PipeChat Digest #999 - Saturday, July 24, 1999
 
Re: Windchest types
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: Windchest types
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Sanfilippo Hopeful Heart concert
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: in defense of being multi-facted
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: in defense of being multi-facted
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
re: Sanfilippo Hopeful Heart concert
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Windchest types From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 17:41:07 -0400   Jason, if the wind chests have not been releathered since 1916, and they are still working, perhaps the present arrangement is optimal. That would be a very unusual life for the leather. And no, a lot of modern music doesn't work very well on organ. If = fact a lot of other music for piano doesn't work either, the kind with the long rolling chords you use the pedal to hold. You can adapt a lot of it if you're clever enough, but some things simply are more appropriate to = another instrument. I've had some of the same problems. This is a 1923/1962 Moller. The organ tech says there are a lot of these around NY and Pa. It ciphers, we pull the pipe and patch the pouch. When things get beyond what we can fix = we call the organ service. It's going to live a good long time yet, with = some care. Yes, it was designed for hymns and offertories primarily. It has tremolos and shades and different voices, but it's not a theatre organ. For interludes and such, I just cut the volume back on the appropriate piece. What else do you need to do? In some ways, you have a lot more technical knowhow than I do, but in others I have a lot more experience than you in a similar situation. = Don't be afraid to use a piano. It actually shows the grandeur of the organ = when you move to it, because of the contrast. Play piano for the singers, then organ for the hymns. Variety is interesting. Besides, (whisper behind hand) if you don't play the hymns very loud on the piano, they'll tell you they can't hear the music. <G> The whole trick is arrangement. Quite an art to it, and can take = quite a bit of time to make it work out. Once you get it figured out, write it down, as it will come back around again. The more you do, the better you will get. Study some of those theatre organ techniques, they'll help you bridge the difference between the contemporary arrangements and the church organ capabilities. I'm doing it, so you can do it too. Diane S. (straight@infoblvd.net)    
(back) Subject: Re: Windchest types From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 15:07:20 -0700   Jason - whatever you do, DON'T get rid of the 16' Open Wood ... those = things cost a FORTUNE! Depending on the scale, if you stopper them, you can get a 32' Bourdon, at least down to low G or F; from there down, you can add new stopped 32' pipes (if you have the money ... I think it's about $2000 per pipe), or make an INDEPENDENT 2-rank Resultant so the fundamental and the quint can be voiced so they'll work together properly. I've played several old organs where the real 32' stops at G or F and breaks to a quint, and = if it's properly voiced, you can barely hear the break.   GOOD electric slider windchests will survive about anything ... they're = more expensive to build initially; pitman chests are cheaper; they also don't = last as long.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Sanfilippo Hopeful Heart concert From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 22:18:19 EDT   My wife and I just returned from a great vacation! One word: Sanfilippo   Marion and Jasper Sanfilippo opened their georgeous home to 400 eager spectators on Saturday, then nearly 400 more on Sunday.   Awesome! Stupendous!! Extravagant!!! Unbelievable!!!!   Sanfilippo is the home to at least two hundred (I think) mechanical music instruments. There were small Edison players by the score, one handfull of =   giant mechanical music-making machines with violins, automatic mechanical band machines, some over ten feet tall and fifteen feet long, and steam engines that would operate on compressed air, if anyone would ask for it. Every piece is in mint condition and plays.   Sanfilippo has over an acre of floor space in his home, and every room contains some type of musical or steam item. In a separate building, Sanfilippo has gathered a small merry go round, a large steam engine (the kind that runs on iron rails) and a collection of other larger pieces, = truck, more musical band instruments, etc.   Lyn Larsen played the 5/80 Wurlitzer hybrid, sometimes solo, and sometimes =   with the Sanfilippo Salon Orchestra. This Big Band Era style band was led = by Jack Berthard, of the Schoenstein Organ Company. The piece I liked the = best was the 50s' song, ""Rock Around the Clock" with the full orchestra and = organ playing together. All the selections were from the 40s & 50s, including an =   older one that Lyn admitted that he had first heard as a teenager in the = 50s. The organ is located in the Music Salon, a Victorian decorated auditorium. =   The Salon bosts three floors of musical instruments. The basement, first floor and second floor are all open to the 20' x 20' stained glass ceiling =   over 60 feet off the basement floor. Two en Chamade ranks sprout out of = the area in which the stained glass is recessed, the Imperial Trumpet, and the =   Bugle Battaglia. This Bugle Battaglia sounds so piercing and clearly that = it makes a Post Horn and the Imperial Trumpet sound wimply. Did I say = Awesome???   In this open area, a white wrought iron elevator carries people from the basement to the second floor. A grand staircase, reminiscent of the one on =   the Titanic, also connects the basement to the first floor. At the foot of =   this stairway sits the largest of the mechanical band organs. it was over = 15' tall and 20' wide.   16' & 32' Diaphones lined the walls on either side of the stage. The pipe chambers were so clean one could eat off the floors. One Tuba rank is = located in the top chamber and were positioned at 45 degree angle off the = horizonal yet still behind the shades, aimed out over the audience. Did I saw = Awesome???   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: in defense of being multi-facted From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 24 Jul 1999 00:19:50 -0400 (EDT)   Monty, to quote our friends across the sea, you are "spot on." I was also taught that we are to be well-rounded musicians, able to do lots of things. But you forgot a very important skill. Being able to talk while playing your postlude (just kidding, folks). Peace. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: in defense of being multi-facted From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sat, 24 Jul 1999 00:27:20 -0400 (EDT)   Bruce, your right, but in some camps the pendulum is swinging back toward a moderate stance. You're also right in that CCM is by its nature very exclusionary (is that a word? it is now). No music for people to follow, means some know it, others can't sing it. If you can't sing it, what's wrong with you? Get with the program, dude, yada yada. CCM is also more consumer oriented and less participatory. I have yet to really see a praise team that isn't at least in small measure enjoying being up in front of every1. All I have ever read on the subject of worship always focuses on the fact that worship is for the people to enter into dialog with their God. The congregation should be worshiping--choirs, musicians, pastors, liturgists are merely enablers. I could go on and on and on, but this I'm sure will spawn some lively discussion. All this to say Bruce, you and I are not very far apart on this issue. --Neil    
(back) Subject: re: Sanfilippo Hopeful Heart concert From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 23:49:42 -0500   Stan --   Thanks for the report of your experiences at the Sanfilippo Estate. It surely must have been an indescribable experience to have been there -- = I'm glad you described it, anyway!! (Sanfilippo is one of the many places still on my "want to go to" list...)   Slightly Envious...<g>   Tim