PipeChat Digest #917 - Sunday, June 13, 1999
 
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
Re: [Fwd: UU Church]
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists
  by <Marshal707@aol.com>
Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Fw: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
ADMIN - PLEASE READ
  by "ADMINISTRATION" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Fw: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists
  by <Marshal707@aol.com>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by <JKVDP@aol.com>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Improvisations
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
Thank You
  by "David McPeak <Mack>" <dm726@delphi.com>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
learning improvisation...
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Fw: learning improvisation...
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Fw: learning improvisation...
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Re:Bigoted Nonconformist
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Curious about improvisation...
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
RE: Bigoted Nonconformist
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
RE: Bigoted Nonconformist
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@worldnet.att.net>
"Birthday"
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@worldnet.att.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: mjolnir@ticnet.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 09:39:25 GMT   You wrote, in part:   > <snip>... > 2) For those of you who do improvise, to what extent do you rely = on > this skill in your services?   When I was active I would improvise from time to time. I found it to be = most useful on such occasions as when I estimated there were two many = communicants for two communion hymns, but not enough for three; "traveling" music when = the family of a child to be baptized is coming to / going from the baptismal = font, hymn preludes.   > 3) Any suggestions for my learning this craft?   First, "Just do it"; the thing that was hardest for me was doing it in = public the very first time. Pick your favorite period of music, baroque, = classical, whatever. Take a short melodic fragment from a hymn tune, but not = necessarily the first part of the first line. If I were going to use the hymn tune "Toplady" (often paired with the text "Rock of Ages, Cleft for me" I would = be more likely to improvise on that part of the tune which comes with "...let = me hide myself in thee." BTW, the fragment of hymntune you choose may impact = what style you choose for improvisation. Start "noodling" around, improvising = as you go. Pretend you are JSB. Can you create a fughetta from your = fragment? How about a little rondo? Remember two things. If you are practicing the =   skill of improvisation, you can't go back to fix errors. If try to redo = it to correct "errors" you are practicing, and not improvising. Listen to your efforts with a modestly "critical" ear, so that you follow "good = compositional practices", as defined by the era about which you are improvising, and do = not record your improvisations fur future study. For further consideration, consider taking the melodies from _two_ hymns, and try to weave them = together, for example, on Christmas, for communion, "What Child is this" and "Silent =   Night" are two hymns for communion. Try to play an additional verse to = "What Child is this" that also is constructed in such a way as to introduce = "Silent Night."   Practice this skill consistently. Do it the last five minutes of every practice session at the console.   Finally, figure out in advance what you are going to say one day when a visiting musician comes up after the service and says "I really liked that =   piece you played between the two communion hymns. Where can I get a copy = of that?"      
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 12:21:59 +0100   I improvise lots - sometimes whole Preludes and Fugues (seriously)   People tell me I am good at it.   And yet I've never had a FORMAL Organ lesson in my life, and, whilst I can play hymns and Psalms and things "off the page", I have very little "serious" repertoire at all, beyond a few simple Chorale Preludes - mostly Pachelbell.   Mark Checkley.   -----Original Message----- From: Mark Hopper <mahopper@bellsouth.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 13, 1999 05:38 Subject: Curious about improvisation...     >I'm interested to know some of the list members' experience with >improvisation. Personally, I consider myself to be an accomplished >recitalist and a decent service player. I hold a position in a large >Presbyterian Church with a sophisticated music program. I am also = halfway >through a Master of Sacred Music Program and am playing some terribly >difficult literature right now (Reubke 94th Psalm, Widor VI, etc.) >Unfortunately though, I can't hear a door slam! I couldn't sit down and >play 'Happy Birthday' if I had to! I think perhaps this is a slight lack of >natural aural talent that I have allowed to balloon into a giant >psychological roadblock. > 1) Is there anyone out there like me who doesn't improvise at = all? > 2) For those of you who do improvise, to what extent do you rely = on >this skill in your services? > 3) Any suggestions for my learning this craft? > >Thanks! >Mark >mahopper@bigfoot.com > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Fwd: UU Church] From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 07:04:59 -0500   Roy Redman wrote: > > I suppose we all read history the way we want to hear it, but do see > Latourette and other sources. I do remember that when we were attending > the Baptist Church during my childhood, some regarded the doctrine of = the > trinity as "Popeish". It was rejected along with the RC creeds which > contained the doctrine.   