PipeChat Digest #901 - Monday, June 7, 1999
 
Re: Things to see in Paris
  by "Vincent Lefevre" <vlefevere@unicall.be>
Re: Fw: the incredible shrinking prelude
  by <prswank@impop.bellatlantic.net>
Piano Rolls
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
Peterson shade motors
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: response after Scripture / before sermon
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Peterson shade motors, another view
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Fw: the incredible shrinking prelude
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by "Blaine Ricketts" <blaineri@home.com>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: response after Scripture / before sermon
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Fw: Peterson shade motors, another view
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: the incredible shrinking prelude
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
RE: the incredible shrinking prelude
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
Just been to the funeral from hell!
  by "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Peterson shade motors
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
mechanical expression shoes
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Things to see in Paris From: Vincent =?iso-8859-1?Q?Lef=E8vre?= <vlefevere@unicall.be> Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 18:27:40 +0200     --------------AE31D3A69CE2EB79696CF1A5 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable X-MIME-Autoconverted: from 8bit to quoted-printable by diplo.antw.online.be id LAA00629   "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" schreef:   > Greetings: > > Paris is such a beautiful city.! It is so difficult to suggest > things/places to see in a short time. > > May I suggest spending at least one evening just sitting at a quiet > corner cafe, drinking coffee (or another favorite beverage) and soaking > in the atmosphere. > > There is also a huge flea market on the outskirts of the city. You can > reach it by the Metro. > > Also, if you are in a real exploring mood, visit the catacombs! Not we= ll > advertised, but quite a tour! Or.....take the sewer tour! This shows > the routes used by the French Resistance during WWII. > > Tom Gregory > Waukesha WI USA > > p.s. In June my wife and I will stop in Paris when traveling to > Brussels to visit our AFS son. >   Don't forget to visit medieval Bruges, Tom. You will not regret. I know cause I live there Vincent   -- =D0=CF=11=E0=A1=B1=1A=E1     --------------AE31D3A69CE2EB79696CF1A5 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" schreef: <blockquote TYPE=CITE>Greetings: <p>Paris is such a beautiful city.!&nbsp; It is so difficult to suggest <br>things/places to see in a short time. <p>May I suggest spending at least one evening just sitting at a quiet <br>corner cafe, drinking coffee (or another favorite beverage) and soaking <br>in the atmosphere. <p>There is also a huge flea market on the outskirts of the city.&nbsp; You can <br>reach it by the Metro. <p>Also, if you are in a real exploring mood, visit the catacombs!&nbsp; Not well <br>advertised, but quite a tour!&nbsp; Or.....take the sewer tour!&nbsp; This shows <br>the routes used by the French Resistance during WWII. <p>Tom Gregory <br>Waukesha WI&nbsp; USA <p>p.s.&nbsp; In June my wife and I will stop&nbsp; in Paris when traveling to <br>Brussels to visit our AFS son. <br>&nbsp;</blockquote> <font color="#FF0000">Don't forget to visit medieval Bruges, Tom. You will not regret.</font> <br><font color="#FF0000">I know cause I live there</font> <br><font color="#FF0000">Vincent</font> <p>-- <br>&ETH;&Iuml;&agrave;&iexcl;&plusmn;&aacute; <br>&nbsp;</html>   --------------AE31D3A69CE2EB79696CF1A5--      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: the incredible shrinking prelude From: prswank@impop.bellatlantic.net Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 08:07:04 -0400   At our ELCA Lutheran Churches where I subtitute, I play what is titled in the bulletin "Gathering Music" (really the prelude) from 10:15 until 10:30, then the pastor gives the welcome and announcements. Then the prelude is announced by the pastor and I play a short prelude of about 1-2 minutes. It has come about with the revision of the church hymnals. I did the same in the Methodist church when they changed to a new hymnal. It is just as ridiculous, in my opinion, as having the confession and absolution service before the processional hymn, which is now common in Lutheran churches. It was listed that way in the Missouri Synod hymnal, but the church where I played did their own revision and had the processional hymn where it belonged, at the beginning. The writers of the hymnals, again in my opinion, have done some dreadful things recently, even though they have added some excellent new hymns. Paul R. Swank, Retired Organist/Choirmaster Christ Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod Baltimore, Maryland     > Original Message----- > From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Saturday, June 05, 1999 10:35 PM > Subject: the incredible shrinking prelude > > >There seems to be a trend in churches I've visited in my neck of the woods > >(one Methodist church, one UCC, one Presbyterian) to skip the traditional 5 > >to 10 minute prelude, start instead with announcements and/or greetings, > >then allow the organist to do a brief prelude of only 2-3 minutes' > >duration. They claim the congregation would only talk during the abolished > >longer prelude and that they'll be quiet and listen to this new reader's > >digest condensed version. Anyone else notice this alarming trend? > > > >R. Runyon > > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Piano Rolls From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 05:59:58 -0700 (MST)   I believe I saw a post here last week about finding piano rolls. Saw this link that may be of interest: http://www.onelist.com/subscribe.cgi/apianorollist Topics appear to include performers and recordings from turn of the century.   ^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^ R. A. Campbell, KUAT Communications-Modern Languages Building P.O.Box 210067 University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721    
