PipeChat Digest #932 - Friday, June 18, 1999
 
Re: hymn-playing, etc.
  by "Robert Horton" <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU>
Re: Happy Clappy vs. Frozen Chosen
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
TO LIST OWNER
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: TO LIST OWNER
  by "PipeChat-Admin" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: TO LIST OWNER
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: hymn-playing, etc.
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church.
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
the liturgy at St. Matthew's Church
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: hymn-playing, etc.
  by "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com>
Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church.
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
Re: virtuosic hymn-playing, etc.
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church.
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
Fw: Frozen Chosen" vs. "Happy Clappy
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Good Morning America (x-post)
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc. From: Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 11:27:51 -0600   This is what I love about being an organist...We have so many issues to discuss! :-)   Bud Clark wrote: >That's PRECISELY what I mean. What's the difference between a hymn and a = Bach >chorale?   Well, let's see... 1. Hymn-playing is actually a form of transcription. 2. Hymn-playing requires some serious compositional skills such as = theory, counterpoint, voice-leading, etc...in order to put together reharmonizations. 3. You have a mob of amateurs singing along with you while playing hymns...and YOU are supposed to take charge. 4. Hymn-playing requires many more registration changes. 5. There are very few set-in-stone rules involved in hymn-playing...local idiosyncrasies, oral tradition, and "le bon gout" tend to trump = everything. 6. No other musician has to deal with so many distractions during = performance. 7. And then there's the issue of improvisation...   The point that I'm trying to make is that there is much, much more to effective hymn-playing than simply "getting all the notes."   > Even Fenner Douglass found it useful to teach >voice-leading from the 1940 Hymnal. I teach beginning literature at the = same >time, to be sure, but there's ALWAYS a hymn. Wonderful, however I'm in no hurry to get my students to start hymns. I won't even attempt to teach service playing while we're still working on very basic issues of coordination.   >No, but it also owns the JOBS. I know it's somewhat fashionable to be >anti-church on these lists... I'm not being anti-church...quite the contrary, I'm being very PRO-church. I want nothing more than to see the standard of hymn-playing raised.   >A concert organist who can't play hymns and/or the liturgy >is worse than useless in church (and many can't). As is someone who has never ventured up past middle G on the pedal board! As is someone who doesn't know a Chamade from a Chalumeau! While I can think of a handful of concert organists that make flops as service players...there are thousands of half-trained organists who are just "getting by" in church. I think the latter is the greater ill, and = in some cases a terrible embarassment to our profession. Has anyone stopped to wonder why traditional hymnody has gone "the way of the dodo"? The usual congregational response in the 90s is that "...those old hymns are boring." Well, I say that there is no such thing as a boring hymn (except possibly "Majesty" ;-) only boring and uninspired realizations by organists that are undertrained and underpaid.   > And, I might add, that >distinction is a relatively recent one. Franck, Tournemire, Langlais, = Dupre, >Noble, Willan, Heiller, Marchal, etc. etc. etc. were CHURCH organists who = also >composed and concertized, not the other way around. Dupre played two >Masses the >Sunday he died. And before he went to church that morning, he did his piano scales.   It's hard to proove that these folks were church organists first, who then also did composition and concert-work. The parish organists of "le Grand Siecle" were most definitely secular musicians who had their fun during the appropriate times of worship. The only big name that strikes = me as a pure church musician who also did secular work is Olivier Messiaen   >> Simply put, you've got to be a musician before you can be = called to >> be a church musician, we all know what happens otherwise. >Don't see the distinction ... I've ALWAYS been both, from the beginning. = I >think it's the attempt to SEPARATE it that causes the problem. I'm not trying to separate anything. I'm trying to put things in their proper order. Service-playing is one of our most important jobs, = and without rock-solid knowledge of the instrument it can only be approached = on a superficial level. Why give students a watered down view of = hymn-playing when they're not ready? Why not delay the introduction of service-playing until the students are ready to handle the "real deal"?   > Oberlin had NO >service-playing courses; Cincinnati had one. Well, rest assured that all of this is changing very quickly at the university level. However, my concern is more for beginning students than university folks.   Cheers, Rob      