While we are getting a little off-topic here in discussing denominational minutiae, it is interesting how many Unitarian Churches were originally Baptist. That was true of the Unitarian Church in my home town of England, which had originally been the town's Baptist Church, but where the Trinitarians found it necessary to go and found a new Baptist Church around 1800. In other cases in England Presbyterian Churches became Unitarian, and indeed eventually there were hardly any Trinitarian Presbyterians left. Many of the Unitarian Churches in New England grew out of Congregationalist Churches, though I think the King's Chapel in Boston was originally Episcopal and still uses a modified Anglican liturgy. There are various shades of Unitarianism, and some of the earliest Unitarians were Arian -- i.e. believing that Christ was divine but not co-equal with the Father. The Unitarians in Transylvania, Hungary are interesting for retaining a full hierarchy with bishops, etc.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 06:08:20 -0700   Not even CLOSE, Dennis (grin).   Dennis Goward wrote:   > > > > Rick, could you email me privately and tell me what Onanism is. I > > haven't heard that term before. Thanks, Neil > > It has something to do with portable generators, I think. > > Dennis Goward > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists From: Marshal707@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 09:59:08 EDT   Methinks it has something to do with horticulture and scattering one's = seed upon the ground... (double ;-) )  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 09:55:16 -0400   Right on, Bud. Check out Genesis xxxvii:9.   -----Original Message----- From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 13, 1999 9:13 AM Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists     >Not even CLOSE, Dennis (grin). > >Dennis Goward wrote: > >> > >> > Rick, could you email me privately and tell me what Onanism is. I >> > haven't heard that term before. Thanks, Neil >> >> It has something to do with portable generators, I think. >> >> Dennis Goward >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Fw: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 09:42:06 -0500   AHA... Someone out there knows what it is. heehee.   Rick V.     -----Original Message----- From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 13, 1999 8:14 AM Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists     >Not even CLOSE, Dennis (grin). > >Dennis Goward wrote: > >> > >> > Rick, could you email me privately and tell me what Onanism is. I >> > haven't heard that term before. Thanks, Neil >> >> It has something to do with portable generators, I think. >> >> Dennis Goward >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Fw: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 09:42:53 -0500   Farming, perhaps??   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Marshal707@aol.com <Marshal707@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 13, 1999 9:01 AM Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists     >Methinks it has something to do with horticulture and scattering one's = seed >upon the ground... (double ;-) ) > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: ADMIN - PLEASE READ From: ADMINISTRATION <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 11:21:56 -0500   Folks   As interesting as some of it has been we are really getting off-topic and off-base with the UU Church / Bigoted nonconformists Thread. i would suggest we wrap it up or take it to private mail for those that are interested in continuing it.   David   ******************************** David Scribner Co-Owner - Technical Administratior PipeChat   850-478-9635 mailto:david@blackiris.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Fw: Bigoted nonconformists From: Marshal707@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 14:20:22 EDT   Might have something to do with a whitish fertilizer of sorts...  
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: JKVDP@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 17:20:00 EDT   In a message dated 99-06-13 00:40:45 EDT, mahopper@bellsouth.net writes:   << 3) Any suggestions for my learning this craft? I recall someone comparing learning to improvise with a child learning to walk. How do you learn? You take a small step, fall down, get back up = and keep trying until you've learned how to walk. Jerry in Seattle  
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 22:17:28 +0100   LEARN it ??   Well, I "learnt: it because I've always been good at playing Piano "by ear", even as a little boy. "You hum it, I'll play it". It all sprang from there.   I'm not sure how, if at all, one LEARNS to improvise.   I would have thought one might ask a good Organ Teacher of the French school, because they're the great liturgical improvisers - the practice is ingrained in their liturgy.   I'm sure they would have some ideas, but I don't.   Mark Checkley. -----Original Message----- From: JKVDP@aol.com <JKVDP@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 13, 1999 10:21 Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation...     >In a message dated 99-06-13 00:40:45 EDT, mahopper@bellsouth.net writes: > ><< 3) Any suggestions for my learning this craft? >I recall someone comparing learning to improvise with a child learning to >walk. How do you learn? You take a small step, fall down, get back up = and >keep trying until you've learned how to walk. >Jerry in Seattle > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 19:01:50 EDT   Dear Mark, I remember my mother whistling the melody in the kitchen while = I learned how to play "pop" music on the M-3 Spinet Hammond. Listening to = the greats in theatre organ also helped me to see how you could change from = major to minor keys and take the melody or part of it and mix it with another melody which I thought was fascinating. It was difficult to do this with = the pedals or staves that came out of the organ but I was able to practice on =   the old Hall organ at St Patricks's and, as my friends guarded the doors, = I was able to play "pop" and some of the old theatre pieces. I can still = play "Flying Down to Rio" and "Moonlight on the Ganges" . At the time I learned =   these pieces, I didn't even know where the Ganges was. LOL Sincerely, = Paul P. Valtos  
