PipeChat Digest #727 - Sunday, February 28, 1999
 
Re: Kiddie Organs
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: New Job
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Yes, there are organs in South Alabama.
  by "Stanley B. Littleton" <littles@digitalexp.com>
Re:STOPS and WALKER TECHNOLOGY
  by "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net>
Re: New Job
  by "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net>
Re: STOPS!!
  by "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net>
Re: STOPS!!WALKER TECH
  by "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net>
Re: A tribute to village organists
  by "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net>
RE:Organist jobs
  by "jeffrey korns" <jakorns@worldnet.att.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Kiddie Organs From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 20:53:35 -0600   John L. Speller wrote: > Tracker* 29:4:26, where David Fox and Bill Van Pelt describe it as "a kind > of seat-activated 'general cancel' for a plumbing fixture."   I KNEW there was some way to keep it on-topic... ;-)   krc      
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 22:07:37 -0600   >GRSCoLVR@aol.com wrote: >> >> Opps! that of course also means yourself Kevin when you speak of NO >> accomplished organists,,,,heheheheh > >Of course. I'm only 16 and living in a hole-in-the-ground.   Kevin you and I have had some interesting posts in the past. We have shared some very fine theater organ recordings. I respect you for your interest and knowledge about organs. Playing an instrument well does not relate to where the person is located. I play regularly on both clarinet and saxophone. I have played some piano and organ but sort of like some people sing in the shower. Keyboards are NOT my forte. My jazz group plays several times monthly. My mother played in the Congregational Church in Kiowa, Kansas (population now is about 1500) for 29 1/2 years. She played a Hammond after having earned a degree in performance on both piano and organ and she taught as many as 60 students a week. My dad was owned a couple of wheat grain elevators and that is why they were in Kiowa. When dad retired, they moved to Hutchinson, Kansas and mom played for about fifteen years in the Christian Science church where she had played the dedication recital some 45 years earlier. The organ was a Reuter (a very beautiful instrument). Her organ study was of course on pipe organ. She did not like the Hammond but always did here very best to try and play "good" music. A large number of her students are still playing both piano and organ and are in small towns. Mother passed away a year ago January 26, the day before my dad's birthday. He is now 94 and still talks about mom's music and how much she shared with others. You have a pipe organ in your home and you say you live in a "hole in the ground?"   >OF COURSE I'm not accomplished...yet. (Hopefully I will be as soon as I >get >away from Greenville).   Kevin I hate to tell you but unless you begin to look to others for inspiration (regardless of their competance, you will NOT be accomplished.....ever. Leaving Greenville will not make you accomplished. Ten to twenty years of study with a fine instructor will begin your trip toward being an accomplished organist. Kevin please don't insult your parents by saying you live in a hole-in-the-ground!   The term attitude adjustment comes to mind. Please know that ALL the post's I've read so far are trying to help realize how many, many years it takes to become accomplished.   