PipeChat Digest #991 - Saturday, July 17, 1999
 
Re: Louis Couperin
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: Birthday concert...
  by "Michael Davis" <MichaelDavis@wykecottage.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Louis Couperin
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Louis Couperin
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ"
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Louis Couperin
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Sign Off
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Louis Couperin
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
NICE PIPES FOR SALE!!
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Hilgreen-Lane chest magnets~~~~~technically oriented~~~
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
A bit of humor ...
  by <p.wilson2@juno.com>
Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc.
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ"
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Louis Couperin From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 06:32:27 -0400   Hi, Neil!   I happen to own a recently-released recording of the complete organ music= of Louis Couperin. To my ear, the recording is not terribly satisfactory, a= s it's played on a period instrument tuned in a very bizarre unequal temperament, and it sounds frankly extremely out of tune. But, that's neither here nor there. The informational leaflet which came with the recording is full of good information, and I'd be happy to send you a photocopy upon receipt of your snail mail address. You might mention whether you read French. The leaflet is bilingual, but the English versi= on is not as good as the original French version. As another commentor poin= ted out, Louis died quite young, which is undoubtedly why he is not better kn= own than his more illustrious relative, Fran=E7ois. His music is, however, first-rate.   Best,   Dave     -----Original Message----- From: N Brown <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org>; anglican-music@dragon.= com <anglican-music@dragon.com>; PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU <PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU> Date: Friday, July 16, 1999 11:32 PM Subject: Louis Couperin     Friends, for my Sept. 11 concert, I plan to play a Fantaisie and Duo by Louis Couperin. Problem: I need some info on him. The Grout Book (my old trusty crusty one) doesn't list him, and the info I found on the web is very scant (no dates or anything). I know he was Francois' uncle, but that is about it.   Any help will be appreciated. --Neil Brown, AAGO, MMus Barnegat, NJ USA     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Birthday concert... From: "Michael Davis" <MichaelDavis@wykecottage.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 09:07:08 +0100   Happy Birthday Carlo and good luck - wish I could be there best wishes Michael     ----- Original Message ----- From: Carlo Pietroniro <concert_organist@hotmail.com> To: <churchorganist@onelist.com>; <organchat@onelist.com>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: 16 July 1999 02:09 Subject: Birthday concert...     > Greetings everyone, > > sorry I haven't been posting much, but I've been busy. I've > been reading everything about this "Disney Organ" and I must say, = everyone > seems to have a different opinion about it. Anyway, I'll be giving a special > concert tomorrow afternoon (as I do every year on my birthday) to raise > money for the poor/homeless of Montreal. The concert will be at Mary = Queen > Of The World Cathedral. It's a very short programme: > > Tocatta Brevis--->Daniel Gawthrop > Humoresque--->Pietro Yon > Toccata Giocoso--->William Mathias > Sicilienne--->Gabriel Faur=E9 > Tocatta--->Agustin Bari=E9 > > Tomorrow I turn the big '29'. Sometimes I feel 129! What a = way > to spend one's birthday; playing one of the most beautiful organs in > Montreal. > > Carlo > > > ______________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Louis Couperin From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 10:21:09 -0400 (EDT)   dave, is your recording "l'oeuvre d' orgue" , davitt maroney, on the boizard???   I have this and was disappointed that the playing did not sound clean and the registrations were muddy sounding. This music did not seem particularly interesting to me in that it appeared to lack direction. In addition, maroney did not appear to use the temperament to enhance the music, but rather seemed to just plow on through without much feeling for what the music was trying to do. All in all, i'm pretty disappointed with the 2-disc set, except for the tuning of the organ.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Cowardly dogs bark loudest. -- John Webster    
(back) Subject: Re: Louis Couperin From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 10:24:07 -0400 (EDT)   Not to harp..... but as I continue to listen to this cd I also get the feeling that the microphone placement was too close to the organ, as the divisional balance seems off, especially noted in the contrast between the trompette and the cornet.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Cowardly dogs bark loudest. -- John Webster    
(back) Subject: Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ" From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 13:54:50 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/99 3:24:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, sn@beer.com writes:   << > The cover article of the July 12 issue of Christianity Today is = entitled > "Triumph of the Praise Songs How guitars beat out the organ in the > worship wars". >> Obviously, whoever the idiot is that wrote THAT article was having a bad = acid trip or something similar when oit was wrotten. How SAD...............  
