PipeChat Digest #928 - Thursday, June 17, 1999
 
Re: Hyfrydol
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
[musiclassical] 17 JUNE Almanac (fwd)
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
Re: Hyfrydol
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
New Material and hymn playing (was: Hyfrydol)
  by "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com>
Re: Teaching musical tastes
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: CONSOLE AVAILABLE -- ACT FAST!!
  by "Randy Newman" <rnewman@dilligaff.rutgers.edu>
Re: Hyfrydol
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
choice couplers
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: 1998 Ten Top Hymns
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
Re: CONSOLE AVAILABLE -- ACT FAST!!
  by "Randy Newman" <rnewman@dilligaff.rutgers.edu>
hymns, new materials, hymn-playing, etc.
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: hymn-playing, etc.
  by "Robert Horton" <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU>
Re: New Material and hymn playing (was: Hyfrydol)
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
RE:choice couplers
  by "jeffrey korns" <jakorns@worldnet.att.net>
Residence organ
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
New Organ at Vassar College
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Hyfrydol From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 08:50:32 -0700   "Sing of Mary" is teetering on the verge (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Mark Checkley wrote:   > Oh dear. > What other fine stuff have you time-capsuled? > > tut. > > Mark Checkley. > > -----Original Message----- > From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> > To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Thursday, June 17, 1999 05:59 > Subject: Hyfrydol > > >I have consigned Hyfrydol to that stack of stuff that needs to go into = a > >time capsule and be forgotten for a generation, along with Bach's > >Toccata and Fugue in d minor and the Widor Toccata. > > > >We sing it ONCE a year, on the Sunday After Ascension. Episcopalians > >would sing it every Sunday if they could get away with it. At St. > >Matthew's, they can't (grin). > > > >Cheers, > > > >Bud > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: [musiclassical] 17 JUNE Almanac (fwd) From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 08:56:58 -0700 (MST)     From: AcoustiCDigest editors <acoustic_digest@yahoo.com>   http://www.angelfire.com/biz/musiclassical/17jun.html           =3D=3D=3D GET our PLAYlists: http://www.angelfire.com/biz3/alm/lb.html AcoustiCDigest/Radio=3D P.O.Box 16221 Tucson AZ 85732 Music Directories: http://AcoustiCD.com CD sales: http://mycdstore.com _________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com     ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Looking to expand your world? http://www.onelist.com ONElist has 170,000 e-mail communities from which to choose! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ compact disc discounts comparison shopping at:http://mycdstore.com and = visit the Internet Classical Music Directory index at http://acousticd.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Hyfrydol From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 08:56:01 -0700   There's nothing WRONG with Hyfrydol, other than it's too long for our = small church ... the Sacred Ministers end up standing in front of the altar and shuffling their feet for about four verses if we use it for a processional = ... it's just been overdone in most Episcopal churches.   And, I have to be careful with long hymns and/or hymns that have long = phrase lines in our VERY dead room ... everybody runs out of breath one way or = the other, whether I play them fast enough to sustain the lines, or at the = normal tempo.   Cheers,   Bud   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote:   > DEAREST BUD, > > What the !@#$ is wrong with HYFRYDOL? It's a beautiful work... as a = matter > of fact, I want it played/sung at my funeral -- 50 some years from now = (I > hope)! > > John > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: New Material and hymn playing (was: Hyfrydol) From: "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 09:38:40 PST       Mark Checkley wrote:   > I am convinced that the generally poor standard of Congregational > singing in many Churches is brought about by the inclusion - for > whatever well-meaning or nefarious reasons - of FAR TOO MUCH > NEW MATERIAL.   I'd agree with this to a large extent, with a few qualifications.   I do believe that recent trends in hymnody have spawned a plethora of unsingable and/or shallow music which loses its luster after a few experiences or is poorly matched to the needs of the congregation.   My parish, Augustana Lutheran Church, has tried to balance the inclusion of new music with the need for familiarity. Although we're not perfect, we've been able to expand the repertoire of the worshipping members while still staying firmly rooted in those hymns which are the cornerstone of the church's tradition. I think three keys to introducing new music are: =   don't unveil too much new material at once, select things that will be as much in demand by the congregation in 10 years as they are now, and, finally, pick things that meet the musical needs and abilities of your particular parish.   