(back) Subject: Peterson shade motors From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 09:28:41 EDT   DRAWKNOB@AOL.COM writes:   <I guess that's a good recommendation... but are they cost effective? IE - Worth the bucks? >   Concerning the Peterson shade motors: they can also be adjusted easily to a differing progression of shade openings.   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: response after Scripture / before sermon From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 15:03:29 +0100   Bud,   At All Saints, the organist will improvise some sort of fanfare while the Preacher processes from the Gospel to the Sermon. This is usually quite entertaining, and the organist gets to show off his improvising skills. He usually takes his inspiration from the Gospel Responses.   Richard. =========================================================   This message was sent to you by Richard Pinel. rpinel@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk   Tagline? What Tagline??      
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 10:08:57 -0500   Peterson swell motors are quite excellent, you just have to put the controller modules in such a place that the high pitched whining they make cannot be heard over the organ music. Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com brent@organwebring.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: <KriderSM@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, June 06, 1999 8:28 AM Subject: Peterson shade motors     > DRAWKNOB@AOL.COM writes: > > <I guess that's a good recommendation... but are they cost effective? IE - > Worth the bucks? > > > Concerning the Peterson shade motors: they can also be adjusted easily to a > differing progression of shade openings. > > Stan Krider > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 13:54:39 EDT   In a message dated 6/6/99 8:32:54 AM Central Daylight Time, KriderSM@aol.com writes:   << Concerning the Peterson shade motors: they can also be adjusted easily to a differing progression of shade openings. >>   That's another plus, thanks!]   bmjohns@fgi.net (Brent Johnson) writes:   <<Peterson swell motors are quite excellent, you just have to put the controller modules in such a place that the high pitched whining they make cannot be heard over the organ music.>>   Hmmm, that might be a problem since the organ is in a small case above the choir. The problem I have now with the swell shade motor is that it has a leak in the leather which results in a very noisy wind leak. Furthermore, the shades only catch on about three of twelve stages.   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors, another view From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 14:09:59 EDT   Hi John: Swell Engines work hard, especially if one uses them at all in a "pumping" motion. If it were me I would look into either rebuilding/releathering the 12 stage motor for price differential between that and Peterson units, which, in my opinion, are the best "electronic" on the market,,but,,,the whine of the motor unit is objectionable, it being of longer duration, and at a much higher pitch than the almost instantaneous "poof" of a primary exhausting, which is at a lower pitch and a very very quick duration. Usually the exhaust noise from a electro-pneumatic swell engine can be muffled to the point that it cannot be heard more than a foot away or so. Regards, ---Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: the incredible shrinking prelude From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 13:31:29 -0500       prswank@impop.bellatlantic.net wrote, in part:   > <snip>...The writers of the hymnals, again in my opinion, have done some dreadful > things recently, even though they have added some excellent new hymns.   It would be fair here, to point out that these changes are not instituted by the "writers" of the hymnals (and hymnals don't really have "writers" these days, at least not in the sense of individuals; "compilers" would be a better term, IMHO.). These changes come from else where. And some of them make more sense to me than customs they replaces, and as to those that don't, well, it was a sincere effort, and they will be revising this thing again, even if it is 20 or 30 more years [grin].   Personally, I like announcements divided in two; those that specifically involve the service itself, should come beforehand, and those that involve upcoming things, should come after. When these changes were being introduced some years back, I remember someone joking about how one worship leader had a custom of adding "announcement" he forgot during the announcement time to the general prayers "...And we thank you O Lord, and ask that you bless the Choir, who in spite of the fact that it is not in the bulletin, will be rehearsing at their normal time on Wednesday; And, we also ask you to guide the Quilter's Guild when they meet at Miss M.'s   As to moving the confession and absolution in Lutheran Uses to before the processional hymn, it was explained to me that this reflects the current thinking by those who are involved in the study of Liturgy that in ideal circumstances the Confession and Absolution are conducted at a separate service the night before, because the Sunday Morning should be reserved for the commemoration of the resurrection event on "the first day of the week".   As a side note, if the confession and absolution is done at the very beginning of the service lead from the rear, or from the middle of the congregation, then the processional hymn becomes more literally an entrance hymn, i.e. Introit.    
