PipeChat Digest #948 - Sunday, June 20, 1999
 
Many "happy" notes...
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
consolidating
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
training of organists
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
THE BIG PICTURE!!! Everyone please read!
  by "PipeChat-Admin" <admin@pipechat.org>
Mark's question (x-posted)
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church.
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: volunteer vs paid organists
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Language and attitudes
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Many "happy" notes...
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: ADMINISTRATION POST - PLEASE READ
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Many "happy" notes... X-Posted
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: volunteer vs paid organists
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Crystal Cathedral on Astra
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church.
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@hit.net>
Re: Many "happy" notes...
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: THE BIG PICTURE!!! Everyone please read!
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Many "happy" notes... From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 17:30:05 -0500   Good Afternoon, fellow Chatters!   It is my distinct pleasure to attempt to offer a report of what was in all probability the FINEST organ recital ever held here in Little Rock. = Please bear in mind that the opinions offered are mine and mine alone, as a lover of the organ and it's music.   On Thursday evening last, Professor Thomas Murray performed at Christ Episcopal Church in downtown Little Rock to an appreciative audience of music lovers. The concert was a part of the Wildwood Festival for the Performing Arts; an annual event which includes many and various opportunities for enjoyment of music, theatre, visual arts, and more. The theme of this year's Festival related to New Orleans and their French influences -- thus we were treated to a recital of French organ music. = The organ at Christ Church is ideally suited to this repertoire, and Prof. Murray used it accordingly. (info about the organ may be found at <http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com>.)   The recital began with the "Grand Choeur Dialogue" of Eugene Gigout -- a familiar work to organ affecionados, and a rollicking start to the = evening. Prof. Murray delivered a stunning rendition, and the Bombardes of the organ were used to their full effect, as well as the various other reed choruses. I was left a bit breathless by the end of the piece -- a situation that would recur through the rest of the evening.   Next came the "Premiere and Deuxieme Arabesques" by Debussy -- transcriptions of works written originally for the piano. We heard numerous delightful combinations of the flutes of the organ, as well as various color reeds. What fun. I think Debussy would have approved.   The "Fantasie in D-Flat (op 101)" by Saint-Saens was next on the program. The piece is decidedly "symphonic" in nature, and Prof. Murray's performance indeed demonstrated those qualities of the organ -- the = strings and celestes, various reed colors, and the overall expressive capabilities of the instrument. The music did in fact seem to be alive as the piece ebbed and flowed to it's ultimate conclusion.   Franck's "Chorale #3 in A minor" is another work which is replete with opportunities to show the many colors and textures of the pipe organ. Professor Murray did not disappoint -- the piece was delivered in what seemed to be an effortless manner, all the while displaying an apparent endless stream of combinations of tone. I particularly enjoyed watching the registration changes being made through this piece -- he made it = appear as though he'd played this organ all his life, as he added and retired stops here and there. (in fact, he arrived about 24 hrs in advance...)   To close the first half of the program, we were given two movements from Henri Mulet's "Byzantine Sketches" -- the "Noel", and "Toccata: Tu es petra". The first is a charming little work which allowed yet another opportunity to show more of the quieter voices of the instrument; the second, (as many already know) is simply a "tour de force" which was played with amazing authority. Again, Prof. Murray made what is in actuality a demanding piece of music seem effortless to play. As the Toccata drew to its climax, I found myself literally on the edge of the = pew -- apparently I was not alone, as the audience responded with VERY enthusiastic applause and a standing ovation. (at INTERMISSION, mind you -- a first for a Little Rock recital audience, to my knowledge) The break was well timed -- I, for one, needed a few moments to breathe and re-compose myself by that point.   After the respite, we were treated with an unpublished piece entitled "Mouvement" by Jean Berveiller. I had never heard of it -- (no surprise there...) but was absolutely amazed by what developed. Professor Murray told us a bit of the history of the work, and included a bit of 'trivia' about it: the piece contains 468 pedal notes in it's 2 1/2 minute duration. Needless to say, it was a delight to watch, as well as to hear. How fortunate that the console was in full view of the audience.   