However, there's another element here. I believe hymn singing has been in =   decline for decades, long before the call for new music became so strong. =   In fact, the decline in congregational singing may have well sparked the current trend to introduce lots of new music.   I find that organists these days don't adequately understand how to play hymns so that they can be sung easily and insightfully by their congregation. We have a great percentage of organists who can make it through any of the "8 Little Preludes and Fugues", a slow movement from a Mendelssohn Sonata or the Widor Toccata, but a shrinking percentage who really know how to lead a congregation.   I find it quite distressing when I hear an organist rush through hymns, using a tempo even their choir can't keep up with. Many times, people are =   gasping, because no hesitation or break is offered so that people can grab =   a breath, even at the end of verses. It's almost like the organist wants to show how fast they can play, daring the singers to keep up.   Then, there's the disregard for the hymn text. So much is being said by the poetry contained within the hymn, yet many organists simply hit a button and play, not knowing verse to verse what is being said.   However, the prelude and postlude are usually well worked out and played with skill and sensitivity.   I would suggest that this habit among organists is more detrimental to hymn singing than any new music which is being offered. If we spent even a fraction of the time on hymn playing that we spent with literature, our congregations would respond with inspired, powerful singing. As teachers, =   we need to instruct our students in the art of leading singing, not just "playing a hymn".   Mark       Mark Huth Rodgers Instruments, LLC mhuth@rodgers.rain.com http://www.rodgersinstruments.com   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D   Many of us would be better off financially if it weren't for the extravagance of our neighbors.    
(back) Subject: Re: Teaching musical tastes From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 14:48:48 -0400   And even before that, they seem to have learned nothing in their = growing-up years, in their home congregations, schools, etc. So the problem just = keeps perpetuating itself.   And then, when on the rare occasion that a pastor or church musician comes along who wants to elevate the congregation's tastes--oh, what an uphill battle they have!   Alan Freed   >From: George.Greene@RossNutrition.com >To: " - *pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: 1998 Ten Top Hymns >Date: Thu, Jun 17, 1999, 9:10 AM   > Apparently the > seminary does not make ANY attempt to instill ANY sort of musical taste = or > awareness in their product these days!  
(back) Subject: Re: CONSOLE AVAILABLE -- ACT FAST!! From: Randy Newman <rnewman@dilligaff.rutgers.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 14:21:42 -0400 (EDT)     Tim,   you mentioned a 61 note reed offset chest. that sounds like it would be perfect for a 8' oboe i have sitting around ready to go into the organ. do you have a rough estimate of the size or weight of the chest? any idea how old it is or the condition of the leather? also, any possibility it could be shipped? i would pay for shipping of course. sorry for so many questions. thanks.   randy               > As of this morning, the old organ is being dismantled to make way for = the > new one. If anyone is interested in this console, please email = privately > >>ASAP<< with an offer -- before the church throws it away. = (literally!) > Time IS of the essence -- they won't keep it around long. > > 2m Moller pneumatic console. (1968) Off white/golden oak finish in > excellent shape. AGO pedalbd and bench w/backrest. Tilting tab stop > controls: 5 ped, 13 Sw, 13 Gt. Pistons: 4 each division, 4 Generals. > SW and CRESC pedals. Lucite music rack. Controlled 10 rks of pipes. > Located in Batesville, Arkansas. > > No storage or shipping available, (from me, anyway...) as the console > remains the property of the church. It is my hope that SOMEBODY might = be > able to use the thing, and if so, I will be happy to help make the = proper > 'connections'. > > A few other odd pieces might also be available: > > -- Pneu. swell motors (indiv. bag type -- about 2 dozen) > -- 21 note EP chime action (no tubes) > -- 61 note EP offset reed chest (NOT Moller; builder unknown) > > Everything else is either being reused, or not worth reusing. > > Cheers! > > Tim (the packrat that's running out of space to keep things) > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Hyfrydol From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 19:52:40 +0100   >I am convinced that the generally poor standard of Congregational >singing in many Churches is brought about by the inclusion - for >whatever well-meaning or nefarious reasons - of FAR TOO MUCH >NEW MATERIAL.   Here Here! There is a limit!   Richard      