(back) Subject: Improvisations From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 18:26:43 -0500   Read three interesting posts on this (improvs.) and thought I'd join in. Some people are blessed with a good +ACI-ear+ACI- while others can't play = without music. Nothing wrong here in either case. Being able to play a piece from music then put the music aside and play it is a good start. Some can do this. We are all blessed with certain gifts -some more than others. This should not, however, deter us from striving further in our (musical) endeavours. Some instructors frown upon +ACI-ear+ACI- improvising and playing by = +ACI-rote+ACI- -which is a very mechanical way of playing. I found that out in High School band. Getting a good foundation in music theory and reading is basic to all musicians -tho one would be surprised at the number of professional musicians who cannot read a note, but do great and wonderous things with = and in the music and instrument they play. Let not this frighten you tho. If you feel comfortable with a piece of music, play around with it. Try something you may have thought of while playing it.   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net        
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 1999 00:12:06 +0100   Actually, if you can play folk songs / country and western music on the guitar or ukulele (as can I) you learn to "think in chords".   Once you are thinking in chords and chord progressions you can transfer these to the Organ or Piano and then "weave" tunes around them with your other hand, perhaps on another manual.   I think, on reflection, that that is much like what I do when I improvise, say, around the tune of the communion hymn whilst waiting for the SILLY little choirboys to get back to their places and get their music out.   I have the feeling that Mr. Bach probably did much the same, thereby producing "off the cuff" chorale preludes.   Take care, Mark Checkley. -----Original Message----- From: CHERCAPA@aol.com <CHERCAPA@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Monday, June 14, 1999 12:05 Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation...     >Dear Mark, I remember my mother whistling the melody in the kitchen while = I >learned how to play "pop" music on the M-3 Spinet Hammond. Listening to the >greats in theatre organ also helped me to see how you could change from major >to minor keys and take the melody or part of it and mix it with another >melody which I thought was fascinating. It was difficult to do this with the >pedals or staves that came out of the organ but I was able to practice = on >the old Hall organ at St Patricks's and, as my friends guarded the doors, = I >was able to play "pop" and some of the old theatre pieces. I can still = play >"Flying Down to Rio" and "Moonlight on the Ganges" . At the time I = learned >these pieces, I didn't even know where the Ganges was. LOL Sincerely, = Paul >P. Valtos > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Thank You From: "David McPeak <Mack>" <dm726@delphi.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 20:28:11 -0400   My thanks to all who replied to my request for suggestions of cheuches to go to in Montreal and Quebec. My vacation does overlap some of the OHS Convention so I may attend some of those events too.   Cheers, Dave McPeak    
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 22:42:36 -0400 (EDT)   >I'm interested to know some of the list > members' experience with improvisation. For me, improvisation is one of the most valuable tools I have for playing a service, other than being able to read music, of course. A small group of people remain to listen to closing voluntaries which are listed in the service leaflet. However, when the closing voluntary is indicated as an improvisation, the group remaining to listen is larger; there is evidently a fascination for "off the cuff" music, or witnessing creation in process.   >For those of you who do improvise, to what > extent do you rely on this skill in your > services? I usually play literature for voluntaries, but occasionally (like today) I improvise. One of our parishoners is home from Cincinnati Conservatory and I asked him if he would like to play the voluntaries at 11 am. We were in a time crunch because of a special presentation by the youth group, so there was not much time to spare. I improvised a short prelude and when I noticed everyone was in place I stopped early to give us an extra few minutes.   In addition, this church likes the victorian touches of walking- and background music, so I also get to improvise during prayers, which to me is even more inspiring than doing voluntaries. Additionally, improvisation in invaluable in weddings (treading water until they're ready and stretching processions).   > I couldn't sit down and play 'Happy Birthday' if > I had to! >Any suggestions for my learning this craft? Start by learning to play "Happy Birthday"! Just sit down and do it: play the melody, single note, in various keys, major and minor. Then add a second voice in parallel movement; you'll realize that there are times when parallelism does not work and your ear will help you fix it. Then add a pedal part, beginning with a drone. Continuing on you can embellish the melody, or the accompaniment, playing eighths against quarters, etc; maybe adding parallel voicing in the accompaniment as well. As you play, try to picture the intervals on a staff; this will help you to being to think "theoretically."   Please keep us posted on your progress. Also, listen to other people improvise, and get recordings of improvisations. You may decided that your improvisation is not as bad as you think!! ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Barking dogs don't bite, but they themselves don't know it. -- Shalom Aleichem    
