PipeChat Digest #989 - Friday, July 16, 1999
 
Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc.
  by "Blaine Ricketts" <blaineri@home.com>
Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc.
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Reverb for multi-channel organs
  by <MickBerg@aol.com>
Re: decrepit Moller
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Birthday concert...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: synthetic substitutes for leather (was "Decrepit Mollers")
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Mason & Hamlin PIPE organs
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc. From: Blaine Ricketts <blaineri@home.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 13:07:05 -0700   I came across another problem with organs being used with pianos. Most pianos are stretch tuned and are only at A=3D440 in the middle = octave. Going up the scale they get sharper and down the scale flatter! Since pipe organs are not tuned this way, I had to get a piano tuner to "unstretch" the piano tuning for a recording session.   Blaine Ricketts  
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc. From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 14:16:10 -0700   I came across the same problem at MCC/SD, where the piano and organ were played together constantly. If the piano is only used for choir rehearsal = and for occasional duets with the organ (as it is at St. Matthew's), and practically never for a piano solo, what's the harm in unstretching the piano's tuning (since the organ is digital and is always gonna be "right = on" .... it doesn't have any kind of tuning adjustment)? At MCC/SD, I had the piano tech tune the piano to the organ NOTE for NOTE ... he wasn't very = happy about it, but at least the two instruments sounded in tune with each other when they were played together.   Cheers,   Bud   Blaine Ricketts wrote:   > I came across another problem with organs being used with pianos. > Most pianos are stretch tuned and are only at A=3D440 in the middle = octave. > Going up the scale they get sharper and down the scale flatter! > Since pipe organs are not tuned this way, I had to get a piano tuner to > "unstretch" the piano tuning for a recording session. > > Blaine Ricketts > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc. From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 15:07:39 -0700   At 01:07 PM 7/15/1999 -0700, you wrote:   >Most pianos are stretch tuned and are only at A=3D440 in the middle = octave. >Going up the scale they get sharper and down the scale flatter!   Many schools of thought consider "stretch tuning" of the piano to be a = vice. After laying the bearings, a good tuner should have no trouble "straight" tuning the octaves above and below. I like to do periodic interval checks (4th, 5th, flatted 7th, etc) both above and below, timing the beats, but make SURE the instrument is NOT "stretched". A study was done long ago of various professional tuners, and, even though they steadfastly insisted = they weren't doing it intentionally, almost all of their work was "stretched"! Other schools of thought think "stretching" a piano makes it more becoming to the ear, especially at the top end. Those that ascribe to such thought usually magnify the stretching even further. Pipe tuners, OTOH, never stretch, unless intentionally, due to the constant tones and ease of = hearing beats that the organ affords them.   Comments?   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Reverb for multi-channel organs From: MickBerg@aol.com Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 18:21:40 EDT   I'm sending this to the list because I cannot post it to "Charity" for = some reason. It's a description of how to hook up a reverb unit to a = multichannel electronic organ. It's very easy, and doesn't really need a schematic. Anyone who knows how = to use a soldering iron can do this. Connect a 150k-ohm resistor (1/4 watt is fine) from each positive speaker output to the input of the reverb unit. Omit the pedal flues channel. You don't need or want reverb on the deep bass, and it will cause overload of = the reverb's input. Connect all the negative speaker outputs to the negative = (or ground, or common, ) of the reverb unit's input. 150 k seems to work for 8-ohm amplifier output impedance, theoretically it would be 75 k-ohms for = a 4-ohm output impedance. You can use plain hookup wire (20-gauge) for the connections from the amp outputs to the resistors. Use a shielded wire = from the junction of the resistors to the reverb input. That's because the = signal is greatly attenuated from that point and it is at quite a high impedance. You must be sure that there is no problem with joining the grounds of all = the speaker outputs together. You CANNOT do this to an organ like the Saville that uses bridged or = floating amplifiers. You could damage things. If you plan to use a stereo reverb unit, just divide the channels between = the two sides in a thoughtful manner, i.e. four channels to the left side, = four channels to the right side. The reverb will have a better image that way. Good luck!  