The final work on the program would be considered by some to be one of the most challenging works for organ. The "Suite, opus 5" by Maurice Durufle was presented in its entirety, with all the requisite 'moods' it contains. What a musical journey it was -- up, down, back, forth, and every other direction one can take a pipe organ; again, played in such a fashion as = to make it appear absolutely effortless. In this work, it was also most obvious that Prof. Murray not only played the organ -- he also played the 'room'. Christ Church is blessed with a fine acoustic, which was expertly utilized along with the instrument itself. I can't begin to accurately describe the overall effect -- but by the conclusion of the "Toccata" I = was again quite out of breath. A truly fitting conclusion to an absolutely outstanding concert.   After another standing ovation and several "curtain calls", we were all delighted (and amused!) to receive an encore selection. This brief and bubbly little number (by Bach) was chosen by Prof. Murray especially to recognize the hospitality of Wayne Simpson, one of the builders of the Christ Church organ. It seems as though Mr. Simpson's cellular phone has been programmed to play the same tune when it rings...a few of us almost fell on the floor when Professor Murray started to play it. (I regret = that I don't know the exact title of the piece, but will never think of cellphones in the same light again!!)   In conclusion I offer a word of advice: If any of you ever have the opportunity to hear Thomas Murray perform, DON'T MISS IT!! Precious few people in the world can do what he does, as well as he does it. We in Little Rock are truly blessed to have had that opportunity. Those of us that were there will not soon forget it.   Respectfully reported,   Tim Bovard Little Rock, AR <tmbovard@arkansas.net>                
(back) Subject: consolidating From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 18:01:37 -0500   Bill... Your remark...+ACI-All four churches (different denominations) = work together...+ACI- reminds me of Rushville, IN. where ALL the churches get together once a = year to put on a wonderful choral program accompanied with pipe organ. Every year, the event is sponsored by a different church and many choir members from these churches meld together in one praising voice. The wrench in the works is, one church (denomination) in town refuses to participate. Oh = well, their loss.   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net        
(back) Subject: training of organists From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 18:44:15 -0500   Fortunately, at our country church, there are a few youngsters (teens) who play piano. I'm sure these few will be groomed to eventually play the = Mighty Wicks after the elderly organist retires. With proper supervision, there is good potential for future music in our church.   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net        
(back) Subject: THE BIG PICTURE!!! Everyone please read! From: PipeChat-Admin <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 16:43:03 -0700   Hi everyone,   As some of you know, for the past year or so I have looked at the list = from a distance, due to other pressures in my life I have been taking a well-earned back seat in the running of the list, and only stepping in = when needed. David, has done an incredible of job of running PipeChat, and dealing with the problems that come up from time to time, in addition to providing all of the services to us free. Yes there are costs involved in running such a list, and they are not small, and you are not charged for any of it. Something we should all be grateful for.   Ways back when PipeChat was first started, in October of 1996, we set a series of rules and guidelines for membership(see our website at http://www.pipechat.org). These rules were created, and have been added to, and in some cases slightly changed, for very good reasons . . . the most important of which are to keep everyone on an even keel, being kind = to one another, and respecting one another. In the history of PipeChat there have only been three occasions (that I recall) where things have reached a point where severe action has been necessary by the owners to remove someone and then also to ban them permanently from the list.   There has also been some criticism of the owners for not acting quick enough to solve the problems. To put it bluntly, you are damned if you = do, and you are damned if you don't. If you act to quickly, then there is heavy criticism, especially from those of us who live in the US, that free speach is being denied--or that you are being a control freak about postings. If we choose to wait longer in the hope that things will = quieten down and you will all solve the problems amongst yourselves and it gets = out of hand, then you are also up for major criticism, or people just decide = to leave. So, what do you do? All you can do is follow your past experience and your instinct, watch things carefully, send some private notes to = cease and desist, and then hope that it does not go any further. Most times it doesn't very occasionally it does!     Responsibility also rests with the members. We (David and me) are not = able to read every single posting that goes to the list, neither of us have the time. David runs a business, I run the music program of a large church, Conduct a Master Chorale, and many other things. Yes, we do have a life other than PipeChat. In our guidelines, we state to "be kind to one another." Yep, pretty powerful words, if they are truly taken on board. = I interpret that to mean-- "Would I like to receive the email I have just drafted in response to someone elses note!" or "Should I react to this email, or let it go!" (unfortunately, some do choose to react). Disagreement, as long as it is handled with respect, is healthy, as soon = as the respect goes out the window, bang, flames happen. Just because = someone has an opinion that is different to yours, does not mean to say that they are the enemy or indeed that they are worng, listen to them, you just = might learn something.   