(back) Subject: choice couplers From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 12:44:16 EDT   I liked the Bourbon to Organist 8' coupler idea so much that I must add = two couplers for Diane Bish, the cyclist:   Pedal to Metal 1' Pedal to Metal 2' (for more 'stop'ping power)   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: 1998 Ten Top Hymns From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 16:55:18 +0100   Yes   Absolutely, but it's seasonal to All Saints and Saints' Days, when we do it invariably; about 10 times a year.   Mark Checkley.   -----Original Message----- From: Jason McGuire <jason@johannus-norcal.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, June 17, 1999 04:03 Subject: Re: 1998 Ten Top Hymns     > >> Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven >> Angel voices ever singing >> Come let us join our cheerful songs >> All hail the power of Jesus' name >> Alleluia, sing to Jesus >> Love Divine, all loves excelling >> > >That's a great one, how about SINE NOMINE ... very upbeat, joyous = sounding >... lots of pedal action. I have played it in several churches, but one = in >particular the pedalboard was in view of the congregation and someone = came >up afterwards and commented on the pedal activity. > >Jason > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: CONSOLE AVAILABLE -- ACT FAST!! From: Randy Newman <rnewman@dilligaff.rutgers.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 15:24:34 -0400 (EDT)       sorry to post to everyone, still trying to get the hang of this!   randy      
(back) Subject: hymns, new materials, hymn-playing, etc. From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 12:22:02 -0700   I was faced with somewhat of an opposite problem when I came to St. Matthew's ... Earnest Young Rector is home-grown Anglican Catholic ... he read for Orders with the Archbishop and has spent virtually his whole ministry (about 15 years) at St. Matthew's. Now, St. Matthew's is only about 18 years old as a parish; they've had an organ and a building for about seven years; I am the first professional musician to be engaged. As a result, the choir and congregation know MANY more hymns than the Rector, who was content to ring the changes on the same hundred or so, year in and year out, omitting many of the congregation's favorites because HE didn't know them ... many of the Anglican "top forty" that I listed on my former post.   So it has been a deal of work to get HIM to expand the repertoire, but NOT the choir and/or the congregation. Time and again, I've dragged him kicking and screaming into singing a "new" hymn, only to discover that the congregation knows it by heart and sings it like Baptists.   There are a FEW things we need to learn in the 1940, but not many ... the plainsong tunes to "Sion, Praise Thy Saviour Singing" (Lauda Sion) and "Jesu, the Very Thought of Thee" (Jesu dulcis memoria), a few of the Victorian classics like "Jesus, My Lord, My God, My All" (St. Chrysostom ... different words and music than the old RC Blessed Sacrament hymn) and "Not Always On the Mount May We" (Mont Richard ... Percy Buck) and a couple of "modern" tunes like "From Glory to Glory Advancing" (St. Keverne ... C.S. Lang) and "Strength For Service, Lord" (Malabar ... David McKay Williams).   We ARE talking about publishing an Anglican Catholic supplement to the 1940, most to supply the missing Office Hymns, more seasonal and communion hymns, and possibly more Mass settings, but that's a VERY touchy subject with Anglican Catholics ... our parishes divide into two categories: either the congregation sings Merbecke and Willan (and possibly Missa Marialis) and is having NONE of singing ANYTHING else, or the choir sings whatever setting they want to. For good or for ill, St. Matthew's is one of the former ... I don't see us EVER singing choral Mass settings, except MAYBE on Feast Days ... certainly never on Sundays.   Hymn playing should be the FIRST thing taught in organ lessons, and it's usually the LAST (or not at all). I was blessed with a piano teacher who was also an Anglican organist ... she made SURE that I started at Hymn #1 in the 1940 and went to Hymn #600, and then on through the chants and service music ... and she was in cahoots with my organ teacher ... everything I played for HER, I had to play for HIM ... soprano on a separate manual; tenor an octave higher on a separate manual; soprano in the PEDALS on a 4' or 2' stop, etc. etc. etc. And the PHRASING and BREATHING and articulation for EACH and EVERY verse had to be not only practiced but MARKED, a habit that I STILL have, fifty years later. Ditto the pedalling, if it was at all complicated.   That's a good argument for NOT revising denominational hymnals so often .... it's taken me a lifetime to collect descants, free accompaniments, hymn preludes, etc. for the 1940 ... while a good number of tunes DO appear in the new book, a good number don't, and/or the versions are different.   One thing that I do regularly if the hymn is the slightest bit unfamiliar (and practically always if it's plainsong) is to solo out the melody on a separate manual, at least until they get going. I don't make it a LOT louder if it's plainsong, but it's there for them to follow.   After fifty years, I've decided that a lot of organists DO play the hymns too loudly ... if I can't hear the choir in procession when they get to the front of the church, then I'M playing too loudly. The trick to leading congregational singing is not volume, but clear articulation and rock-solid rhythm. And, unlike conventional wisdom, I think mixtures often obscure the melody. My former tenor soloist, who is a VERY good musician, told me that when he sings with an organ with multiple mixtures, what he HEARS is "white noise", rather than the melody line on top. So I seldom use mixtures for congregational singing, except maybe the Swell mixture in conjunction with the Swell reeds for the last verse. Of course, if that's the ONLY way you CAN get ENOUGH volume, then you have to use them, but my preference is for good, solid, meaty diapasons at 8-4-2.