(back) Subject: Re: Happy Clappy vs. Frozen Chosen From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 12:42:37 -0400   >From: WAYNE_BURCHAM@RSAUSA.COM >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: Happy Clappy vs. Frozen Chosen >Date: Fri, Jun 18, 1999, 11:58 AM   > Is it just me, or has everything that can possibly be said about the = above > referenced subject been said already?   At least twice. If it's "just" you, it's "just" me too.   Alan  
(back) Subject: TO LIST OWNER From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 09:45:00 -0700   How do I set my e-mail so as not to receive further postings from Bruce Cornely? My faith and the practices of my church are not so fragile that they cannot bear civilised DISCUSSION, but there IS a limit.   Bud Clark    
(back) Subject: Re: TO LIST OWNER From: PipeChat-Admin <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 10:02:01 -0700   At 09:45 AM 06/18/1999 -0700, you wrote: >How do I set my e-mail so as not to receive further postings from Bruce >Cornely? My faith and the practices of my church are not so fragile that >they cannot bear civilised DISCUSSION, but there IS a limit. > >Bud Clark   Hi Bud,   It al depends on what email software you are using. If you are using Netscape, I am not sure if it handles filters, proabably not. I would suyggest that you obtain either Eudora Pro and Eudora Lite (free) -- Pro costs around $40.00 -- or some similar software that allows you to set up filters. Then you filter the message as it is comeing in, giving the persons email address as instructions to the program to filter it out, and then delete the message. It then sends the message automatically to the trashcan. It is a very powerful program, and the one that I use.   Otherwise, just use the delete key and delete his messages before reading them.   Hope the helps,   Pete!   Dr. Peter Pocock Co-Owner and Administrator, PipeChat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: TO LIST OWNER From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 13:12:11 -0400   At 09:45 AM 6/18/99 -0700, you wrote: >How do I set my e-mail so as not to receive further postings from Bruce >Cornely? My faith and the practices of my church are not so fragile that >they cannot bear civilised DISCUSSION, but there IS a limit. > >Bud Clark   Bud,   It is quite simple if you are using Eudora. Go to the "Tools" drop down menu, then click on "Filters" and follow the instructions from there. - But follow them explicitly, or the filter will never work! (See my tag line below!)   I don't know about other mail programmes, but Eudora is easy to set up for most thigs you might want to do!   Bob Conway ... "Learn from the mistakes of others. You cannot live long enough to make them all yourself."          
(back) Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc. From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 12:56:42 -0400   Perhaps you would be so kind as to tell me what on earth you are talking about? Hymns ---registration changes? Counterpoint? Composing? Amateurs? Apparently you're not using the same book I am. All the hymnbooks I have ever seen have all the hymns written out in 4 part --I think it's called Scottish square --harmony. And I had better = play exactly what's written, or I get complaints. No interludes, no fancy = stuff, no improvisations, nothing added, nothing taken away. They want it appropriate, meaningful, up to proper speed, loud enough = to follow all four parts, and sing Amen at the end if it's printed in the = book. Period. 3 hymns every week, and there are usually 4 verses, a few have one = more or less. I also do a prelude and postlude, and most of the year the choir = does an anthem and either the choir or I do an offertory, plus I do some responses. We've been doing Sweet Sweet Spirit for years, and the = Doxology, both every week. There are no distractions, no hymn improvisations. If somebody takes = a child out to quiet them down, or somebody walks quietly out for another purpose, it doesn't bother me any. That's life. Lots of different things come along. Sometimes the children sing, sometimes the choir does something special, sometimes we have a musician guest or group, it's all part of the worship service. What exactly is it that you are expected to do? I know you say that = you have to write music every week, what are you writing? Diane S. (straight@infoblvd.net)    
(back) Subject: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church. From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 18:29:22 +0100   Something in your post has irritated me   Speaking as a half-trained organist who just "gets by" in Church I would like to express the opinion that half-trained organists who just get by in Church do a very great deal to make sure that many Churches who could not obtain the services of a professional organist due either to lack of funds or availability can at least have the services of a half-trained organist who just gets by in church.   Half-trained Organists who just get by in Church are NOT a reflection upon your "profession" as we are not a part of the "profession' and most of us are not desirous to become part of your profession. We do what we = do either for fun or as Christian Service; we are often not paid, or paid simply a small sum to cover our expenses.   We are not professional organists.   We are half-trained organists who just get by in Church.   grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!!!!   Mark Checkley Director of Music Belbroughton Parish Church Worcestershire England. Age :46. Highest musical qualification: Associated Board Grade 3 Piano - 1964.     -----Original Message----- From: Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, June 18, 1999 05:27 Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc.     >This is what I love about being an organist...We have so many issues to >discuss! :-) > >Bud Clark wrote: >>That's PRECISELY what I mean. What's the difference between a hymn and a Bach >>chorale? > >Well, let's see... >1. Hymn-playing is actually a form of transcription. >2. Hymn-playing requires some serious compositional skills such as = theory, >counterpoint, voice-leading, etc...in order to put together >reharmonizations. >3. You have a mob of amateurs singing along with you while playing >hymns...and YOU are supposed to take charge. >4. Hymn-playing requires many more registration changes. >5. There are very few set-in-stone rules involved in = hymn-playing...local >idiosyncrasies, oral tradition, and "le bon gout" tend to trump = everything. >6. No other musician has to deal with so many distractions during performance. >7. And then there's the issue of improvisation... > > The point that I'm trying to make is that there is much, much more >to effective hymn-playing than simply "getting all the notes." > >> Even Fenner Douglass found it useful to teach >>voice-leading from the 1940 Hymnal. I teach beginning literature at the same >>time, to be sure, but there's ALWAYS a hymn. > Wonderful, however I'm in no hurry to get my students to start >hymns. I won't even attempt to teach service playing while we're still >working on very basic issues of coordination. > >>No, but it also owns the JOBS. I know it's somewhat fashionable to be >>anti-church on these lists... > I'm not being anti-church...quite the contrary, I'm being very >PRO-church. I want nothing more than to see the standard of hymn-playing >raised. > >>A concert organist who can't play hymns and/or the liturgy >>is worse than useless in church (and many can't). > As is someone who has never ventured up past middle G on the pedal >board! As is someone who doesn't know a Chamade from a Chalumeau! > While I can think of a handful of concert organists that make flops >as service players...there are thousands of half-trained organists who = are >just "getting by" in church. I think the latter is the greater ill, and = in >some cases a terrible embarassment to our profession. > Has anyone stopped to wonder why traditional hymnody has gone "the >way of the dodo"? The usual congregational response in the 90s is that >"...those old hymns are boring." Well, I say that there is no such thing >as a boring hymn (except possibly "Majesty" ;-) only boring and = uninspired >realizations by organists that are undertrained and underpaid. > >> And, I might add, that >>distinction is a relatively recent one. Franck, Tournemire, Langlais, Dupre, >>Noble, Willan, Heiller, Marchal, etc. etc. etc. were CHURCH organists = who also >>composed and concertized, not the other way around. Dupre played two >>Masses the >>Sunday he died. >And before he went to church that morning, he did his piano scales. > > It's hard to proove that these folks were church organists first, >who then also did composition and concert-work. The parish organists of >"le Grand Siecle" were most definitely secular musicians who had their = fun >during the appropriate times of worship. The only big name that strikes = me >as a pure church musician who also did secular work is Olivier Messiaen > >>> Simply put, you've got to be a musician before you can be = called to >>> be a church musician, we all know what happens otherwise. >>Don't see the distinction ... I've ALWAYS been both, from the beginning. = I >>think it's the attempt to SEPARATE it that causes the problem. > I'm not trying to separate anything. I'm trying to put things in >their proper order. Service-playing is one of our most important jobs, = and >without rock-solid knowledge of the instrument it can only be approached = on >a superficial level. Why give students a watered down view of = hymn-playing >when they're not ready? Why not delay the introduction of = service-playing >until the students are ready to handle the "real deal"? > >> Oberlin had NO >>service-playing courses; Cincinnati had one. > Well, rest assured that all of this is changing very quickly at the >university level. However, my concern is more for beginning students = than >university folks. > >Cheers, >Rob > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: the liturgy at St. Matthew's Church From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 10:41:56 -0700   First of all, to lay to rest any misconceptions, the liturgy at St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church is immutable, except in small non-essential details. It is the Anglican/Tridentine Mass of the now-discarded 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the American Cowley Fathers' Altar Missal.   Having said THAT ... yes, we DO rewrite the Minor Propers so that they agree with the one-year Lectionary, particularly in green seasons. We also shortened the Easter Vigil service this past Holy Week from 3 1/2 hours to 2 hours, mostly by shortening the readings.   We are NOT bound by RC time constraints ... the typical Sunday High Mass takes a leisurely one hour and twenty minutes to one hour and thirty minutes. And the Rector, Father Scarlett, could care LESS how long most things last ... Introit, Gradual, Anthem, Communion, etc. If he finishes what he's doing before we do, he either stands at the altar and prays, or, if it's a congregational piece and/or a chant that he knows, he sings along with us.   