PipeChat Digest #995 - Wednesday, July 21, 1999
 
certain composers...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Guitars & Organs
  by "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com>
Re: certain composers...
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Give 'em what they want (was "Guitars and Organs")
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Guitars & Organs-baroque
  by <JKVDP@aol.com>
2/7 Wurlitzer for sale
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: Give 'em what they want (was "Guitars and Organs")
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@worldnet.att.net>
Re: subbing
  by "Tim Rand" <tim@minn.net>
Re: Give 'em what they want (was "Guitars and Organs")
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
(No subject)
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: (No subject)
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: certain composers... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 05:05:54 EDT   Greetings,   the following is a short list of composers whose library of =   organ music seems hard to locate. Can anyone please tell me if they've written anything other than their most well-known compositions. Thanks.   Lynnwood Farnam (other than tocatta on "o sons and daughters") Marcel Lanquetuit (other than tocatta in D major) Michelle Leclerc (other than tocatta in C major) John Weaver (other than tocatta in G major) Percy E. Fletcher (other than Fountain Reverie and Festival Tocatta)   Carlo       ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Guitars & Organs From: "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 11:18:12 EDT   I have to agree with several members of the list, mostly uninspiring = playing and to a lesser degree uninspiring organs have led to the decline of organ =   music and the surgence of guitars.   Granted for the most part in this area of the country, the guitarists are also uninspiring and lack but the most basic degree of talent (3 chord people). We also have a bumper crop of 3 chord organists who can not even =   play a hymn out of a standard hymnal with out transposing and writing in chord symbols for playing them. This usually results in the standard repitory of 30 hymns over and over again - always played badly. I have also heard very uppity organist with degrees up the wazoo taking a very scholarly approach to service playing - "Now only use the Great 8 4 2 =   and Mixture to play hymns nothing else - and God forbid don't play = anything other than what is "written" on the page. I ask you this - how boring = could this possibly be? No wonder some churhes have gotten electronic hymn devices - at lease these change registrations between verses! The KEY is MUSICAL playing - we are playing HYMNS, as Luther put it, "The music and words of God combined into one". The Hymn in meant to inspire = and uplift - NOT educate on the baroque practice of organ registration - the congregation could care less! They want to be MOVED and many GOOD = organists know how to do this! We don't need to give up on our musical morals nor de we need to become musical whores playing 'what ever they ask for'. We do however have a responsibility dictated by our positions to provide musical, spiritual and =   thought provoking music to our congregations.     _______________________________________________________________ Get Free Email and Do More On The Web. Visit http://www.msn.com  
(back) Subject: Re: certain composers... From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 11:58:32 -0700   >Greetings, > > the following is a short list of composers whose library = of >organ music seems hard to locate. Can anyone please tell me if they've >written anything other than their most well-known compositions. Thanks. > >Lynnwood Farnam (other than tocatta on "o sons and daughters") >Marcel Lanquetuit (other than tocatta in D major) >Michelle Leclerc (other than tocatta in C major) >John Weaver (other than tocatta in G major) >Percy E. Fletcher (other than Fountain Reverie and Festival Tocatta) > >Carlo > > John Weaver has also published a Prelude and Fugue in E Minor and Passacaglia on a Theme by Dunstable, both from Boosey and Hawkes. The Passacaglia is a delightful work based on the well-known Agincourt Hymn, a dazzler for recitals.   By the way, I think it's spelled "toccata".   R. Runyon      
(back) Subject: Give 'em what they want (was "Guitars and Organs") From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 10:22:05 -0700   My repertoire has made a quantum shift since I came to St. Matthew's ... = after a few months, I found the service austere in the extreme (read "downright boring"), reflecting the Rector's penchant for penance and austerity, etc. = The congregation tolerated it, but congregational participation was virtually = nil, except in the old Scottish Chant Gloria in excelsis ... they mumbled the = hymns and the rest of the Ordinary, if they bothered at all. The Rector rang the changes on the few hymns he knew, year in and year out.   Part of it had to do with my predecessor, a non-Anglican rock keyboardist, = who was TERRIFIED of playing above a mezzo-piano, even on Easter (according to = the choir) ... strange for a rock keyboardist, but there you have it. And part = of it had to do with sheer boredom at the very small repertoire.   Little by little I got the Rector to open up the hymn list ... this is an elderly congregation who dearly loves the Victorian Anglican hymns of = their childhood ... and I started accompanying the Willan and Merbecke Masses in = such a way that they could follow them and sing them. I put away Missa Marialis = (for the time being, anyway) ... in that dead room, it sounded like the moaning = of the damned (grin).   