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc. From: Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 15:00:12 -0600   >Hymn playing should be the FIRST thing taught in organ lessons, and it's >usually the LAST (or not at all). By "the first thing taught in organ lessons", I seriously hope that you mean that it's the first thing done within a lesson hour, not that a hymn is the first organ music a new student ever touches. There are = sooooo many "unwritten" subtleties involved in hymn-playing that it is simply disastrous to try and throw a hymn at a new student while they're still trying to get hands and feet moving together. If, however, that is what you're trying to say, I really have to disagree with you on this one. While the church might own the organs, it does NOT own the organ students. The organ is a musical instrument, just like the trombone and the violin. Students need to learn how to play first, and then service playing is added to that. Simply put, you've got to be a musician before you can be called to be a church musician, we all know what happens otherwise.   Rob Horton     I was blessed with a piano teacher who >was also an Anglican organist ... she made SURE that I started at Hymn >#1 in the 1940 and went to Hymn #600, and then on through the chants and >service music ... and she was in cahoots with my organ teacher ... >everything I played for HER, I had to play for HIM ... soprano on a >separate manual; tenor an octave higher on a separate manual; soprano in >the PEDALS on a 4' or 2' stop, etc. etc. etc. And the PHRASING and >BREATHING and articulation for EACH and EVERY verse had to be not only >practiced but MARKED, a habit that I STILL have, fifty years later. >Ditto the pedalling, if it was at all complicated. > >That's a good argument for NOT revising denominational hymnals so often >... it's taken me a lifetime to collect descants, free accompaniments, >hymn preludes, etc. for the 1940 ... while a good number of tunes DO >appear in the new book, a good number don't, and/or the versions are >different. > >One thing that I do regularly if the hymn is the slightest bit >unfamiliar (and practically always if it's plainsong) is to solo out the >melody on a separate manual, at least until they get going. I don't make >it a LOT louder if it's plainsong, but it's there for them to follow. > >After fifty years, I've decided that a lot of organists DO play the >hymns too loudly ... if I can't hear the choir in procession when they >get to the front of the church, then I'M playing too loudly. The trick >to leading congregational singing is not volume, but clear articulation >and rock-solid rhythm. And, unlike conventional wisdom, I think mixtures >often obscure the melody. My former tenor soloist, who is a VERY good >musician, told me that when he sings with an organ with multiple >mixtures, what he HEARS is "white noise", rather than the melody line on >top. So I seldom use mixtures for congregational singing, except maybe >the Swell mixture in conjunction with the Swell reeds for the last >verse. Of course, if that's the ONLY way you CAN get ENOUGH volume, then >you have to use them, but my preference is for good, solid, meaty >diapasons at 8-4-2. > >Cheers, > >Bud > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: New Material and hymn playing (was: Hyfrydol) From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 22:56:24 +0100   I certainly agree that:-   A. Hymn-playing is a distinct skill which many otherwise excellent = Organists lack.   B. Hymn-playing is the most important thing an Organist does in Church.   C. Hymn playing for Organists and Hymn-singing / leading for Choirs lies at the crux of our liturgical work, and deserves MUCH practice.   D. Many Organists / Choirmasters don't rehearse the hymns.   E. Those that do, tend to rehearse them inadequately.   I well recall, in my previous parish, one particular Sunday when I was rather pleased with myself because I had just dragged the small Choir through their first (and quite good) performance of the Byrd Ave Verum Corpus.   After the service, my Parish Priest (then, as now, a man I love and respect) reprimanded me because the hymn-singing had not been very good.   He observed that we had done a rather demanding anthem rather well, and thereby used practice time that should have been spent on the hymns.   He asked me, in future, not to prepare anthems until I was quite certain that all the hymns were secure and well-known, as he was quite happy never to have an anthem, but the Choir MUST be able to lead ALL the hymns with confidence.   On reflection, I think his priority was a sound one, and it is one I have sought to apply since.   Mark Checkley. -----Original Message----- From: Mark Huth <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, June 17, 1999 07:51 Subject: New Material and hymn playing (was: Hyfrydol)         Mark Checkley wrote:   > I am convinced that the generally poor standard of Congregational > singing in many Churches is brought about by the inclusion - for > whatever well-meaning or nefarious reasons - of FAR TOO MUCH > NEW MATERIAL.   