(back) Subject: learning improvisation... From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 23:08:55 EDT   Mark, I, on the other hand, can read music however slowly. Once I learn it, the music literally flows from my brain to the keyboard(s) with no effort at = all. Yet, I cannot sight read at all. In fact, I am most envious of you who do possess this skill.   I am basically a player of popular music who enjoys fine classical organ music. Playing theatre organ is my hobby, so this may not help. A "C" chord is a "C" chord, regardless of what combination of keys are pressed. Improvisation seems to be learning how to break away from the precisely written music, a fact that most classical organists were taught precisely NOT to do. ... or maybe some of us were born with the = improvisation skill and other were born to play the notes as written... who knows????   Stan Krider   mahopper@bigfoot.com recently wrote:   <snip>I couldn't sit down and play 'Happy Birthday' if I had to! I think perhaps this is a slight lack of natural aural talent that I have allowed = to balloon into a giant psychological roadblock. 1) Is there anyone out there like me who doesn't improvise at all? 2) For those of you who do improvise, to what extent do you rely on this skill in your services? 3) Any suggestions for my learning this craft?<snip>  
(back) Subject: Fw: learning improvisation... From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 22:23:20 -0500   Having played silent movies, improvising is a definite asset. Keeping both eyes on the movie as the scenes change and what you're playing, is really = by the seat of ones pants!!   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: KriderSM@aol.com <KriderSM@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, June 13, 1999 10:12 PM Subject: learning improvisation...     >Mark, >I, on the other hand, can read music however slowly. Once I learn it, the >music literally flows from my brain to the keyboard(s) with no effort at all. >Yet, I cannot sight read at all. In fact, I am most envious of you who do >possess this skill. > >I am basically a player of popular music who enjoys fine classical organ >music. Playing theatre organ is my hobby, so this may not help. >A "C" chord is a "C" chord, regardless of what combination of keys are >pressed. Improvisation seems to be learning how to break away from the >precisely written music, a fact that most classical organists were taught >precisely NOT to do. ... or maybe some of us were born with the improvisation >skill and other were born to play the notes as written... who knows???? > >Stan Krider > >mahopper@bigfoot.com recently wrote: > ><snip>I couldn't sit down and play 'Happy Birthday' if I had to! I think >perhaps this is a slight lack of natural aural talent that I have allowed to >balloon into a giant psychological roadblock. > 1) Is there anyone out there like me who doesn't improvise at = all? > 2) For those of you who do improvise, to what extent do you rely = on >this skill in your services? > 3) Any suggestions for my learning this craft?<snip> > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: learning improvisation... From: Tom Hoehn <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 23:23:16 -0400   Hi list -   Having watched and listened to Rick piloting the Trubey Hall WurliTzer on more than one occassion, he really does know what he's talking about...playing by the seat of his pants for Little Rascals and Laurel and Hardy flix. Improvisation is nothing more than letting your feelings flow from your fingers to the keys.   tom     VEAGUE wrote: > > Having played silent movies, improvising is a definite asset. Keeping = both > eyes on the movie as the scenes change and what you're playing, is = really by > the seat of ones pants!! > > Rick V. > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Re:Bigoted Nonconformist From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 23:46:57 -0400 (EDT)   Jeff, you are quite right. I've often said that Pope John Paul II would make a great Baptist 8-). --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Curious about improvisation... From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 23:51:54 -0400 (EDT)   Mr. Hopper: questions for you-- 1) do you understand theory, in particular harmonic progressions? 2) can you hear where music is going while you are playing your literature? 3) are you sure you can't play happy birthday w/o music? 4) do you memorize your literature?   Since improv comes naturally to me (I don't mean to sound pompous), perhaps I can help you get started. E mail me privately if you wish. --Neil    
(back) Subject: RE: Bigoted Nonconformist From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Mon, 14 Jun 1999 00:09:00 -0400 (EDT)   Dennis, you have addressed an important issue. Church music is not just a job. It is, however, a legitimate profession (part or full time notwithstanding), but more than that. If it is to be "church music", ministry is the prime objective--leading people to God and his throne of grace, whatever that means in the particular church or denom. One's concepts of worship, theology, ministry have everything to do with how he/she will function as a church musician. I do not mean to imply that this is the only qualification. God forbid!! I cannot justify allowing someone with good theology to sit on the organ bench that cannot play their way out of a paper bag, just to satisfy a legalistic code of "theology." Church music is about service, being a servant, albeit a musical one. This is a lesson that I'm still learning, and probably will till the day I retire--25 yrs or so from now. I shall now descend from my soapbox. --Neil    
(back) Subject: RE: Bigoted Nonconformist From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 21:24:28 -0700   > Church music is about service, being a servant, albeit a musical one.   Wow, good to see other folks share this view. I made a similar concept = once and got flamed clean off another list (not this one).   Dennis    
(back) Subject: "Birthday" From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 1999 21:27:22 -0700   Forgive the cross post, but this is applicable to all three lists -- even the other list, but that's okay.   We have had the AOB organ with us in our home now for one year. We were going to have a party and invite some of it's friends, but none of the = other AOB organs in town could make it -- they were all working today!   Dennis Goward   Personal: http://members.xoom.com/dgoward/ Business: http://www.desertsounds.com http://www.desertsoft.net