PipeChat Digest #826 - Tuesday, May 4, 1999
 
Fwd: Magnets
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: oldies and goodies--Part III
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Lighted stops
  by "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au>
Re: Horror story...(water damage to pipe organs)
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: Lighted stops
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
French Baroque Organ...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: oldies and goodies--Part III
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: oldies and goodies--Part III
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: more on consoles, etc.
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: The organ: King of Instruments...
  by "rollin smith" <rollinsmithv@worldnet.att.net>
Re: birthdays
  by "rollin smith" <rollinsmithv@worldnet.att.net>
Re: more on consoles, etc.
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: more on consoles, etc.
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
more on consoles, etc.
  by "arpncorn" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
Console Layout / Design
  by "Mr. Jan VanDerStad" <dcob@nac.net>
Edward Elgar...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Max Drischner...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
trompettes en chamade....
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Fw: trompettes en chamade....
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
anyone out there???
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
organ dedication
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: anyone out there???
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
when is a pipe organ not a pipe organ
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: when is a pipe organ not a pipe organ
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
Re: just curious...........
  by <MWORGLBAU@aol.com>
Re: The organ: King of Instruments...
  by "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Fwd: Magnets From: Administrator <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 14:34:43 -0700   Hi everyone,   This query came from our webpage. If anyone can help Michael, would please reply to him PRIVATELY at "Michael L. McKeever" <mtah-mck@juno.com>   Thanks,   Pete!   To: admin@pipechat.org Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 17:02:32 -0400 From: "Michael L. McKeever" <mtah-mck@juno.com> Sender: <admin@pipechat.org>   Dear Admin for Pipe Chat,   I have never visited a chat room before and am not sure if this is the appropriate one for my inquiry? My name is Mike and I work for a pipe organ repair company that is in the mist of reconditioning a 1930 Midmer-Losh pipe organ. We have run into a stumbling block in that our normal supplier for Noterman magnets is unable to fullfill our request at this time. We would very much like to finish this project on time. The size magnets we are looking for are #8 - 3/8" exhaust. If there is anyone out there that has a stock pile of them (we are looking for about 100) they would be willing to seperate with it would be greatly appreciated. Any leads to where we might obtain some are also welcome.   Thank you for your time. Please let me know what I need to do.   Mike  
(back) Subject: Re: oldies and goodies--Part III From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 18:37:36 -0400   Hello Carlo et al!   I do believe most of the pieces on Lists I, II and III are transcriptions.   Let's make a list of "real" organ music! Shall we?   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea Fort Lauderdale, FL    
(back) Subject: Lighted stops From: Mark Quarmby <markq@flex.com.au> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 21:30:28 +1000   I am playing a Viscount in the Cathedral Chapter House while the cathedral is closed for restoration. It has lighted stops and pistons. These were OK until last Sunday when we had a special service in the afternoon. The sun had moved around so that a very strong beam of light lit me and the console up for half the service. I had no idea what stop or piston was on or off except for using my ears!   Mark        
(back) Subject: Re: Horror story...(water damage to pipe organs) From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 19:03:15 EDT     "Tossing a bucket of water into a running blower ??????????"       Hey Roc.   This very vocal expert who believes in tossing a bucket of water into a running blower, may very well end up picking shrapnel out of his ass and anyone else's standing nearby. Water is not compressible and has the initial effect of tossing a solid object into the fanwheel. The vanes on most early organ blowers are riveted to the fanwheel, and the shock of a slug of water can cause a vane to shear rivets and come loose with catastrophic results. I MEAN TOTAL DESTRUCTION OF THE BLOWER AND ANYTHING ELSE AROUND IT. Having worked at an electric generating facility for 24 years and doing vibration analysis and balancing on rotating machinery; I have seen what happens when a fan rotor disintegrates from excessive vibration as a result of loss of a blade tip. Believe me, you don't want to be nearby when this happens!!!!   This YOYO needs to be discouraged from doing this by whatever means are necessary, but just short of criminal.   Later, Phil L.  