I'd agree with this to a large extent, with a few qualifications.   I do believe that recent trends in hymnody have spawned a plethora of unsingable and/or shallow music which loses its luster after a few experiences or is poorly matched to the needs of the congregation.   My parish, Augustana Lutheran Church, has tried to balance the inclusion of new music with the need for familiarity. Although we're not perfect, we've been able to expand the repertoire of the worshipping members while still staying firmly rooted in those hymns which are the cornerstone of the church's tradition. I think three keys to introducing new music are: don't unveil too much new material at once, select things that will be as much in demand by the congregation in 10 years as they are now, and, finally, pick things that meet the musical needs and abilities of your particular parish.   However, there's another element here. I believe hymn singing has been in decline for decades, long before the call for new music became so strong. In fact, the decline in congregational singing may have well sparked the current trend to introduce lots of new music.   I find that organists these days don't adequately understand how to play hymns so that they can be sung easily and insightfully by their congregation. We have a great percentage of organists who can make it through any of the "8 Little Preludes and Fugues", a slow movement from a Mendelssohn Sonata or the Widor Toccata, but a shrinking percentage who really know how to lead a congregation.   I find it quite distressing when I hear an organist rush through hymns, using a tempo even their choir can't keep up with. Many times, people are gasping, because no hesitation or break is offered so that people can grab a breath, even at the end of verses. It's almost like the organist wants to show how fast they can play, daring the singers to keep up.   Then, there's the disregard for the hymn text. So much is being said by the poetry contained within the hymn, yet many organists simply hit a button and play, not knowing verse to verse what is being said.   However, the prelude and postlude are usually well worked out and played with skill and sensitivity.   I would suggest that this habit among organists is more detrimental to hymn singing than any new music which is being offered. If we spent even a fraction of the time on hymn playing that we spent with literature, our congregations would respond with inspired, powerful singing. As teachers, we need to instruct our students in the art of leading singing, not just "playing a hymn".   Mark       Mark Huth Rodgers Instruments, LLC mhuth@rodgers.rain.com http://www.rodgersinstruments.com   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D   Many of us would be better off financially if it weren't for the extravagance of our neighbors.     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: RE:choice couplers From: jeffrey korns <jakorns@worldnet.att.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 17:18:25 -0500   All of this talk about spoof stops and couplers reminds me of a slightly mean practicle joke I pulled on unsuspecting Freshman organ students in college. The college had a small pipe organ in its chapel that was also used for practicing. Prior to the pipe organ various electronic instruments had been used. I was given permission to scavange the old non working electronics for my own purposes. I took the headphone jack box and leslie control switch off of an old Baldwin and mounted it under the keydesk of the pipe organ next to the blower switch. My organ professor got a chuckle out of it. Needless to say some of the new organ students tried to figure out how to make the headphone jack work! Jeff Korns   PS. That same Baldwin later yielded a multi position switch which wound up on the console as an "Elevator up / down / and Rotate" switch - All "additions" were added with a small amount of double sided tape which did not damage the console when removed.  
(back) Subject: Residence organ From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 20:18:17 -0500   Dear People,   This is the greatest place to ask questions! So here goes another... Currently here at Vassar College, this weekend, is a meeting and lecture series of the American Musical Instrument Society. Vassar houses a noteworthy collection of instruments as well as several pipe organs, which will all be part of the activities.   Anyhow, the presiding member told me next year they will hold a convention in the Chicago area, during which they wish the visit the incredible = Jasper San Fillippe(sp?) residence Wurlitzer. Does any one know who the curator = is and who to speak to about arranging a visit? Any help would be greatly appreciated.   Thanks in advance   John V      
(back) Subject: New Organ at Vassar College From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 20:24:21 -0500   The rumor has been confirmed!   Vassar College has two Gress-Miles Organs. One is the chapel organ and a smaller one lives in the Skinner recital Hall. The smaller one apparently never quite sounded "right" in there, so it will be replaced by a copy of = a baroque organ. I don't know any further details yet but will pass them on as they become available. If any one has Alan Laufman's ear (Organ = Clearing House) this might be interesting to pass on to him.   John V