I sit on many different committees (church, community, Master Chorale Board, AGO (at end of term), committees in relation to the arts in our community run by the city, the list goes on and on, and I have also just been elected National President of the Choral Conductors Guild. One of = the things that happens in Committees is people come in with agendas, things that they want to see happen, usually to their own benefit. It is interesting that the committees that work incredibly well, do so when people put aside their own agendas and start to listen to the others = around the room and look for what they have in common. Then and only them do the committees finally speak with one voice. No, not everyone has achieved entirely what they wanted, but most have, once they have seen the BIG PICTURE, they realize, that they can live with the final outcome.   On PipeChat, the BIG PICTURE is to help one another, to connect with one another, to mentor, to learn from one another, to enjoy your presence here and to have fun. Lets all work on the BIG PICTURE, and in doing so, do as the vast majority of you have done in the past, help, mentor, sympathize, laugh, and even cry at times. Not everyone will agree, nor should they, however, remember our Golden Rule (IN BIG TYPE - doesn't that mean I am yelling -- apologies if I am :):):) BE KIND TO ONE ANOTHER!!!!!! The rest is a fruit of the big picture.   Blessings to each of you, and thanks for being a part of this great Internet forum.   Now back to chatting on 'Pipe/Digital/Electronic Organs and Related Topics!!!!'   Pete!   Dr. Peter Pocock Co-Owner, PipeChat.org      
(back) Subject: Mark's question (x-posted) From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 18:16:58 -0700   I'm x-posting this because the Net's being funky this afternoon, and/or OneList is down for maintenance.   Mark's comment about soft-pedalling the religious aspects of choir singing in order to recruit kids drew some strong reactions. After further explanation, I "got" what he was driving at, but I commented that circumstances are VERY different here in the U.S. (at least in my experience). He asked me to explain how, so here goes:   In churches of my experience, we seldom if ever had to go outside the Parish for kids.   Cases in point:   St. Paul's Episcopal, Winter Haven, FL - children's choir sang the 9:15 a.m. Family Mass - parish of 600 communicants, choir of about 30 kids (as much as the stalls would hold!), ages 3rd or 4th grade (8 or 9) through a couple of high school senior girls who acted as "Head Girls", passed out the music, served the refreshments after rehearsals, helped with discipline (I was only a senior in high school at the time!), etc. .... but they most definitely SANG as well. Seldom sang with the Adult Choir at the High Mass ... no place to put 'em!   More girls than boys, as is usual with a mixed children's choir in the U.S., but a healthy number of STRONG boy sopranos including FIVE from one Greek family who attended St. Paul's because there was no Greek church in Winter Haven. They came the closest to "outsiders", and of course they weren't ... parents were involved in EVERYTHING in the parish.   No need to consider the religious aspects here; they were already in place ... taught the kids the ritual aspects of choir-singing in the stalls as a matter of course: bowing, genuflecting, crossing, etc. Kids left for Sunday School after Communion, said the General Thanksgiving in their Sunday School classes; meantime Father Sturrup preached the sermon at the end of Mass.   Holy Rosary RC, Cleveland, OH - THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of communicants; parochial school; boy choir drawn from that. No further explication needed (grin). Nuns told 'em to sing; they SANG (grin).   All Saints' Episcopal, San Diego, CA - 1500 communicants; high school choir of about 30 (full stalls again!), drawn entirely from the Parish, sang the 9 a.m. Family Mass, then went to Sunday School while the priest preached, same as St. Paul's. Small building (seated only 300, no place to expand), three or four PACKED Masses every Sunday. Since fallen on evil days ... the Anglican fundies took the place over and ran everybody off ... maybe 50 people at the High Mass these days ... no choirs ... I had two.   A couple of points: with the polyglot makeup of the American religious scene, denominational ties, while fading somewhat, are still very strong. When I was growing up, we went to our own churches in the morning; then in the evening we went to whichever church had the best Youth Minister and youth program. But we went to our own churches FIRST.   Choir singers may parish-hop for the best music program WITHIN their own denomination ... my schola followed me around San Diego for twenty years .... but they seldom sing in churches of other denominations, except for the occasional choir festival, etc.   I imagine some of the non-denominational mega-churches adopt a "y'all come" approach to kids' choirs, but even there, it's bluntly a recruitment tool, and the kids ARE gonna be taught about Jesus and the Bible along with choir singing.   We have an "open" Vacation Bible School in the summer, but parents are required to sign a form stating that they UNDERSTAND and APPROVE of the fact that the kids are gonna be taught basic aspects of Anglican Christianity. We pick up one or two families a year from VBS.   We DO have a scattering of secular boychoirs across the country, and they're just that: secular; maybe the "St. Grottlesex Circuit" back East recruits non-Anglican boys, but I've never heard a discussion of having to "soft-pedal" the religious aspects in the recruitment process ... they sing in Anglican churches; they sing Mass and Evensong; when they're old enough to get confirmed, they get confirmed.   