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: Blaine Ricketts <blaineri@home.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 12:20:54 -0700   The latest 16 stage Peterson motors are in a new Austin Organ at St. Mary's college, Moraga. The motors for the swell and choir are right behind the shades and there is no whining noise to be heard.   What vintage are the motors you speak of?   Blaine Ricketts     > > bmjohns@fgi.net (Brent Johnson) writes: > > <<Peterson swell motors are quite excellent, you just have to put the > controller modules in such a place that the high pitched whining they make > cannot be heard over the organ music.>> >  
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 14:29:13 -0500   It's not the Peterson motors that make noise, it's the controllers. It's handy to put the controllers close to the shades where you can watch the movement as you program them, but they usually have to be put a distance away so the noise doesn't carry over the sound of the instrument. Fortunately, Peterson usually includes a cable of 25 feet or so. The motors themselves are very quiet and work well. I will say again that this noise is the only objectionable thing about these motors. Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com brent@organwebring.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: Blaine Ricketts <blaineri@home.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, June 06, 1999 2:20 PM Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors     > The latest 16 stage Peterson motors are in a new Austin Organ at > St. Mary's college, Moraga. The motors for the swell and choir are > right behind the shades and there is no whining noise to be heard. > > What vintage are the motors you speak of? > > Blaine Ricketts > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 16:04:16 EDT   In a message dated 6/6/99 1:57:50 PM Eastern Daylight Time, DRAWKNOB@aol.com writes:   << <<Peterson swell motors are quite excellent, you just have to put the controller modules in such a place that the high pitched whining they make cannot be heard over the organ music.>>   Uh, excuse me BUT- the new Peterson motors do NOT do this at all.   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, Michigan  
(back) Subject: Re: response after Scripture / before sermon From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 13:03:07 -0700   The problem is that we follow the old American Prayer Book ... I play the Gospel procession back to the Sanctuary, but then we say the Credo, THEN we have announcements, THEN we have the sermon. I'm trying to talk him into preaching right after the Gospel, since the improv would cover everything he wants covered (and the Missal, which is an official book of the ACC, allows the sermon at that point), but he's dragging his heels so far.   Cheers,   Bud   Richard Pinel wrote:   > Bud, > > At All Saints, the organist will improvise some sort of fanfare while the > Preacher processes from the Gospel to the Sermon. This is usually quite > entertaining, and the organist gets to show off his improvising skills. He > usually takes his inspiration from the Gospel Responses. > > Richard. > ========================================================= > > This message was sent to you by Richard Pinel. > rpinel@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk > > Tagline? What Tagline?? > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Fw: Peterson shade motors, another view From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 15:43:46 -0500   I agree with keeping the pneumatic motors. A muffler box hides many noises. On my Wurli, the shades work fast and quiet -no electric motors or circuits to burn out due to lightening.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 06, 1999 1:12 PM Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors, another view     >Hi John: > Swell Engines work hard, especially if one uses them at all in a >"pumping" motion. If it were me I would look into either >rebuilding/releathering the 12 stage motor for price differential between >that and Peterson units, which, in my opinion, are the best "electronic" on >the market,,but,,,the whine of the motor unit is objectionable, it being of >longer duration, and at a much higher pitch than the almost instantaneous >"poof" of a primary exhausting, which is at a lower pitch and a very very >quick duration. Usually the exhaust noise from a electro-pneumatic swell >engine can be muffled to the point that it cannot be heard more than a foot >away or so. >Regards, >---Roc > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: the incredible shrinking prelude From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 18:07:43 -0400   When I started as organist at the First Church of Christ, Scientist here in Syracuse around 4 years ago the Prelude was 10 minutes in length. After completing my first year, the church board requested that I increase the Prelude to 15 minutes. A 15 minute prelude is also included on Wednesday evening meetings and the congregation responds by listening 99% of the time! What a delight! No ``alarming trend'' here.   