(back) Subject: Re: Louis Couperin From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 15:12:11 -0700   >Friends, for my Sept. 11 concert, I plan to play a Fantaisie and Duo by >Louis Couperin. Problem: I need some info on him. The Grout Book (my >old trusty crusty one) doesn't list him, and the info I found on the web >is very scant (no dates or anything). I know he was Francois' uncle, >but that is about it. > >Any help will be appreciated. >--Neil Brown, AAGO, MMus >Barnegat, NJ USA   Translated from _Guide de la musique d'orgue_, ed. Gilles Cantagrel:   "Born in Chaumes-en-Brie around 1626; died in Paris, Aug. 29, 1661. Harpsichordist, organist, and violist. Louis is the first notable representative of a famous dynasty of musicians whose name was to be connected, from 1653 to 1826, to the organ of Saint-Gervais. He was the first titular organist there; he was succeeded by Charles Couperin (1638-1679) (after an interim held by Lalande), after which date the organ passed into the hands of his cousin Nicolas Couperin (1680-1748), then to the latter's son. Armand Louis Couperin (1727-1789), very famous in his time, and finally to Gervais Francois Couperin (1759-1826), his son. Louis Couperin moved to Paris by August 1651. On April 9, 1653, he thus became the titular organist of Saint-Gervais and, around the same time, was named first violist [dessus de viole: this may simply mean that he played the upper viola part] of the King's Chamber. In 1659, he followed the court to Saint-Jean-de-Luz for the marriage negotiations for Louis XIV with the infanta Marie-Therese and, along the way, stopped at Toulouse. His works by today's count comprise more than 200 pieces which were not published in his lifetime. They have survived the centuries thanks to three manuscipts called the Bauyn d'Angevilliers (Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris), the Parville (Berkeley, U.S.), and the Oldham (private collection, Great Britian). There are 130 pieces for the harpsichord, 70 for the organ, as well as several symphonies and fantasies for violas and oboes. "At a time when musical style was inexorably changing, Francois 'le Grand' Couperin rendered a fine homage to his uncle Louis by proclaiming in 1713 that the works of his ancestors 'were of those of composers who still had exquisite taste.' Louis Couperin died the same year as Mazarin, the year of Louis XIV's personal assumption of power, of the rise of Colbert, and of Giovanni Battista Lulli's becoming a Frenchman--in a word, the beginning of the 'French classical era.' Couperin, freshly arrived from the provinces, had only ten years in the capital for his genius to blossom, and his personal destiny corresponds to the most baroque period of French art. When domestic tranquillity was restored after the troubles of the Fronde, Mazarin, the Italian minister, attempted a second offensive in favor of Italian opera. Louis Couperin could participate only as a violist in the sumptious _Cercole amante_ of Cavailli (1662), but he could profit from the _Xerse_ of the Venitian performed in 1660 for the marriage of Louis XIV. Couperin's years at court correspond as well to the apogee of the court ballet under the merciless baton of Lulli, who still delighted in occasionally drawing upon his Italian muse. Some time before, the singer Pierre de Nyert and the violist Andr=E9 Maugars came back full of enthusiasm from their stays in Italy, and the painters Poussin and Claude Lorrain had taken up lodgings at court [translator's note: that is, after their Italian sojourns). Never had the fusion been so strong between the two Latin sisters (translator's note: I don't know whether this means Italian and French art or Italian painting and Italian musical composition), and even if this cohabitation didn't go without some pouting, at least there were no fisticuffs! "If the court marveled at the sight of the Italians' machinery (translator's note: I think that elaborate stage machinery for Italian operas is meant) yet yawned while listening to their _parlar cantando_, no one took their harpsichord style seriously until the day in 1652 when the German Froberger arrived in the capital, imbued with the precepts and examples of his master Frescobaldi, the organist at Saint Peter's in Rome. Louis Couperin, Roberday, D'Anglebert, together with the lutenists Gaultier, Du Fault, and Blancrocher, seem to have formed around this German a circle comparable to the Florentine _camerate_. This is attested to by the _Prelude in Imitation of Monsieur Froberger_ of Louis Couperin and the two _Tombeaux_ in memory of Blancrocher written by Couperin and Froberger. "It was a rhetorical era: the poetry of the "pr=E9cieux" found its prolongation in the atmosphere at court, and instrumental music itself, not without some mannerisms, held its own with the discourses 'in prose' of its 'non-measured' preludes and its r=E9cits d'orgue, or its danses 'in verse'--= a discourse understood by an elite impregnated with the choreographed airs of court ballets and the art of the coded gesture. "Louis Couperin listened, assimilitated, reunited and... demurred. Before his