(back) Subject: Re: decrepit Moller From: "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 07:57:34 -0400   >M=3DF6ller tubular organs are of two kinds. The later kind, made only >from >c. 1918-1920, was a tubular pitman instrument -- similar to a normal >electro-pneumatic M=3DF6ller, but with tubular primaries. These are >very >fine instruments and can be restored the same way as any other >M=3DF6ller. > >Unfortunately the majority of tubular M=3DF6llers, built in 1876-c.1915, >ar=3D >e >of the bar-and-membrane tubular type. To cut a long story short there >is a leather membrane which has to seal and in which the tension in >the >leather is critical. The weather inevitably causes the leather to >expand and contract, and bang goes the adjustment. Most people who >have >tried to restore one of these instruments have ended up with a >nightmare >of ciphers and dead notes. It might theoretically be possible to >restore one satisfactorily if one used totally stretch-proof >leather.=3D20   This organ has two types of chests. The Swell is based on an Estey chest with pouches and ventils. The Great chest has the bar type. Both chests have a 'pop' of the pitch when you release the key with no stops on. And tyhe Swell chest has started cyphering and drove me nuts all during the service with the cation channel bleeding though the Stopped Flute d' with a littl bit of whistle.   Well, I'm thinking of having a type of Universal Wind-Chest (not built by Austin) with Direct-Electric Action (possibly these will be built by Wicks, after seeing a Wicks yesterday that was in perfectlyh operating order after not being used for about a year and a half to two years, I'm starting to consider them). Also get the Swell and Great divisions on the same level with the addition of a Choir division and possibly a Solo box. (Yes, a four manual with an Echo.)   Well, thanks for shedding some more info my way.     Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ Organist/Choir Director | | 2/22 M.P. Moller pipe organ O ~20 member choir   ___________________________________________________________________ Get the Internet just the way you want it. Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month! Try Juno Web: http://dl.www.juno.com/dynoget/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Birthday concert... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 21:09:16 EDT   Greetings everyone,   sorry I haven't been posting much, but I've been busy. I've been reading everything about this "Disney Organ" and I must say, everyone =   seems to have a different opinion about it. Anyway, I'll be giving a = special concert tomorrow afternoon (as I do every year on my birthday) to raise money for the poor/homeless of Montreal. The concert will be at Mary Queen =   Of The World Cathedral. It's a very short programme:   Tocatta Brevis--->Daniel Gawthrop Humoresque--->Pietro Yon Toccata Giocoso--->William Mathias Sicilienne--->Gabriel Faur=E9 Tocatta--->Agustin Bari=E9   Tomorrow I turn the big '29'. Sometimes I feel 129! What a way =   to spend one's birthday; playing one of the most beautiful organs in Montreal.   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: synthetic substitutes for leather (was "Decrepit Mollers") From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 19:42:38 -0700   At 03:18 PM 7/14/1999 EDT, you wrote: >Dear Bud et al, At one time I worked for PErmacel tape and we made a = product >which was made out of silicone rubber. As you know, silicone rubberr is = the >stuff they make that 50 year caulk out of. I believe GE is the manufacturer.<snip>   While I'm sure to get a lot of poo-poos in my mailbox from this, I'd have = to vouch for this idea. I've used GE silicone compounds in many industrial, = as well as residential applications. The stuff just won't shrink, rot, disintegrate, or anything else. My mother's bathroom at her place has a = GE caulk job I did 30 years ago, and it still looks like new, and no = shrinking, either!   Maybe there's something to this...   DeserTBoB   ....awaiting some cheerfully burnin' thangs in mah mail from Broose...    
(back) Subject: Mason & Hamlin PIPE organs From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 21:06:57 -0700   I may have asked this before, but has anybody ever seen or heard a Mason & Hamlin PIPE organ? Don't think many were built ... the one I've heard of had chrome-plated METAL windchests (!) and brass fittings in the toeboards for the pipes ... I think the action was tubular pneumatic. Never got to hear it, unfortunately.   Cheers,   Bud