As I indicated in earlier posts about Holy Week, this parish has a custom that was well-established BEFORE I came on scene: if an action is completed before the music accompanying it (Holy Communion, Stripping the Altar, Veneration of the Cross, etc.), the Sacred Ministers and congregation kneel down and pray the rest of the text with the choir.   The Anglican/Tridentine Mass is a missa mixtum compositum ... the Prayer Book overlaid with some of the Tridentine texts and ceremonial, or, the other way around, if you prefer. The practical result is that there ARE some duplications:   Processional Hymn PLUS Introit Communion Chant PLUS Communion Hymn   etc.   This discussion started out with the simple statement that Hyfrydol set to the "Alleluia! Sing To Jesus" text was simply TOO long for use as a processional hymn in our small church in the particular context of OUR liturgy. I have nothing against Hyfrydol OR "Alleluia! Sing To Jesus", but to put it at the beginning of the liturgy makes a rather long, indigestible "chunk" to be gotten through.   The Anglican/Tridentine Mass starts quietly ... the first thing the congregation hears is the Collect For Purity: "Almighty God, unto whom all hearts are open, all desires known", etc., so I try to choose processional hymns that are rather solemn and not too boisterous so there isn't a great psychological "drop" from the processional hymn to the opening Collect. We're even considering moving the Gloria in excelsis back to its old Prayer Book location after communion so that the Gospel stands out in higher relief as the climax of the Liturgy of the Word ... stay tuned on that one.   So ... we THINK about these things. Nothing is done willy-nilly, and I am ALWAYS involved in the discussions, along with the Rector, Deacon, Master of Ceremonies, Choir, Altar Guild, etc.   Oops! Gotta go practice with the soloist for Sunday. More later.   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc. From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 18:39:50 +0100   I think that the original contributor fell into that category of organists who - rather like many accountants - would like Churches who only require sensible, tidy, basic music that requires only basic skills and common sense, to actually feel that they somehow OUGHT to be MADE to EMPLOY someone with VAST (but unnecessary in the context) technical skills (like himself) and PAY accordingly.   Mark Checkley.   -----Original Message----- From: STRAIGHT <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, June 18, 1999 06:24 Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc.     >Perhaps you would be so kind as to tell me what on earth you are talking >about? > Hymns ---registration changes? Counterpoint? Composing? Amateurs? >Apparently you're not using the same book I am. > All the hymnbooks I have ever seen have all the hymns written out in = 4 >part --I think it's called Scottish square --harmony. And I had better play >exactly what's written, or I get complaints. No interludes, no fancy stuff, >no improvisations, nothing added, nothing taken away. > They want it appropriate, meaningful, up to proper speed, loud enough to >follow all four parts, and sing Amen at the end if it's printed in the book. >Period. > 3 hymns every week, and there are usually 4 verses, a few have one = more >or less. > I also do a prelude and postlude, and most of the year the choir = does >an anthem and either the choir or I do an offertory, plus I do some >responses. We've been doing Sweet Sweet Spirit for years, and the Doxology, >both every week. > There are no distractions, no hymn improvisations. If somebody takes = a >child out to quiet them down, or somebody walks quietly out for another >purpose, it doesn't bother me any. That's life. > Lots of different things come along. Sometimes the children sing, >sometimes the choir does something special, sometimes we have a musician >guest or group, it's all part of the worship service. > What exactly is it that you are expected to do? I know you say that you >have to write music every week, what are you writing? >Diane S. >(straight@infoblvd.net) > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church. From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 13:09:04 -0500   Mark Checkley wrote:   > Half-trained Organists who just get by in Church are NOT a reflection > upon your "profession" as we are not a part of the "profession' and most > of us are not desirous to become part of your profession. We do what we = do > either for fun or as Christian Service; we are often not paid, or paid > simply a small sum to cover our expenses. > > We are not professional organists. > > We are half-trained organists who just get by in Church.   Mark; Well-spoken! My aim, in all workshops I attend - and all that I present - = is to focus on the "half-trained organists who just get by" and for those = wonderful volunteers who really prefer the piano but are "filling in" for years and = years because nobody else can do the job.   There is PLENTY of excellent music being published that is easy to learn, = easy to play, and a joy to listen to. A big part of the problem is that many = of us out in the "boondocks" don't know what it is or where it is...couple that = with the near-complete lack of anyone who can (or who will) teach organ so = those volunteers can improve their skills, it's little wonder that our church = music programs are suffering so.   You don't have to be concert-level organists, or great improvisers, or = great sight-readers, or learn nothing but Bach, Buxtehude, and all the other = classical works - while some churches use that kind of literature, in my part of the country it would be highly inappropriate (although I do work in an = occasional JSB chorale prelude).   I applaud the efforts of all the "half-trained" organists out there (and I probably should include myself in that group...I play competently enough = and do an occasional recital, but I don't consider myself a concert-level = organist by any means...as I say on many occasions, I'm just trying to do the very = best I can with what I have to work with!).   Rod Murrow    