Best regards,   Bonnie Beth Derby Producer & Host ``Orgelwerke'' & ``Choral Traditions'' WCNY-FM, 91.3; Syracuse; WUNY-FM, 89.5, Utica; WJNY-FM, 90.9, Watertown Organist, First Church of Christ, Scientist, Syracuse orge@dreamscape.com     Randolph Runyon posted the folowing:   > Subject: the incredible shrinking prelude > Date: Saturday, June 05, 1999 11:33 PM > > There seems to be a trend in churches I've visited in my neck of the woods > (one Methodist church, one UCC, one Presbyterian) to skip the traditional 5 > to 10 minute prelude, start instead with announcements and/or greetings, > then allow the organist to do a brief prelude of only 2-3 minutes' > duration. They claim the congregation would only talk during the abolished > longer prelude and that they'll be quiet and listen to this new reader's > digest condensed version. Anyone else notice this alarming trend?    
(back) Subject: RE: the incredible shrinking prelude From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 17:53:10 -0500   The service I play for (PC USA) begins with a prelude of just a few minutes. The people listen intently - while the choir processes. There is no pressure for the prelude to serve as "travel music" for the choir - or for accompanying the congregational chatter before the "real" service begins. The congregation, though small, appreciates good music - and I appreciate them! It helps me prepare for worship, too.   By the way, if any of you are Rodgers organ enthusiasts, I have begun the "Rodgers Organ Ring" with information on the home page at http://www.pldi.net/~murrows/rodgers.html.   Rod Murrow    
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: Prestant16@aol.com Date: Sun, 6 Jun 1999 21:24:13 EDT   I was considering using the peterson motor in my church organ, but I have decided on a superior method, which I suggest to anyone whose situation is right for it. I will be using the old fashioned mechanical linkage for swell shades. It is reliable, cheap, quiet when adjusted correctly, very fast, and is the MOST expressive of any swell shade control. Actually the Hook organ at Immac. Boston (which is electric action) uses mechanical action swell shades for both the swell division and the solo division. It is about a 60 or 70 foot run from the console, across the balcony, and up to the boxes.   Any comments on mechanical expression?   -William C.  
(back) Subject: Just been to the funeral from hell! From: Mark Quarmby <markq@flex.com.au> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 11:54:11 +1000   In all my 20 years of playing funerals and weddings, I have never had one like this morning!   I arrived at the church (Villa Maria, Hunters Hill) at 9.45am as planned for a 10am funeral, and when I went inside, there was no coffin, no priest, no congregation: nothing! I rang the organist who booked me yesterday (as he was unable to play for it) and only got his answering machine. I walked around the grounds looking for someone to ask, but there wasn't a person in sight. At 10am a young girl appeared saying: "Please tell me you are the organist! There has been a mix up. The funeral is at the catholic church in the next suburb and they are waiting for you. The priest just rang me to see if you were here as he forgot to tell the person who booked you that it wasn't here but at the other church!" I jumped into my car and drove over to Woolwich, a very picturesque harbourside suburb of Sydney. I had played the occasional wedding there, so I knew roughly where the church was. When I got near the church, all I could see were cars. I couldn't get a park anywhere. I parked illegally on a street corner and ran down the side street with the sign pointing to "Catholic Church". I couldn't see the church anywhere and was almost running downhill into Sydney Harbour at this stage. (I later discovered that someone had bent the sign to point in the wrong direction!) I looked up and there was the church on the hill above me. I had no choice but to scale the cliff face through the harbourside bush and climb up to the church. There were rustles in the bush and I just didn't want to know if they were snakes or not. Once up the top of the hill, I ran across the lawn as the undertaker gave me an order of service and said they had started without me. The first thing was a hymn! I entered the church and it was packed. People were standing everywhere and I remembered that the console (Rodgers electronic) was down the front. I had to push past everyone from the back of the church to the front. I finally made it to the console (which was surrounded by people standing) only to find it was locked. I thought hard and then remembered where they hid the key: behind the hymn number board beside the altar! I had to then walk up in front of everyone to get the key. I unlocked the organ: no power. I searched