PipeChat Digest #667 - Saturday, January 23, 1999
 
Haskellizing bass pipes
  by "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
Nyquil
  by <George.Greene@rossnutrition.com>
Gawthrop date
  by "Robert  Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Re: Gawthrop date
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@bhsroe.k12.il.us>
Re: Nyquil
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Re: Haskell basses
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Haskell basses
  by "Dominic Joseph Radanovich" <rpob@aero.net>
Re: Haskell basses
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Haskell again....!
  by "Grahame Davis" <wineorg@azstarnet.com>
Re: Haskellizing bass pipes
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Nyquil
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Growing church question....
  by "mreeves@vzinet.com" <mreeves@vzinet.com>
 


(back) Subject: Haskellizing bass pipes From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jan 99 06:23:52 -0600   Greetings from snow covered Wisconsin:   There is a beautiful example of a 32' haskellized principal in the Aeolian Skinner organ in the Marcus Center of the Performing Arts. The stop fills the room with sound.   This instrument, given by the Miller Brewing Company, was revoiced and rescaled under the direction of Calvin Hampton and the Austin Organ Company several years ago.   The instrument, which is in excellent condition,is maintained by William Hansen and used frequently with the orchestra and other groups.   The 32' pipes were Haskellized for space reasons. The entire organ, approximately 50+ ranks, is located on a lift and is stored below the stage when not in use.  
(back) Subject: Nyquil From: George.Greene@rossnutrition.com Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:17:46 -0500     Bruce wrote...   <<... time to hit the Nyquil!>>   Your secret's out, Bruce! Now we know where the inspiration for some of your entertaining posts comes from! :) BTW, I played a C3 for several years, but was always afraid to try the "half-on" thing; I always feared that I might blow it up or something. (On second thought, maybe that wouldn't have been half bad...) My problem was that I would occasionally keep "start" on for too long (apparently until the tubes had warmed up) and would get a big BOOM through the speakers when I let it off.      
(back) Subject: Gawthrop date From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 08:56:27 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_01BE45E5.18B9A700 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Can anyone tell me in what year Daniel Gawthrop was born? I assume he is still alive.   Thanks   Robert Eversman Mineral Point WI ------=_NextPart_000_01BE45E5.18B9A700 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <html><head></head><BODY bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"><p><font size=3D2 = color=3D"#000000" face=3D"Arial">Can anyone tell me in what year Daniel = &nbsp;Gawthrop was born? &nbsp;I assume he is still = alive.<br><br>Thanks<br><br>Robert Eversman<br>Mineral Point WI</p> </font></body></html> ------=_NextPart_000_01BE45E5.18B9A700--    
(back) Subject: Re: Gawthrop date From: Gary Black <gblack@bhsroe.k12.il.us> Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:27:22 -0500   Robert, He was born in the year 157 B.C. Ha, Ha. I Think I'm losing it. Gary  
(back) Subject: Re: Nyquil From: Adrianne Schutt <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 15:18:27 -0800   At 09:17 AM 1/22/99 -0500, George.Greene@rossnutrition.com wrote: >BTW, I played a C3 for several years, >but was always afraid to try the "half-on" thing; I always feared that I >might blow it up or something. It'll take more than that to hurt a Hammond. :)   >My problem was that I would occasionally keep "start" >on for too long (apparently until the tubes had warmed up) and would get a >big BOOM through the speakers when I let it off. Hold the start switch for a count of 8, flip the run switch and hold for a count of 4, release the start switch. No fuss, no muss, no embarassing booms. Of course, if you *want* to see the congregation hanging from the lighting fixtures, disregard that start procedure. ;->   Have fun! Ad ;-> Co-Admin, The Hammond List    
(back) Subject: Re: Haskell basses From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 18:50:39 EST   In a message dated 99-01-21 16:02:48 EST, you write:   << why aren't they generally built today? Is it a matter of cost, or is building Haskell basses becoming a lost art? >> Actually there is not a lot of savings because there is almost the same amount of time and materials involved in building Haskell Bass pipes, and the haskell tubes DO affect the tone of all but the largest pipes.   There is a lot of traffic about experimenting with making haskell pipes out of regular pipes. ONE thing >IS< important about the tube.. It *must* be .707 the diamter of the prime tube regardless of the length, and the tube should not extend further into the pipe than about 1 diameter of the pipe above the upper lip or the pipe cannot work effectively.   just another 2 cents worth   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Haskell basses From: "Dominic Joseph Radanovich" <rpob@aero.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 19:04:00 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_0023_01BE4639.F8712F40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I installed the bass octave of a 16' Dulciana by Wicks. Very old = pipes. The bottom six are Haskelled to about 12' length. I got them = from Michael Proscia in Bowdon, Georgia several years ago. They are now = part of a unit 16' - 8' Gemshorn in the Choir organ at Underwood Baptist = Church in Milwaukee. (Total organ is 3/53). They are soft speaking = ,but do have a bit of a bite. I'm running them on 5" wp. They're real = nice when used in ensemble with the Dulciana 8' and Unda Maris, plus sub = and super couplers. Molto schmalzando! but I love it.   D J Radanovich, Milwaukee   ------=_NextPart_000_0023_01BE4639.F8712F40 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 = http-equiv=3DContent-Type> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>I installed the bass&nbsp; = octave of=20 a&nbsp; 16' Dulciana&nbsp; by Wicks.&nbsp; Very old pipes.&nbsp; The = bottom six=20 are Haskelled to about 12' length.&nbsp; I got them from Michael Proscia = in=20 Bowdon, Georgia several years ago.&nbsp; They are now part of a unit 16' = - 8'=20 Gemshorn in the Choir organ at Underwood Baptist Church in = Milwaukee.&nbsp;=20 (Total organ is 3/53).&nbsp; They are soft speaking ,but do have a bit = of a=20 bite.&nbsp; I'm running them on 5&quot; wp.&nbsp; They're real nice when = used in=20 ensemble with the Dulciana 8' and Unda Maris, plus sub and super = couplers.&nbsp;=20 Molto schmalzando!&nbsp; but I love it.</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>D J Radanovich,=20 Milwaukee</FONT></STRONG></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_0023_01BE4639.F8712F40--    
(back) Subject: Re: Haskell basses From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 20:39:18 EST   In a message dated 1/22/99 5:06:28 PM Pacific Standard Time, rpob@aero.net writes:   > I installed the bass octave of a 16' Dulciana by Wicks. Very old pipes. > The bottom six are Haskelled to about 12' length.   There is a 1958 Austin organ in the Presbyterian Church in Florence Alabama - I think it's a 2/18. Some excellent sounds in this instrument! There is one "wasted" rank. It is a 8' inaudible Dolce in the great (which already has a nice Gemshorn).   The Gemshorn is extended to 16' pitch with Haskelled pipes in the bass octave. This is as effective as any Gemshorn/Violone I have played. I think space saved is why they did it - no miters, just up and down. But they work.   I had a 8' Estey Aeoline Haskell bass at one time. The tallest pipe was only 5'. They do work!    