nephew Francois, he married tastes and styles, even if only in playing keyboards and the viola; but if this plurality enriched his art, he took care not to confuse the respective idioms of each instrument. He spared himself from loading (at least by writing) his organ work with any ornamentation and, when he did borrow from the viola, it was to create a new organ style that promised a rich future. "The organ was then enjoying a blossoming without parallel, and Norbert Dufourcq has counted no less than forty organ builders active in =46rance under the Regency [of Louis XIV]... "For a long time, it was believed that, pure poet of the harpsichord and disciple of Chambonni=E8res, Couperin never thought of endowing the pipe organ with any literature of its own. Organists borrowed, not without success, some allemandes, sarabandes, chaconnes en rondeau, and symphonies (it being understood that the organ can exploit any page of polyphony and enrich itself with a repertoire not specific to the instrument) and, with still more reason, some pieces on the second tone (c minor), in particular a duo in the style of a fugued gigue, ending in binary rhythm, and a grand passacaille in the Italian style with 39 variations. They added two authentic pieces for organ: the _Carillon de Paris_, which was evidently played each year at Saint-Gervais for All Saints', and a fantasy whose bass melody calls for the trumpet stop. Thus served, Couperin dazzled by his pure musical genius and a language of a very singular savor, but, as an organist, he was relegated with those of his contemporaries of whom few works are known, like Pierre and Joseph de La Barre, organists of the king, Etienne Richard, organist at several Parisian parishes and attached to various members of the royal family, Henri DuMont, organist at Saint-Paul and of Queen Marie-Therese (and assistant master of the royal chapel), as well as the anonymous authors of manscript books such as the one at the Sainte-Genevieve Library. "But since 1960, the musical world knows that the organist of Saint-Gervais [i.e., Louis Couperin] left a manuscript regrouping a suite for harpsichord and pieces for oboe, and seventy pieces specifically for the organ, dating from 1650 to 1659. Though he has not published his precious discovery, Guy Oldham, its fortunate possessor, has revealed its contents and authorized the recording of a panorama of representative selections. "The internal division seems to reveal two "Organ Books" (pieces 1-45, 46-70). One finds 23 fantasies or fugues, 6 basses de trompette (called fantasies), 2 duos, 27 plain-chant commentaries. The work of Louis Couperin constitutes the missing link between the polyphonic pieces of Titelouze, Racquet and Roberday, and the immense corpus of the age of Louis XIV. This painter-musician, in love with the most accidental [in the musical sense] harmonic colors (F sharp minor), the most abrupt of _durezze_ offered by the ambiguity of a modality just ending and a tonality just being born, vibrates with the prism of colors and timbres.... "For the first time in France, Louis Couperin indicates some registrations: '_Urbs beata Jerusalem_ on the upper manual against the right thumb or in trio' (first appearance of fingering for the organ in =46rance...).... Before his time, Louis Couperin makes his own La Fontaine'= s motto of 'nothing in excess.' His baroque and italianate musical language flows in classical and French proportions...." [Commenting on his "solos de basse":] "On the organ, Louis Couperin first sets up the polyphonic backdrop in imitation on the gentler stops. A coup de theatre: the last entry is intoned by the sonorous voix of the basse de trompette. At the appearance of this _primo uomo_ [first man], the supernumeraries [les comparses] fall back in discreet harmonies which insidiously play off each through retards. The soloist's loquaciousness increases as he speaks. The most unpredictable rhythms, the most disconterting harmonic surprises, increasingly distant intervals (more than three octaves) are all so many rhetorical figures of an orator sure of his eloquence and able to wield with equal power of persuasion the noble declaration (no. 12) and the jest in the style of a canzona (no. 68). "Be assured, the successors of Louis Couperin did indeed hear that voice and they understood what it was saying! It remains to be wished that today's musicians be no longer deprived of this message that it would be an abuse to continue to keep under lock and key."   I presume he is referring to the fact that (at least as of the time of his writing) the Oldham manuscipt had not been published. Is it still?   R. Runyon      
(back) Subject: Sign Off From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 20:29:27 +0100   Dear List,   For the next two weeks I will be away, the first at the Oundle International Organ Festival (masterclasses from famous organists) and the second week I will be singing in Poitiers, France with my church choir. I will get to play the famous Cliquot organ of Poitiers Cathedral. I will = fill you all in when I return, but for now I sign off,   Yours,   Richard Pinel.    
