PipeChat Digest #993 - Monday, July 19, 1999
 
Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ"
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Pendulum swinging back to the middle
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ"
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Pendulum swinging back to the middle
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Tuning, Humidity, etc.
  by <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Ocean Grove Festival
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Pendulum swinging back to the middle
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ" From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sun, 18 Jul 1999 09:49:00 EDT   In a message dated 7/17/99 11:19:36 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Innkawgneeto@webtv.net writes:   << I don't think you read the article, did you? The title is not at all what the article is about. >>   Yes I did- but to even entitle something like that is very dangerous and poisonous to the church music world- especially to those of us who ARE in traditional parishes that value their organs and choirs.  
(back) Subject: Pendulum swinging back to the middle From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Sun, 18 Jul 1999 14:09:00 -0700     Thought you'd find this interesting:   Pendulum of worship practices swinging more to middle, leaders told July 13, 1999   By Tom McAnally*   NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UMNS) - The pendulum of worship practices has swung to = an extreme in recent years but is now beginning to return to a more middle position, a professor of church music told several hundred worship = leaders.   The issue of what kind of music to use in worship is not a new one, according to John Ferguson, a teacher, performer and leader of congregational singing. He spoke July 11 to the nearly 600 participants attending the biennial convocation of the Fellowship of United Methodists = in Music and Worship Arts.   "In church music, just like in a healthy diet, a little bit of sugar goes = a long, long way," he said.   Ferguson, professor of organ and church music at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn., spoke on worship in the 21st century to the entire assembly at West End United Methodist Church in Nashville. He also led = organ classes and directed a hymn festival, which closed the July 8-13 event.   While supporting a broader range of styles of congregational and choral = song at worship, Ferguson said he favors "blended" worship but dislikes the = term. "It makes me think of a blender (where) everything you put together ... becomes one sort of gooey mass."   A wide variety of styles can coexist comfortably in the same worship service, he said, provided their reason for being included is thematically or liturgically justified.   "I don't favor sticking one of every style in every service as a kind of liturgical tokenism," he said. "Just because all kinds of food are offered at a buffet doesn't mean that all should be on the same plate at the same time." He likened the practice to serving potato chips at a Thanksgiving dinner or baked Alaska with hot dogs.   Even though blending music and worship styles is difficult, Ferguson said = he prefers it to offering a range of styles of worship in a given = congregation. "Widely differing styles probably means that we no longer have one congregation, one church, but a variety of churches under one roof, " he said.   He recommends that each congregation struggle to determine "who and what = it is and then have the courage to offer worship that reflects its identity - worship with integrity that is still welcoming."   The burden for blending usually falls upon the church musician, Ferguson said, because music styles are at the core of the "worship wars" in = mainline Protestant congregations.   Ferguson supports the increased use of a variety of musical instruments = in worship but isn't ready to eliminate the organ.   "I am convinced that the pipe organ remains the ideal, single instrument from which one person can lead and accompany the greatest variety of = styles of congregational song," he said. "The organ provides a greater variety of quantity of sound controllable by a single person than any other acoustic instrument.   "I am optimistic about our future if only because God's people have always felt the need to worship and have always sung at worship," he said. "Thus, one way or another, God's people will want and need the ministry of committed, skilled church musicians."   The fellowship's members include volunteers and professional staff who = have responsibility for the worship life of the church. In an interview with United Methodist News Service, Dan Francabandiero of Jacksonville, Fla., = the new president of the 2,200-member organization, said contemporary worship = is still an evolving issue for the church and the fellowship because "it = means something different to everyone."   The real challenge underlying the discussion and debate is how to attract young adults into the life of the church, he said.   Brad Kisner, just completing six years on the fellowship's governing council, said tension among the organization's members about worship and music styles is not as great as it once was.   "Changing styles in worship is certainly a major issue, but more of us are acknowledging that is OK to worship differently," he said. "People can worship in contemporary or traditional styles and not look down on each other." The real challenge for the music and worship leaders, he added, is to meet the diverse needs of people in the congregation.   Kisner, director of music and fine arts at First United Methodist Church = in Corpus Christi, Texas, served two years on the fellowship council as president-elect, two as president, and two as past president. Just completing a two-year term as president is the Rev. Fred Lewis, Clear = Lake, Iowa.   "We live in an exciting time," Kisner told UMNS. "There are new possibilities. We don't have to use just the organ." But new options can = be scary, he noted. "We must learn new technologies and see how they can best work for us all."   The Rev. Tex Sample, recently retired from the faculty of United Methodist-related Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas City, Mo., = focused his address and workshop sessions on the difficulty of planning worship = for generations that experience life differently in significant ways. The older, literate generation depends on meaning and words, he said, while = the under-50 group is much more attuned to experience and aesthetics.   Sample expressed concern that many congregations do not touch people's passion. This passion or desire, he said, is structured not like a = language but with perceptual memories.   