Something else that affects the process: the era of the territorial parish church is more-or-less over, at least in Southern California. Rare indeed is the priest whose entire flock lives within the sound of the bells. The average commute for a parishioner at St. Matthew's is 30-45 minutes, depending on the traffic. Even RCs, whose tradition of territorial parishes is MUCH stronger than American Anglicans, will drive long distances for a charismatic parish, a traditional parish, a Latin Mass, etc.   So ... for OUR people at St. Matthew's, there's a very STRONG loyalty TO ST. MATTHEW'S ... if their kids are gonna sing anywhere, they're gonna sing THERE. But we're up against that long commute ... haven't formed a kids' choir yet, but I've got BUCKETS of 1st and 2nd graders coming along, so I'm gonna have to do it in the next year or two.   Another point: church attendance in the U.S. is probably the highest in the world behind Poland and Ireland, particularly in the Deep South, where folks will ask a newcomer as a matter of course: "What church y'all go to?" And if you DON'T have a church, be prepared to get dragged to the questioner's next Sunday (grin). So the religious "ethos" is still much more accepted in U.S. life than I gather it is in British life. Oh, we fight a lot about religion in public life and separation of Church and State (a problem the Brits DON'T have), but something like 78% of Americans are practicing Christians of SOME flavour.   Bottom line: you sing in a Christian church, you're gonna hear the message, no apologies. And you KNOW that going IN.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church. From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 21:49:22 -0400 (EDT)   Here we go bashing folks again. Ray, every1 you mention is gifted in his/her medium. And most make more money at it then any of us will ever dream of making. You don't have to like a particular style, but others do -- plenty of others. Half-trained organists are no less held under the same scrutiny and constraints as those of us who are more trained. It is just that they, for whatever reason, have not availed themselves of the training that is available. Being an active member of my AGO chapter, and past dean, I have done my derndest to recruit these volunteer types into the chapter so that we can all grow together. Some do join, but most don't. These organists don't need our criticisms, they need our prayers and our support. My 2 cents worth on this topic. --Neil Brown, Barnegat, USA   (we're finally getting RAIN, yippeeee!!)    
(back) Subject: Re: volunteer vs paid organists From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 21:51:00 -0400 (EDT)   No, Bud, not Sacred Heart Cathedral. She's thriving beautifully, and is celebrating a major anniversary this year. The church to which I refer (I think it's St. Mary's) is in Elizabeth, NJ. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Language and attitudes From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 21:57:32 -0400 (EDT)   I simply cannot believe I saw "Cussing" on this list. Absolutely inexcusable. I hope I don't see it again or I will ask the list owners to unsubscribe the guilty party. There is a line which I simply will not cross over and I expect grown people to act the same. the "F" word is not acceptable here, by ANYONE's standard. If you cannot talk on here without getting angry, go to some other outlet. I"m not the list owner, and I'm glad I'm not. You'd be history, Mark.   --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Many "happy" notes... From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 21:00:24 -0400 (EDT)   Tom Bovard's review was indeed enjoyable to read, as the recital evidently was to hear.   However, if anyone in the future happens to be in a hurry to post a review of a recital played by Tom Murray, you may simply say:   "Tom Murray played a recital."   The rest is understood. I have never been disappointed, let down, or less than totally entertained and edified by his playing and performance. He is truly a master at the keyboard, the bench and the stage.   Yet another reason to be in OHS!!   Thanks again for the review!   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   Barking dogs don't bite, but they themselves don't know it. -- Shalom Aleichem    
(back) Subject: Re: ADMINISTRATION POST - PLEASE READ From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 22:19:25 -0400 (EDT)   AMEN, David. Prayers on your safe trip home. And, prayers for Mark that God will soften his heart so that he can be useful for the Kingdom. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Many "happy" notes... X-Posted From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 22:24:40 EDT   In a message dated 6/20/99 6:34:38 PM Eastern Daylight Time, tmbovard@arkansas.net writes:   << In conclusion I offer a word of advice: If any of you ever have the opportunity to hear Thomas Murray perform, DON'T MISS IT!! Precious few people in the world can do what he does, as well as he does it. We in Little Rock are truly blessed to have had that opportunity. Those of us that were there will not soon forget it. >>   I have been blessed in hearing Tom Murray play lots of times in lots of places, but most often at his "home organ," Woolsey Hall at Yale, which incredible instrument is like an extension of Tom and he of it. I was = driving south on business some years ago, and knew from the TAO calendar that Tom = was playing at the cathedral in Jacksonville, FL on a night that we could actually work into our travel schedule. Some of you may know this organ. = It is a very broad, orchestral, quite recent Austin, of a design encouraged = by the then incumbent organist. I don't recall the program, but I do remember =   after the considerable applause had finally died down at the end, Tom = saying "As you all know, no organ recital would be complete without at least one work of Fritz Kreisler," and then proceeding to play Liebesfreud, Schon Rosmarin, or one of those Kreisler chestnuts. The whole recital was wonderful, and the audience was totally connected to the music all the = way.   