I try to alternate between standard anthems and anthems of the Victorian = period, but we rely pretty heavily on the Victorian repertoire ... the choir sings = it well, and the congregation loves it ... ditto the solos I've chosen during = the summer while the choir is on vacation.   I've seen far too many organists try to impose their personal tastes on a congregation ... I was one. But by giving them what they want the vast = majority of the time, I've also been able to establish the Gregorian propers, and = Morning and Evening Prayer sung entirely to Gregorian Chant, with no complaints whatsoever.   I think it's incumbent on church musicians to take the measure of their congregations and start from THERE, rather than from some "pie in the sky" objective yardstick of what "should" and "shouldn't" be done.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Guitars & Organs-baroque From: JKVDP@aol.com Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 18:03:20 EDT   This morning on KING FM in Seattle (also on the internet) a work was = played by a Dutch composer "Petersen or Peterzoon (note NOT SWEELINCK) for organ, =   violin, lute and cello (or its baroque equivalent). Does anyone know = anything about this composer or this music? The music was quite memorable and the performance was attractive. I believe the work was composed in 1689 or so. = I will check the station's website tonite. The Seattle Calvinist  
(back) Subject: 2/7 Wurlitzer for sale From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 18:27:31 EDT   The 1926, Wurlitzer from a theatre in Meridian, Vermont is for sale. = Built and installed in 1926 the organ has the following ranks and percussions:   Tibia Clausa ( 8, 4, 2-2/3, 2) Flute (16, 8, 4, 2-2/3, 2, 1/3-5) Diapason (16, 8, 4) Vox Humana (8, 4) Salicional (8, 4, 2) Voix Celeste (8) Tuba (8) Marimba (Deagan, needs releathering) Glockenspiel Xylophone (reiterating and single stroke) Toy Counter (Bass Drum missing)   Two manual console, backrail needs to be replaced 5 HP Spencer blower   $15,000 or best reasonable offer, located in Wheeling W. Virginia, buyer to remove. Any further inquiries please contact me privately as I = am posting this for a colleague who has the organ.  
(back) Subject: RE: Give 'em what they want (was "Guitars and Organs") From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 18:12:26 -0700   > I've seen far too many organists try to impose their personal tastes on = a > congregation ... I was one. But by giving them what they want the > vast majority > of the time, I've also been able to establish the Gregorian > propers, and Morning > and Evening Prayer sung entirely to Gregorian Chant, with no complaints > whatsoever. > > I think it's incumbent on church musicians to take the measure of their > congregations and start from THERE, rather than from some "pie in the = sky" > objective yardstick of what "should" and "shouldn't" be done.   Bud says good stuff here, folks. I'm reminded of one fellow who referred = to the congregation as a bunch of "dumb bells" because their tastes didn't agree with his. But what Bud is saying here is what music ministry is all about. The people, and their worship. Nothing says we can't ease in some of what we like, but we have to meet the people where they are.   Dennis Goward    
(back) Subject: Re: subbing From: "Tim Rand" <tim@minn.net> Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 21:17:59 -0500   Chuck--Sorry to hear about your unhappy experience at your former church.   I've done quite a bit of subbing for a lot of years now and must say I'm = having the time of my life. I love the different organs, settings and people and = also love avoiding the types of hassles you described that are too common.   I agree with setting your own price. Our AGO chapter has a list of subs = and recommended salary guideline that I pretty much stick to, tho I'm not = always as consistent as I plan to be when business gets slow. Summers are always reliable, tho this year has been slower. I feel like I can usually = predict the next stock market correction when I'm not as busy. Now things are finally =   picking up (I heard the stock market dropped today!) Fortunately, I have = a good "day" job as a hospital nurse. That job is demanding enough that I = appreciate the slower times of the subbing year.     ___ Tim Rand Minneapolis MN    
(back) Subject: Re: Give 'em what they want (was "Guitars and Organs") From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Wed, 21 Jul 1999 00:36:51 -0400 (EDT)   Bud, splendid!! Meet them where they are and gently lead them along to where you believe God wants you to lead them. --Neil    
(back) Subject: (No subject) From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 23:51:00 -0500 (CDT)   At 10:23 99-07-19 -0400, you wrote: >Robert, I don't think you can totally blame lame organs and organists. >I do think that the pop music culture spawned the contemporary genre (I >do think this is a legitimate genre, folks!!). It most certainly is, and in the right hands it sounds quite nice and is a real hoot on the organ. You're also right that I can't place all the blame on "lame" organ(ist)s. However, I'm less interested in placing blame than I am in trying to learn from mistakes. While it's fine to identify outside conditions that hurt the field, I find it more productive to focus on those things which are under our control.   Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn    
(back) Subject: Re: (No subject) From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Wed, 21 Jul 1999 00:54:49 -0400 (EDT)   Robert, I don't believe CCM has hurt our field. It has simply expanded it. --Neil