PipeChat Digest #662 - Monday, January 18, 1999
 
Tracker problems
  by "LAMAR BOULET" <lmar@hotmail.com>
Re: Tracker problems
  by "Nelson and Tracy Denton" <ndenton@cgocable.net>
Re: Happy Birthday Mr. Skinner!!
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Happy Birthday Mr. Skinner!!
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Organ Pipes for Sale
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Tracker problems From: "LAMAR BOULET" <lmar@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 08:52:29 PST   Over the past few months, this church, which has a tracker organ, has been under remodeling etc. In the past, this organ would give a lot of problems when the humidity got to it. I was successful in getting the church to keep the AC on 24 hrs a day. Most of the problems were taken care of by having the AC set so that temp would not go below the level of 60 degrees nor above 80 degrees. Humidity was checked. Well, since the remodeling job started, there has been no AC. The organ is a free standing cabinet and was covered with plastic sheeting in an attempt to keep dust out. Also the cabinet was painted during this time. When a request came to have it repaired, the cabinet doors would not close, they were so swelled from the moisture. New wiring was run to the blower motor, which is within the cabinet. Some electrician's arm bent and broke six pull downs while pulling electric wires thru the cabinet to the motor. These have been replaced, but two of these notes,which are in the great organ, now are partial ciphers on the high pitch stops. When 8' stops are pulled, the ciphers go a way.   Also several notes are now ciphering, partially, in the Swell.   When the organ is first turned on, there are many pallets partially open which close after a short time. Also when the organ is turned off, pallets open before wind pressure is gone and many pipes speak until the pressure is gone.   It is my assumption that the builder, which is not a main line company, used wood that was too dry for this area, The sliders get stuck and can hardly be pulled or pushed. Running the AC in the past has helped this problem some, but not completly.   I also service two old trackers,[Pilcher] in this area which do not have this kind of problems and these organs,[Pilcher] are over a hundred years old.   What to do? Replace compass springs?   This organ is stacked. That is, the great is above the Swell.   If you care to contact me I am at [ lmar@hotmail.com ] I am in South Louisiana. It does get humid here.   Thanks for listening Lamr Boulet   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker problems From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton@cgocable.net> Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 13:41:58 -0500   LAMAR BOULET wrote:   > Also several notes are now ciphering, partially, in the Swell. > > When the organ is first turned on, there are many pallets partially open > which close after a short time. Also when the organ is turned off, > pallets open before wind pressure is gone and many pipes speak until the > pressure is gone. > This is a sign that the pallet springs are not tight enough to hold the pallets closed or the linkages are a bit too short. Adjusting the springs by bending them slightly if they are soft or loosening off the leather or plastic nuts may also be needed. In either case do things gently as a minimal amount of adjustment can make a lot of change.   It's also possible that the pallet leathers are curling due to the humidity changes. The pallets may need to be softened by rubbing them to make them fit flush.   > It is my assumption that the builder, which is not a main line company, > used wood that was too dry for this area, The sliders get stuck and can > hardly be pulled or pushed. Running the AC in the past has helped this > problem some, but not completly.   This is probably the most common complaint against trackers ( other than their price) Trackers are affected by humidity far more than any other style of action and so extra care and skill is required to build them properly. Getting the AC back online would probably be your best bet to solve most of your problems. In the cooler months you may also need to have a de-humidifier added to help keep the humidity levels the same or add a humidifier if the church tends to dry out in the winter. Don't rely on those cheap humidistats that you buy in hardware stores as they are notoriously inaccurate.   Adding a lot more graphite/talc might help to free things up or the sliders may need to be thined a bit. This is a design fault as they should have been flexible enough to adjust for the humid conditions by now. Some builders have allowed for some movement in the wood by adding regulating screws to the top boards and flexable plastic seals and man-made materials to reduce this problem, ( with various results) but but any major adjustments will probably require disassembly of the chestwork which is more work than just a "service call".     > > I also service two old trackers,[Pilcher] in this area which do not have > this kind of problems and these organs,[Pilcher] are over a hundred > years old. > Back in the "good old days" organs were built over a much longer period of time than now. With the modern machinery and fast turnaround times required by modern needs, wood doesn't get a chance to acclimatize itself to it's surroundings. This leads to all sorts of problems when organs (or other wooden musical instuments) are moved from one climate to another in a matter of hours or days.   Another thing to remember is that only a handfull of Pilchers and other makes have survived the centuries! Most of the trackers from long ago are now all gone. Only the "best"? have survived, or the lucky ones.   I know of less than 6 organs in my own area ( Ontario Canada) that are trackers from the 19th century. When you consider that I have listings of hundreds of organs in this area built in the late 19th century (by very fine companies), to have only 6 or so left is a sign that despite the claims of "immortality" trackers don't always last forever.   > This organ is stacked. That is, the great is above the Swell.   That just probably means you will have to remove all the pipes to get in to service the Great chest. ( Be sure and leave yourself lots of time and money to do any repairs as you will find it will be an expensive time consuming job no matter what) > > If you care to contact me I am at [ lmar@hotmail.com ] > I am in South Louisiana. It does get humid here. > > Thanks for listening Lamr Boulet  
(back) Subject: Re: Happy Birthday Mr. Skinner!! From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 20:55:56 EST   In a message dated 99-01-15 15:32:51 EST, you write:   > Just for your knowledge, today January 15, 1999 is Ernest M. Skinner's   Yesterday was also the 50th birthday of the magnificent Aeolian-Skinner organ in the Mormon Tabernacle, an occasion duly observed with the 2nd American Classic Organ Symposium over this weekend that featured lectures, recitals, socializing and an all-around great time for the 200 or so who gathered in Salt Lake City.   I've just gotten in from the airport and could provide a more detailed account if anyone is interested. Might even get some photos downloaded by tomorrow with any luck.   David/Dudel  
(back) Subject: Re: Happy Birthday Mr. Skinner!! From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 20:17:42 -0600   >In a message dated 99-01-15 15:32:51 EST, you write: [SNIP] >I've just gotten in from the airport and could provide a more detailed account >if anyone is interested. Might even get some photos downloaded by tomorrow >with any luck. >   Please do provide a detailed account   Thanks   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Pipes for Sale From: Prestant16@aol.com Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 22:06:21 EST   List is at:   http://members.aol.com/prestant16/prof/pipes.htm