(back) Subject: Re: Louis Couperin From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 16:00:54 -0400   Yeah, Bruce, one and the same. Not being awfully familiar with the early temperaments, it was hard for me to tell whether it was the temperament I disliked, or the playing. But, dislike it I did, whatever the reason. I figure if I cannot warm to a temperament like this when it's used for = music which was composed with it in mind, there's little chance I will ever = learn to like it. The CD is gathering dust on my shelf, and one day my son will inherit it and and have to figure out what to do with the damned thing! Having paid around $30 for it, there's NO chance I'll just throw it away!   Best,   Dave     -----Original Message----- From: bruce cornely <rohrschok8@webtv.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Saturday, July 17, 1999 10:22 AM Subject: Re: Louis Couperin     dave, is your recording "l'oeuvre d' orgue" , davitt maroney, on the boizard???   I have this and was disappointed that the playing did not sound clean and the registrations were muddy sounding. This music did not seem particularly interesting to me in that it appeared to lack direction. In addition, maroney did not appear to use the temperament to enhance the music, but rather seemed to just plow on through without much feeling for what the music was trying to do. All in all, i'm pretty disappointed with the 2-disc set, except for the tuning of the organ.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Cowardly dogs bark loudest. -- John Webster     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: NICE PIPES FOR SALE!! From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 17:07:00 -0500   For Sale:   M=F6LLER 8' VIOLIN DIAPASON 1-12 W/12-NOTE KILGEN CHEST:   1) M=F6ller 8' Violin Diapason notes 1-12; good cond. 4 pipes mitered to approx. 9'. A few tuning scrolls missing, otherwise in great chape. Speaks on 3"-4" wind. 2) Kilgen 12-note offset; matches M=F6ller Violin Diapason 8'. Never attached and tested this chest, but bought it under the terms it is in "plug and play" condition.   Pipes: $150 Chest: $150 -or- All: $250   Buyer to pay shipping in long distance circumstances -or- I can deliver within a $350 mile driving radius for an additional fee. Of course, you're always welcomed to come and get them in person as well. ;-)   Any interested parties please e-mail me privately; I am not reading my PipeChat mail right now.   Kevin Cartwright Owner, Wicks Op.# 1585 Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com    
(back) Subject: Hilgreen-Lane chest magnets~~~~~technically oriented~~~ From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 18:41:54 EDT   Hello all you techie types out there----- I am in need of a half dozen (6)Hilgreen-Lane chest magnets of the *horseshoe* type as used in the H-L action in the early teens. This style = of magnet has a brass bottom-piece and the electromagnet itself is shaped = more like a horseshoe than a *U*, and is similar to an early Austin = electromagnet in shape. If anyone knows the whereabouts of 6 of these magnets, please E-mail me~~~privately please. Thanks much,,, ---Roc  
(back) Subject: A bit of humor ... From: p.wilson2@juno.com Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 18:42:45 -0700   Definitely not organ-related, but I'm sure many will relate in other ways.   --------- Forwarded message ---------- From: MsKitty <MsKitty@katscratch.com> To: Kitty's Daily Mews <kittysdailymews@topica.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 17:07:11 -0700 Subject: >^,,^< Kitty's Daily Mews >^,,^< 7/17/99   >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^<     Electronic Parish   You know your parish has gone over the electronic communications edge when:   - The pastor reads his sermon from a palm-held computer "notepad"   - There are cell-phone chargers next to the pew-pencil drill holes   - MCI takes out full-page ads in the parish bulletin   - At the parish flea market, used cell phones and answering machines outnumber bowling balls, blenders and electric can-openers.   - When the bells are rung following the consecration, half the congregation reaches into pockets or purses to see if it was for them. (Theologically speaking, of course, it was.)   - The parish not only has an Internet web site, the parish council has discussed petitioning the bishop to change the parish name to "All Saints Domain"   - Everyone in the parish assumes everyone knows what "domain" means   - People without email addresses are known as "the needy"   - As an April Fool's Day joke on the pastor, several of the teenagers hid their pagers around his office, then called them all simultaneously. Apparently it did not startle him. He said he felt like he was at Sunday liturgy.   - During coffee and doughnuts after Mass, people are overheard wondering if confession by email would be "licit." Someone thinks "licit" is the name of a new software company.   - A petition is circulating to partition the crying room, creating a "beepers-on" section.   - To quiet fussy 2-year-olds, handing them pagers on "vibrate" is more common than handing them Cheerios.   - Five-year-olds actually do say "deliver us some email" during the Our Father rather than "deliver us from evil."   "It's getting so bad," I said to my colleague, "that pretty soon if you forget your contribution envelope, there'll be one of those credit card slides in your pew so you can charge it."   "You mean your parish still uses envelopes?" he asked.   >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^<     =A9 1999 All rights reserved worldwide       _____________________________________________________________________ What's Your Topica? Find It Now. http://www.topica.com/t/2   ___________________________________________________________________ Get the Internet just the way you want it. Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month! Try Juno Web: http://dl.www.juno.com/dynoget/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning of organs/pianos etc. From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 22:30:32 -0400 (EDT)   Folks, I don't know why all these posts of mine appeared today--when they were sent way back in the week. Oh well. Peace to you all. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ" From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 17 Jul 1999 23:17:44 -0400 (EDT)   Scott, I don't think you read the article, did you? The title is not at all what the article is about. --Neil