(back) Subject: Re: virtuosic hymn-playing, etc. From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 14:15:26 -0400   >From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: hymn-playing, etc. >Date: Fri, Jun 18, 1999, 12:56 PM   > no improvisations   Hi, Diane!   It sounds to me like you're doing a regular job quite decently.   But "no improvisations"? You certainly don't have to have any, nor even = any composed varied accompaniments. But it is pretty standard procedure among many organists nowadays to have at least the latter, if not the former. I think part of your job COULD be construed as "making hymn-singing a lot of fun," too--and the easiest way to do that is with alternative = harmonizations of various kinds, written by lots of good church organists and composers, published by the standard church publishing houses. And perhaps an occasional modulation up a semitone or two for the final stanza--or = perhaps just an interlude without modulating. It makes for really exciting hymn-singing. I recommend it to you. (You'll get complaints; Bach did. But you'll get delighted compliments too!)   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church. From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 13:36:48 -0500   > Mark Checkley wrote: > > > Half-trained Organists who just get by in Church are NOT a reflection > > upon your "profession" as we are not a part of the "profession' and = most > > of us are not desirous to become part of your profession. We do what = we do > > either for fun or as Christian Service; we are often not paid, or paid > > simply a small sum to cover our expenses. > > > > We are not professional organists. > > > > We are half-trained organists who just get by in Church.   I left my previous reply lacking one other thought - methinks that the "half-trained" among us are doing incredible work, as long as we are = making efforts to improve our skills, find good music, and do credible work in the = Service. How could one be in such a position and not make those kinds of efforts?   What I can't abide, though, are those who are doing less-than-credible = (read "unsatisfactory") work and are completely satisfied with it...and will do = nothing to improve their skills.   In a previous position as Director of Music, I asked the organist if her = job description included adequate hours for practicing (or if that was to be = one on her own time) - her response was that she "had the time to practice, but = choooses not to" - and fed the church a steady diet of Lorenz "Church Organist" = publications, played very, very poorly. She's no longer on the organ bench - I replaced = her. She had $$ in the budget for continuing education - and attended ONE workshop, = only because I literally forced her to. The only $$ from her music budget that = was ever used was to pay her Lorenz subscription. She was one who could have = benefitted from some of the easier music that's available - but she didn't care enough to = learn what's available...sad, sad. My hope is that people like that will give = up the job to someone who will make a serious effort!   Rod Murrow    
(back) Subject: Fw: Frozen Chosen" vs. "Happy Clappy From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 13:36:45 -0500   I agree...I'm used to the formal Catholic worship with no show-biz thrown in.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, June 18, 1999 11:23 AM Subject: Re: Frozen Chosen" vs. "Happy Clappy     >Mark Checkley wrote: > >> I have several times heard traditional worship condemned >> as "meaningless" or worse by happy-clappyists. I cannot >> recall contemporary worship being criticised by >> traditionalists in any stronger terminology than ":It's not what >> I prefer, but each to his own". > >Mark; >I have a constant clamp on my tongue. The reason you don't hear from me = on >the subject is because my comments would only start a flame-war. Some >issues will never be resolved to everybody's complete satisfaction. I = just >know that I'm in a "traditional" Presbyterian church and love it - = although >we do sing - and I do play - lots of contemporary music (contemporaries like >Callahan, Burkhardt, Manz, Wood, Cherwien, and a host of others). > >The happy-clappy camp, in my opinion, don't really understand the concept of >worship - I think it's a mark of our "feel-good" and "instant gratification" >society. There needs to be constant education about what is and is not >appropriate for worship. I can't abide the "Be-bop-a-Jesus" hoopla. To = me, >it's a complete mockery of worship. > >With that, let the flames begin! > >Rod Murrow > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Good Morning America (x-post) From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 14:53:13 EDT   This morning on (I think) Good Morning America there was a segment from (I =   think) Sacramento about some festival and old movies and there was a gentleman playing a (presumably electronique) theatre organ. Any one have any details? Dudel