Tom dedicated our organ at Christ Church Cranbrook in Michigan. There were =   two recitals scheduled, one for the parish on the Sunday, and another for = the public on Monday evening. It's a long drive from here, so we set out = Sunday after church to get part way. On Monday, we arrived at the church about an =   hour before the recital was to begin. Success was in the air. The parking = lot was quite full, and there will still many cars coming in. We walked = through throngs of people waiting outside, and entered the a very atmospheric = church, bathed in candle light. It was beautiful, and there were various people bringing in even more candles. It was just a little while before we discovered that we were in the middle of a great power failure, covering a =   very wide area, and the power had been off for about half an hour. At = about 15 minutes to starting time, someone shouted from the chancel steps that = we would wait until about 15 minutes after starting time, and if the power = was not yet on, would proceed to the church hall, where a great feast and reception was waiting for us. If, during the reception, the power came on, = we would proceed to the church for the recital. The reception was almost = worth the trip (but not quite), and Tom was there greeting one and all. Finally, = at about 8:30, it was announced that someone had finally got through to = Detroit Edison, to learn that the power would be off for at least another 12 = hours. Tom was able to head for the bar, and a good time was had by all. We = finally headed south, to escape the morning Detroit rush, landing at the Ohio Turnpike at about midnight. Everyone said the Sunday recital was = magnificent. The Monday one was rescheduled for a month or so later, but we were not = able to be there. That is my sad tale of perhaps a record journey to hear a cancelled Tom Murray recital.   Thanks to Tim for his detailed report. It was almost like being there. I'm =   off to the AGO Region 1 Convention in Worcester next Sunday, and will try = to get back into review mode, and return the favor.   Malcolm Wechsler Mander Organs, Ltd. - U. S. A. www.mander-organs.com          
(back) Subject: Re: volunteer vs paid organists From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 22:26:31 -0400 (EDT)   >The organs were spared however -one was even moved across the street to a high school gym to escape the holocost.<   Pipe organs in gyms -- now THAT is a wedding of music and sport!! The wood floors ought to do wonders for the 16 footers!! --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Crystal Cathedral on Astra From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 22:32:58 -0400 (EDT)   >As the Sun Streames through the walls (It's ALL windows) the organ heats very unevenly and stops that are usable at 9 AM are hopeless at 11 AM.<   That would make sense. Maybe I'm glad there is no natural light in our chancel (where our organ is).    
(back) Subject: Re: Half-trained organists who juts get by in Church. From: Frank Johnson <usd465@hit.net> Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 21:41:57 -0500 (CDT)   > Being an active member of my AGO chapter, and past dean, I have done >my derndest to recruit these volunteer types into the chapter so that we >can all grow together. Some do join, but most don't. > These organists don't need our criticisms, they need our prayers and >our support. > My 2 cents worth on this topic. >--Neil Brown, Barnegat, USA > >(we're finally getting RAIN, yippeeee!!)     Here in Kansas we are praying for the RAIN to QUIT. You want some of ours?   Neil I really appreciate your attitude. I am a member of this list but don't post often. I am a theater organ buff, have a Hammond B2 (which I play some), have my own dixieland jazz band, play clarinet AND my wife = is an organist. She has studied organ both high school and as a graduate school. She has a degree in music eduction. She does a lot of accompanying on piano at the local Methodist college here. She = substitutes for the regular organist at our Methodist church (there are several in town). The organ is a 2/20 Reuter. The regular organist is not an organ major but plays very well. She knows her limitations and keeps that in mind when selecting music. My wife operates in the same manner. I think that is one key to organists sounding good. As a musician whose mother had degrees in both organ and piano, I do know what to look for in an organist. I've heard some who try to play beyond their capbilities and I think that is something that those organists who are not extremely proficient, should keep in mind. I know the local AGO would welcome those who are less experienced because I know most of the members. Thank you again for your input.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Re: Many "happy" notes... From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 23:01:20 -0400 (EDT)   Tim, I heard Prof. Murray play the Ocean Grove Organ here in NJ last summer and will hear him play in Worcester next week for the Region I AGO convention. I cannot wait. Few people play with as much alacrity and elan as he. He is in command of every instrument he touches. --Neil, Barnegat, USA    
(back) Subject: Re: THE BIG PICTURE!!! Everyone please read! From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 23:05:58 -0400 (EDT)   There's life outside of PipeChat? --Neil