Your friend, (I hope)   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Yes, there are organs in South Alabama. From: "Stanley B. Littleton" <littles@digitalexp.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 22:14:22 -0600   Subject: Re: Fw: New Job From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 20:25:19 -0600   N Brown wrote: > > Something that puzzles me a lot. A lot of churches in Redneckville are > investing in good > organs. So, somebody appreciates the value > of a good instrument. > To generalize is to misrepresent.   What?? Name a minimum of 20 examples in south Alabama.   krc   ---------------------------   Well, Kevin, here are a few instruments to start the list of 20 decent to excellent organs in South Alabama. Most of these organs dat6e from the past 2 or 3 decades. I know of at least three churches within 75 miles of where I live that are in the process of buying something new and interesting.   Anyway, here's the start of a list for you:   St. John's Episcopal Church, Montgomery. Probably the best Wicks ever built. Thanks to Harald Rohlig!   First Methodist, Montgomery A rather interesting Schantz with a 2' Octave that will cut everybody's hair!   First Baptist, Dothan Another Schantz in a less than warm room, but a very playable instrument.   First Methodist, Dothan A Moeller that fails to fill a very dead room. Pity, since it is a very pleasant instrument.     Government Street Presbyterian, Mobile An relatively new Austin that is ~quite~ different from those tubby instruments of yesteryear.   If one is permitted to include "Lower Alabama", then I would strongly recommend the Kney at Christ Church, Pensacola.   If you mean small churches in small towns, then get thyself to Marianna, FL (population less than 7,000) and hear the A. David Moore at St. Luke's Episcopal. While playing a traditional English Evensong would require a bit of creative registration by hand, it can be done, and done very musically.   Don't despair, decent enthusiastic playing will bring out the donors, providing the need is really there. If you play it, they will give! ;>)   Stan -- http://www.digitalexp.com/~users/littles/default.htp   mailto:littles@digitalexp.com Stanley Littleton   "The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers and cities; but to know someone here and there who thinks and feels with us, and, though distant, is close to us in spirit this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden." -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe  
(back) Subject: Re:STOPS and WALKER TECHNOLOGY From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 23:57:50 -0500   At 02:39 AM 2/27/99 -0800, you wrote: > >I've heard of organs like this (Walker electronics) before, just didn't know which companies. Truly >the next-best thing to actual pipes. PIPES ARE BEST, OF COURSE, BUT NOT EVERYONE CAN GET WHAT THEY SHOULD HAVE!!   > So basically what you got is a big fat >sound card with lots of wavetable samples and a whole lot more polyphony than >your average Sound Blaster! ACTUALLY, WALKER USES REAL 'RECORDINGS' OF REAL PIPES, WITH THE INFORMATION PLACED ON HIGH-MEM CHIPS WITH THE INFORMATION REMOVEED ON DEMAND BY PLAYING NOTES AND PULLING STOPS.   >The big organ I'm looking at building for myself >will be similar, only the mega-quality won't be there. My small organ will be >straight analog. ANALOG IS FUN AND A LITTLE EASIER TO WORK WITH I SUPPOSE, BUT IF IT IS SOUND YOU ARED LOOKING FOR, GO LISTEN TO THE BETTER DIGITALS OUT THERE. >... > >> when the budget isn't there for all >> pipe, a combination of pipe and digital works very well. > >Pipe/electronic combo...probably using electronic for lower bass stops (where >timbre is less important, also no big pipes) and maybe mixtures (again timbre >less important, no need for hundreds of pipes, also they wouldn't go out of >tune)...IMHO, at least.   