PipeChat Digest #653 - Saturday, January 9, 1999
 
[Ballet] G & S in the Senate (fwd)
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
Re: [Ballet] G & S in the Senate (fwd)
  by "Roger Pariseau" <grinder@west.net>
 


(back) Subject: [Ballet] G & S in the Senate (fwd) From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 10:41:31 -0700 (MST)   Fellow listers:   Got this interesting observation in my e-mail today   From: AcoustiCDigest editors <acoustic_digest@yahoo.com>   > The question was asked whether Chief Justice Rehnquist's judicial robe, with the > gold stripes on the sleeves, is based on a G & S character. JulienGM stated > that according to the NEW YORKER magazine, the robe design is based on the Lord > Chancellor from IOLANTHE. > > At the beginning of the American judiciary, judges wore whatever robes they > wanted. There was a wide variety including everything from plain solid black to > crimson with gold trim and decorations. A consensus was soon developed on the > Supreme Court that plain black robes were more in keeping with the democratic > ideals of the new country. Judges of all other US courts (state and federal) > followed the example of the US Supreme Court and for the past 200 years or so, > all US judges have worn plain black robes without any decoration or indication > of the position of the particular judge. > > Then, on the opening day of the Supreme Court term a few years ago, Rehnquist > appeared on the bench wearing gold stripes on his sleeves. There was no > explanation and no advance notice. I don't know that he has ever given the > source of the design or the reason for the stripes. He has worn the gold stripes > on his sleeves ever since. You have to remember that Rehnquist was appointed to > the Supreme Court by Richard Nixon, the President that dressed the White House > guards in costumes covered with more gold braid than any self-respecting drum > major or Fifth Avenue doorman would ever think of wearing. (The White House > guard outfits were gone as soon as Nixon left the White House. If I'm not > mistaken, they were eventually sold as band uniforms.) >   == -editors ~ end AcoustiCDigest P.O.Box 16221 Tucson AZ 85732 E-zine ~ AcoustiCDigest On Line: http://AcoustiCD.com compact disc discounts, comparison shopping at http://mycdstore.com ------------------------------------------------------------------------ To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ compact disc discounts comparative shopping at:http://mycdstore.com and visit the Internet Music Index at http://acousticd.com    
(back) Subject: Re: [Ballet] G & S in the Senate (fwd) From: Roger Pariseau <grinder@west.net> Date: Fri, 08 Jan 1999 11:40:07 -0800   R A Campbell wrote:   > Got this interesting observation in my e-mail today > > From: AcoustiCDigest editors <acoustic_digest@yahoo.com> > The question was asked whether Chief Justice Rehnquist's > judicial robe, with the gold stripes on the sleeves, is > based on a G & S character. > > You have to remember that Rehnquist was appointed to the Supreme > Court by Richard Nixon, the President that dressed the White > House guards in costumes covered with more gold braid than any > self-respecting drum major or Fifth Avenue doorman would ever > think of wearing. (The White House guard outfits were gone as > soon as Nixon left the White House. If I'm not mistaken, they > were eventually sold as band uniforms.)   Well, let's see. Four stripes in the Army make a staff sergeant; in the Air Force, a technical sergeant; in the Navy/Coast Guard, a chief petty officer; and in the Marines, a gunnery sergeant. Seems noncommissioned status would be something of aa step down for such a highly-trained and positioned individual.   If the stripes were further down his sleeve and parallel to his robe's cuff, he might be a naval captain or an air force colonel. Higher up the chain, to be sure, but still "in the pit" so far as our guvmint's pecking order goes.   So, perhaps the stripes are semi-imitative of academia/preachers/ televangelists. But those folks typically restrict themselves to three fuzzy bars representing a doctorate in something or other.   Maybe Rhenquist is a "super" doctor of laws. (If you've ever read any of his opinions, you know it's surely not in logic!)   I give up. Will put HMS Pinafore on the VCR I just fixed to see if there's any inspiration there.   -- Roger