for some power points and fixed that just in time for the second hymn. I had no time to set up stops so just pushed a general, hoping for the best. I have never heard such big tremulants since I was at the cinema with a Wurlitzer! By the third verse I had managed to organise the registration by hand and get rid of the general I had pushed. Then a big dog came into the church, running up and down the aisle and around the coffin and started barking. At the beginning of the Eulogy, the priest apologised and told the congregation that he had told the organist the wrong church and that it was not my fault, which was very decent of him. He also announced that someone overnight had stolen all the flowers from the church which had been prepared yesterday for the funeral. The first hymn was sung later in the service. Just as I was about to launch into the recessional, someone tapped me on the shoulder (people were all standing around the console for the whole service) to say that he was going to play a "track" for the recessional: Frank Sinatra singing "I did it my way". After all that, they didn't pay me and the priest is going to chase it up for me. What a morning!   Mark    
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 21:32:57 -0500   Prestant16@aol.com wrote: > > I was considering using the peterson motor in my church organ, but I > have decided on a superior method, which I suggest to anyone whose situation > is right for it. I will be using the old fashioned mechanical linkage for > swell shades. It is reliable, cheap, quiet when adjusted correctly, very > fast, and is the MOST expressive of any swell shade control. Actually the > Hook organ at Immac. Boston (which is electric action) uses mechanical action > swell shades for both the swell division and the solo division. It is about > a 60 or 70 foot run from the console, across the balcony, and up to the boxes. > > Any comments on mechanical expression?   I grew up in England, where a far higher proportion of swellshade mechanisms are mechanical than in the U.S. where I now live. It is an unfortunate thing about pneumatic and electric swell engines, that there is a limit to how fast they can operate without slamming the swellshades and making a loud bang. They generally have to be fitted with dashpots or some similar inhibitor to slow them up. With mechanical swellshades your foot determines whether they slam or not. It is thus possible to open and close them on occasions very rapidly, but then pull back with your foot just at the last minute to prevent them slamming. It is very easy by these means to obtain a variety of sudden echo effects. The swellshades on our Aeolian-Skinner simply do not move rapidly enough to enable this to be done. I would therefore do almost anything to have mechanical swellshades even if the console was at some distance from the organ. Old-fashioned semaphore signals on the railroads used a linkage very similar to a mechanical swellshade linkage to operate, and were often capable of operating by a cable crisply a mile or more from the signal cabin. There is therefore almost no limit to how far the console can be from the organ and still have a mechanical linkage.   John Speller.  
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson shade motors From: flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw Date: Mon, 7 Jun 1999 10:35:12 +0800 (CST)       On Sun, 6 Jun 1999 Prestant16@aol.com wrote:   > > Any comments on mechanical expression?     Yes --- The Adam Stein Organ (1900) rebuilt by C. B. Fisk (about 1976 or so) in the Va. Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia, has mechanical linkage for the Swell Organ shades... and as a result of the rebuild, the shades are easy to control.... In fact, I can control the volume better with these shades than I can with shades that are operated by pneumatic motors...   Best wishes,       Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member         > > -William C. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: mechanical expression shoes From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jun 1999 21:48:20 -0700   If I'm not mistaken, the 3-manual Hook & Hastings in old St. Paul's RC in Cincinnati (since removed ... I think the pipes were salvaged and used in another organ) had a mechanical linkage to the swell shutters .... the key action was electric (mercury batteries originally), the stop action was tubular pneumatic, but the wind was raised by hand.   I don't recall it being heavy or hard to manage ... I think there were counter-weights or something ... it was a LONG time ago (grin).   I would think that mechanical would be the most desirable, where it's possible. Of course, I think that about a LOT of things (grin).   I'm reminded of the former Skinner in Caruth Auditorium at SMU ... the teak swell shutters were so heavy that they opened a full beat behind the movement of the swell shoe, and they were forever breaking the motors.   Cheers,   Bud