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: New Job From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 21:06:02 -0500 (EST)   Something that puzzles me a lot. A lot of churches in Redneckville are investing in good organs. So, somebody appreciates the value of a good instrument. To generalize is to misrepresent.    
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 21:12:25 -0500 (EST)   Amen, Bruce!! Preach on.    
(back) Subject: RE: A tribute to village organists From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 19:34:00 -0700   > I wish I had my > own organ bench in a church! I miss playing for services   When I was just out of high school, I went to Wayne state in Detroit to major in Church Music. I always had a bench, even after I dropped out of college to get married (big mistake). A new marriage didn't agree with the demands of church organ work, so I gave up the church job. The marriage failed some years later. Eventually I married Nancy, who was a theatre organ enthusiast, and plays a bit too. We acquired organ after organ until now we have a theatre organ and a classical. But never a church job, until this year.   Finally I'm "back on the bench", and I love it. I think I would have been better off to dump the first bride instead of the church job.   Dennis    
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 20:18:50 -0600   GRSCoLVR@aol.com wrote: > > Opps! that of course also means yourself Kevin when you speak of NO > accomplished organists,,,,heheheheh   Of course. I'm only 16 and living in a hole-in-the-ground. OF COURSE I'm not accomplished...yet. (Hopefully I will be as soon as I get away from Greenville).   krc        
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: New Job From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 20:25:19 -0600   N Brown wrote: > > Something that puzzles me a lot. A lot of churches in Redneckville are > investing in good > organs. So, somebody appreciates the value > of a good instrument. > To generalize is to misrepresent.   What?? Name a minimum of 20 examples in south Alabama.   krc