THE VESTAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ORGAN IN VESTAL NEW YORK ( A SUBURB OF BINGHAMTON) HAS 17 RANKS OF REAL, WELL DESIGNED PIPES INCLUDING DIAPASONS 16, 8, 4, 2 FLUTES 8,4,2 AND TWO SETS OF MIXTURES. ALL STRINGS AND REEDS ARE DIGITAL (THAT'S BECAUSE THE REAL PIPES CHANGE THEIR PITCHES IN THE SAME DIRECTION, SO HAVING THE REEDS ON AUTO-TUNE, THE COMPUTER MATCHES THE PIPES INTONATION WITHIN 3 SECONDS OF TURNING ON THE INSTRUMENT. THE CONTROL IS A SPECIAL THERMOMETER ATTACHED TO A PIPE . tHE THERMOMETER FEEDS THE INFORMATION TO THE COMPUTER WHICH ADJUSTS THE NONE-WINDED PIPES ACCORDINGLY.> THE 35 OTHER RANKS ARE ALL DIGITAL WITH NO BORROWING BETWEEN ANYTHING.   THE BUSINESS OF USING ELECTRONICS JUST FOR PEDAL ADD-ONS IS NOW ALMOST 'ORDINARY'. WORKS WELL, BUT WALKER MADE IT POSSIBLE TO HAVE MUCH MORE THAN EVER PREVIOUSLY.   WICKS (AND OTHERS) ARE USING WALKER TECHNOLOGY EQUIPMENT AROUND THE NATION --   WICKS IS REACHABLE AT WICKS.COM BUT EASIER TO CALL THEM (OR ME) FOR INFORMATION AT 618 654 2191. GETTING A TOUR OF THE FACTORY IS QUITE INTERESTING -- THGEY ARE ABOUT 40 MILES EAST OF ST. LOUIS IN HIGHLAND, IL, ON INTERSTATE 70 (well, actually, off of it about 5 miles -- follow the signs). LET THEM/ME KNOW YOU ARE COMING SO THEY CAN ARRANGE A ROYAL WELCOME -- PROBABLY FREE LUNCH, TOO!!!THEY ALSO HAPPEN TO RUN A FULL AIRCRAFT PARTS DIVISION (DELIVERIES WORLDWIDE) IF YOU ARE INTO THAT SORT OF THING!!!   SOMETHING MUST BE WORKING RIGHT --- WICKS IS BUILDING ALL COMBINATIONS OP DIGITAL AND PIPES AND THE FACTORY, WITH MORE THAN 75 PEOPLE ON FULL TIME, IS BEHIND ABOUT A YEAR AND A HALF AT THIS POINT.   VESTAL ORGAN BEING PERFORMED ON TUESDAY FEBRUARY MARCH 2ND WITH JANE WATTS AS GUEST ARTIST ON THE CHURCH'S ONGOING SERIES OF NOTABLES ... IF YOU ARE CLOSE ENOUGH, COME OVER -- I'LL MAKE SURE YOU GET A CHANCE TO PLAY AFTER THE PERFORMANCE!!   'NUFF?? Paul F. Stapel, 607 773 1495, FAX 607 772 6501, Binghamton, NY Organist, Piano Instructor, Sales Director for WICKS Organ Company.    
(back) Subject: Re: New Job From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1999 00:09:00 -0500   At 07:23 AM 2/27/99 >Paul F. Stapel wrote:>> AND NOW YOU KNOW WHY SO MANY ORGANISTS IN BIG TIME CITIES ARE NOT FROM THEM!! ( I can't really prove this point but it is reasonable!!) > AND THEN KRC WROTE >You can place my case in the record...I'm leaving Greenville at first >chance. > >krc > TOO BAD FOR GREENVILLE. MAYBE YOU CAN MAKE A 'COMEBACK' AFTER YOU HAVE HIT THE BIG TIME!! > > Paul F. Stapel, 607 773 1495, FAX 607 772 6501, Binghamton, NY Organist, Piano Instructor, Sales Director for WICKS Organ Company.    
(back) Subject: Re: STOPS!! From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1999 00:15:38 -0500   At 09:56 AM 2/27/99 -0500, Antoni wrote: >Hi Paul: >I would really like to hear these sampled sounds from Walker. How do I >get in touch with them? > >Antoni Scott > Call them in Zionsville, PA , tell them where you can travel to easily and see what they say or call, WICKS 618 654 2191 and find out where there are instruments in place   Where do you live?? Anywhere near the Southern Tier of New York...come here as usggested on a previous list -- Jane Watts plaing the 53 ranks combo on Tuesday March 2 at 7:30 PM   Paul F. Stapel, 607 773 1495, FAX 607 772 6501, Binghamton, NY Organist, Piano Instructor, Sales Director for WICKS Organ Company.    