(back) Subject: Haskell again....! From: Grahame Davis <wineorg@azstarnet.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 20:06:38 -0800   Dear Friends....   Haskelled basses are being built nearly every year by the "main line" pipe makers and supply houses in this country.   I had two sets made a few years ago for a small house organ. They work beautifully on 2 1/2" wind pressure.   A.R.Schopp's Sons of Alliance Ohio make superb Haskelled pipes for a reasonable cost. We like their work the best.   There is a new Schantz here in Tucson which has a Haskelled 16' Pedal Violone. The pipes are well voiced and work splendidly.   I suspect that many other builders are using them.   Regards to all....Grahame Davis in Tucson Arizona    
(back) Subject: Re: Haskellizing bass pipes From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 23:02:05 -0500 (EST)   >Greetings from snow covered Wisconsin: Oh! Yea! rub it in... tub it in.... ;-)     >There is a beautiful example of a 32' > haskellized principal in the Aeolian Skinner > organ in the Marcus Center of the Performing > Arts. The stop fills the room with sound. >This instrument, given by the Miller Brewing > Company.... Wow! If the company gave the organ today, can you imagine what the stencilling on the facade would look like. Great big, skinny beer cans!! coooool! ;-)   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Nyquil From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 23:10:30 -0500 (EST)   Noooooooo! Dads odly bor bedizdal burbaziz!   ><<... time to hit the Nyquil!>> >Your secret's out, Bruce! Now we know where > the inspiration for some of your entertaining > posts comes from! :) It's the dawgs! ;-)   > BTW, I played a C3 for several years, but was > always afraid to try the "half-on" thing; I > always feared that I might blow it up or > something. Break a Hammond? Break a Hammond?? BREAK A HAMMOND??? hahahahahahaha I do remember those wonderful booms. Now that's one organ you don't turn off during the sermon! ;-)   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net    
(back) Subject: Growing church question.... From: mreeves@vzinet.com (mreeves@vzinet.com) Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 02:01:23 -0600   Hi, I'm new to this list and generally a long-term lurker. I've been on PipOrg-L, on and off, for about a year (it seems) and have enjoyed the knowledge shared there. But, I can't seem to contribute to the list without being chided for something. So, I'm here.   Also, know that I am far from being mechanically, or technically minded enough to understand the details of organ building, so please bare with me.   I'll try to be concise.   My question is for those of you whom have gone through church growth, and were employed there during building of new sanctuaries or expanding existing ones. What do you recommend, regarding our situation.   We are an old church, with a 2 manual, 21-rank, tracker pipe organ. The organ is 25 years old and produces adequate volume for our present Sanctuary.   We are planning the building of a new Sanctuary. One of my current tasks is to get a quote of the cost of dismantling the organ, moving it to the new Sanctuary, and then re-assembling it.   My concern is that the Tracker, as it is, will not produce ample volume for the size of the new Sanctuary, even though, the new Sanctuary will have livelier acoustics I have toyed with the idea of totally redesigning the organ, instead of reassembling the organ as it is, to install the pipes into the architecture (in Chambers) and going the Electro-pneumatic route, with a centralized console. Thus, providing plenty of room to add ranks as needed and as money allows. This would, in my heart, be disappointing to the organ builder, who still services the instrument. But, is this an affordable option?   Another option, is to redesign the tracker to where we can add a few more ranks.   Thirdly, to reassemble it as is, and amplify it electronically (mics, etc.).   What I definitely do not want to do, is lose the inherent value of the organ, it's meaning and significance to our congregation. Many tears and hardships went into the building of this instrument, and because of that, I'm hesitant to do anything at all.   I've built a site on the History of our organs. If you're interested in the complete history, go here http://www.angelfire.com/tx/FUMCMusicOrgan/index.html If you're just interested in our current Redman organ, go here http://www.angelfire.com/tx/FUMCMusicOrgan/organ1.html   Respectfully, and really needing some friendly advice.... +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Mark Reeves, Director of Music, Organist First United Methodist Church Canton, Texas +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ http://netministries.org/see/churches/ch02328 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++