When asked how music and worship leaders can get older members to provide for a different approach to worship, Sample urged an "add on" rather than "replacement" approach, giving full attention to the variety of ways = people practice worship. "People are profoundly shaped by practices," he said. He also suggested appealing to the older people to give permission for the church to reach out to their children and grandchildren, many of whom are unrelated to the church.   During a public worship service at Nashville's historic Downtown Presbyterian Church, Sample stressed the importance of "practicing" the faith and worship. He challenged the idea that an individual can hold an ultimate belief apart from the practice of it. "Without practice you will never know, feel (or) be profoundly committed to anything," he declared.   For example, he said, "God transforms us in the practice of praying for = our enemies." Sample also mused about what kind of a culture he would be = living in today if all the churches were teaching the "practices of nonviolence."   "We worship a God who calls us to the practice of faithfulness and meets = us there and transforms us," he said. "To practice hope is to put yourself in = a place that you would not be if you did not believe in the promises of = God."   Chairwoman of the committee that planned the convocation was Debi Tyree, music editor at Abingdon Press, an imprint of the United Methodist Publishing House in Nashville.   # # #   *McAnally is director of United Methodist News Service, headquartered in Nashville, Tenn., with offices in New York and Washington.   ***************   United Methodist News Service (615)742-5470 Releases and photos also available at http://www.umc.org/umns/     R. Runyon      
(back) Subject: Re: Article: "How guitars beat out the organ" From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 18 Jul 1999 15:59:57 -0400 (EDT)     >... to even entitle something like that is very > dangerous and poisonous to the church > music world- especially to those of us who > ARE in traditional parishes that value their > organs and choirs. In defense of Christianity Today, we must remember the purpose of a title or headline -- to catch the eye, get attention, and snag the reader. Had the title actually indicated the content of the article, some of "us" would have read it possibly for reinforcement. Many of those in the CCM camp would not have bothered. However, because of the title I would venture to say that many CCM people read the article to gloat and reinforce their success. If a title does not elicit some controversy, it is not doing its work. Much as I find the title depressing and distasteful, and can see how it could be used to promote the demise of traditional music, I think it probably managed to get more people to read it that a more "honest" title might have.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Cowardly dogs bark loudest. -- John Webster    
(back) Subject: Re: Pendulum swinging back to the middle From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 18 Jul 1999 16:08:40 -0400 (EDT)   Wow! Thanks for the report. It is very encouraging. About five years ago I was in a Methodist where the minister was hell-bent on "going to tape". I read a workshop description a few weeks ago that was positively scary in its approach to worship. There is light at the end of the tunnel, and it does not appear to be a train! ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Cowardly dogs bark loudest. -- John Webster    
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning, Humidity, etc. From: dougcampbell@juno.com Date: Sun, 18 Jul 1999 18:07:00 -0400       On Tue, 13 Jul 1999 09:12:51 -0400 George.Greene@rossnutrition.com writes: > >I realize that this post is not "organic", but some of us play in >churches that >use organ and piano together on congregational hymns, so "inquiring >minds want >to know..." Over the past few years, I have noticed a device that >appears to >be a humidifier attached to pianos in churches. There is usually a >telltale >piece of what appears to be Tygon tubing, through which the device is >filled >with water, along with a red light, which apparently indicates when it >needs to >be refilled. In light of our recent discussions, is the humidifier >supposed to >help keep the piano in tune? > >It seems strange to have a humidifier attached to a church piano when >so many >of them have been equipped with "Damp Chasers", small electric heating >elements >which are supposed to keep the action dry to prevent keys from >sticking. >(Actually it seems strange to have a container of water anywhere near >a >piano!) > Humidifiers in the winter - damp chasers in the summer !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   ___________________________________________________________________ Get the Internet just the way you want it. Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month! Try Juno Web: http://dl.www.juno.com/dynoget/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Ocean Grove Festival From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Mon, 19 Jul 1999 00:17:28 -0400 (EDT)   Greetings Friends! I just got home from the Choir Festival at the Great Auditorium in Ocean Grove, NJ, home of the 150+ rank Hope-Jones organ. It was a very warm night, but not intollerable. The breezes did stir the air in the cavernous room. 1,482 singers sang to more than 4,500 in the audience, along with a top-notch bell choir, excellent brass group, 10 directors, and of course, Gordon Turk at the organ. I brought 15 singers from my church. As usual, I did not sing, but chose to experience both the rehearsal and the performance from out in the room. I'm glad I did,as it was the first time I heard the "antiphonal" trumpets coming from a chamber in the ceiling I had not seen before. 2 of the pieces were forgettable, but all the others were really performed nicely. The anthems were centered around the theme: "Jesus is Lord and King." The "finale" of the program was Wilhousky's arr. of "Battle Hymn of the Republic," complete with the lighting of the very large American Flag front and center (controlled by a stop on the organ). I had expected that to be tacky, but it really was an uplifting touch. Have a great week!! --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Pendulum swinging back to the middle From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Mon, 19 Jul 1999 00:36:07 -0400 (EDT)   Absolutely Bruce. Congregants are getting FED UP with canned music, trivial music, unsubstantive music, no hymnbooks, yada yada. Balance is the key, always has been, for a truly successful music program. "Pendulum swing like a pendulum do." --Neil