(back) Subject: Re: STOPS!!WALKER TECH From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1999 00:22:25 -0500   At 10:56 AM 2/27/99 -0600, you wrote: >> >I played an organ for several months that had 10 'ranks' of Walker >electronics. Some of the stops (pedal 16' principal, swell III-IV Mixture) >were astoundingly impressive. Others (all the reeds, pedal 16' violone, >pedal 32' bourdon) were so bad that they were almost unusable. There were >other problems as well. Three of the stops played incorrect pitches, so >after seven months we had to have the president of Walker to come & sort >things out. The people from the company were great to deal with, though. >The organ builder handled most of this communication. > >Perhaps the electronic ranks' most obvious weakness (as with any electronic >additions) was in chorus. They used temp-tracking for tuning, so that >wasn't the major concern--the timbres just didn't blend in chorus. The more >organ used, the worse the blend was. > >By the way, this organ was originally a two-manual Wicks, & it had 32 ranks >of pipes to the 10 electronic ranks. After the rebuild, this was spread >over three manuals. > >PS - Our builder was RA Colby out of Tennessee--GREAT people to work with. >I recommend the Colbys highly! > >Thanks! >Mark >mahopper@bigfoot.com > PAUL STAPEL ANSWERS   REVOICING EVERYTHING SO THAT ALL SOUNDS WORK TOGETHER IS THE MOST DIFFICULT JOB, WHICH IS WHY ADDING DOESN'T ALWAYS WORK AS COMPARED TO BUILDING NEW .... AFTER MANY FRUSTRATING HOURS SPENT BY BOB WALKER ON THE COMPUTER AND A REALLY FINE VOICER ON THE PIPES A SUCCESSFUL COMPROMISE WAS REACHED AND , SINCE THAT TIME, MINOR ADJUSTMENTS HAVE BEEN MADE WHICH SMOOTHED A LOT OUT.. AND THE ELECTRONICS MAKE VOICING ADJUSTMENTS SO EASY...!! >> Paul F. Stapel, 607 773 1495, FAX 607 772 6501, Binghamton, NY Organist, Piano Instructor, Sales Director for WICKS Organ Company.    
(back) Subject: Re: A tribute to village organists From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1999 00:32:24 -0500   bUD, YOUR POINTS ARE SUPERB... I GUESS THE KIDS OF TODAY WANT TO HAVE IT ALL, NO MATTER WHAT FIELD THEY ARE IN!!   Paul Stapel   At 10:53 AM 2/27/99 -0800, you wrote: 7 Snday Masses, at age 82. Enough said! > >So ... you youngsters chomping at the bit to have your own organ bench >to sit upon ... have a little respect (grin)! > >Cheers, > >Bud > > >"> Paul F. Stapel, 607 773 1495, FAX 607 772 6501, Binghamton, NY Organist, Piano Instructor, Sales Director for WICKS Organ Company.    
(back) Subject: RE:Organist jobs From: jeffrey korns <jakorns@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 23:36:23 -0600   I have found the discussion about the "entrenched" little old lady organists very interesting. I cannot say that I have ever had difficulty finding an organist position in Iowa or Minnesota. I would however suggest to our 16 year old poster that he start off by being friendly with the organist in his own church. Don't expect to start off at the top. In fact, once you feel comfortable with playing the instrument before a congregation I would start off in a volunteer position until you are accomplished. Don't disparage the musical tastes of a congregation. Music is fluid (always changing). There has always been the "traditional" music and the "contemporary" music within the church (what do you think the "gospel" songs were considered when they were new?) A church organist is a servant - not only of his church but also of God. Maintain your humility and humor. Just when you think you are "hot stuff" you'll stand on the pedal board to reach some music on top of the console and forget that the crescendo pedal is wide open! If you aren't forgiving of others you'll have a hard time accepting the ribbing your choir will give you for the aforementioned disruption. You may not like a certain type of music, but realize that a certain hymn may have a special meaning to a parishoner - it was a hymn sung at the funeral of her spouse or child- keep your negative comments to a minimum. Be willing to accept unusual music and worship styles - I own two synthesizers and perform at my churches contemporary services as well. Realize that music did not cease to be written after the 18th century. Elevate the congregation but don't bore them! If you play the toccata from Boellman's Suite Gothic one week, give them Fred Bock's toccata arrangement of the contemporary song "We will glorify" the next (variety is the spice of life). Above all love the people you are ministering to and they will love you. Don't measure every thing you do by "am I being paid?" During my senior year in college I was a paid organist for a church and on occasion the pianist for the childrens Sunday School couldn't show up, I volunteered to play for the kids on the battered old piano and had lots of fun. I also talked to older members and found out their favorite hymns and tried to incorporate them into the services when practical. When I graduated from college and was preparing to move on, the church gave me a farewell party after my last service and many people gave me cards and monetary gifts to help me on my way (even though I was a paid staff member) it felt like a family not just a job. Love whatever you do! JAK sorry it's so long