(back) Subject: Re: Lighted stops From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 19:06:46 -0400 (EDT)   Excerpts from mail: 3-May-99 Lighted stops by Mark Quarmby@flex.com.au > It has lighted stops and pistons. > These were OK until last Sunday when we had a special service in the > afternoon. The sun had moved around so that a very strong beam of light > lit me and the console up for half the service. I had no idea what stop > or piston was on or off except for using my ears!   Ain't technology grand? Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: French Baroque Organ... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 18:55:33 EDT   Hey gang,   have any of you out there had the pleasure of playing a true french baroque organ? I have. Here in Montreal we have one, and it's an instrument of beauty. Built by the firm "Gilbault-Therien", it's housed in the Grand Seninary, here in Montreal. It has 3 manuals and pedal. To couple the bottom manual to the middle (positif to grand orgue), you must push on the keyboard, actually sliding it in under the great, so that the mechanisms lign-up, thus causing the choir to play simultaneously with the great. The pedalboard starts on the A and not the C, thus giving you the extra 3 notes. It's great for playing the music of composers such as D'Aquin, Balbastre and Dandrieu (composers who are considered to be 'french baroque'). The tuning is also different. One is not able to play in all major and minor keys. I found this out the hard way. I was playing a service there last year, and during the closing hymn, I modulated a semi-tone to play the final verse in a higher key...YUCK!!!!! It sounded flat (to say the least). It was after this terrible recessional hymn that the resident organist came up and explained to me what playing a true french baroque organ involves. You may modulate, but it must be a full-tone, not a semi-tone. Since it's tracker-action, you need to put a little elbow grease in your playing technique. All in all, it's a lovely instrument. Have any of you ever played one?   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: oldies and goodies--Part III From: RSiegel920@aol.com Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 20:09:29 EDT   In a message dated 5/3/99 5:40:18 PM Central Daylight Time, organdok@safari.net writes:   << I do believe most of the pieces on Lists I, II and III are transcriptions. >> In view of the age of the collections from which I believe Carlo was quoting , I would think this was "status quo" repertoire for the era when orchestras were few and far between and the G. A. Audsley- type of "concert organ" reigned supreme. FWIW R.J.Siegel  
(back) Subject: Re: oldies and goodies--Part III From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 17:24:28 -0700   AWWW! Transcriptions are FUN!   Bud (also by the sea) Organist/Choirmaster St. Matthew's-in-the-Mall   Dr. Darryl Miller wrote:   > Hello Carlo et al! > > I do believe most of the pieces on Lists I, II and III are transcriptions. > > Let's make a list of "real" organ music! Shall we? > > Yours, > > Darryl by the Sea > Fort Lauderdale, FL > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: more on consoles, etc. From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 17:38:29 -0700       Richard Pinel wrote:   > (snip) > > > > I think that you may be slightly mistaken (forgive me if I'm wrong!!). In my > experience it goes (from left to right!): > Swell, Pedal, Solo, Choir, Great. On this size instrument there would be 5 > groups of stops, which is obviously uneven. Therefore a group of couplers is > often found.   I may well be, but I think when the Harrison console arrived at Cincinnati, the jambs were arranged (left to right) Swell, Great, Positiv, Choir, Pedal. Wayne Fisher was LIVID, and they had to rebuild the jambs in situ ... as a result, the combination action was never totally reliable. If I AM wrong, I STILL think either that or Pedal - Positive - Great - Swell would be more logical. What strikes me as ILLOGICAL is having the Pedal (the lowest division) on the same jamb as the Swell (the highest division).   > The common English pitch layout is (from bottom to top): > 32' Flues, 16' Flues, 8' Flues, 4' Flues, (2' Flues), 32' Reeds, 16' Reeds, > 8' Reeds, (4' Reeds). > > I prefer this - but only because I'm used to it. On the 3 manual organ at my > church, the stops are (left to right): > Swell, Choir <= Manuals => Pedal Great. > On the 2 manual it is: > Swell with couplers underneath <= Manuals => Great with pedal underneath. > > Richard.   SOMEWHERE I must have played an organ (in my formative years?) where the pitches went from top to bottom, rather than bottom to top, because I still find it out of kilter when I sit down at a typical bomber cockpit with the 32's buried behind the key cheek.   Actually my FAVORITE console is Holtkamp's ... stop tongues with everything where you can see it and within easy reach. But that doesn't square esthetically with my penchant for romantic organs (grin). If an organ SOUNDS like a B-52, the console should LOOK like a B-52 (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: The organ: King of Instruments... From: "rollin smith" <rollinsmithv@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 20:45:01 -0400   I must tell you, this is the oldest organ joke in the world! It has been around since Everett Truette's "The Organ".   How silly - - - and pathetic . . .   Rollin Smith    
(back) Subject: Re: birthdays From: "rollin smith" <rollinsmithv@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 20:52:08 -0400   Carlo wrote, " just thought I'd remind you that today marks the birthdays of Virgil Fox and Marcel Dupré. May their music live forever."     As far as we know, fox composed no music. May Marcel Dupre's music live forever !   Rollin Smitrh    
(back) Subject: Re: more on consoles, etc. From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 18:18:39 -0700       >I may well be, but I think when the Harrison console arrived at Cincinnati, the >jambs were arranged (left to right) Swell, Great, Positiv, Choir, Pedal. Wayne >Fisher was LIVID, and they had to rebuild the jambs in situ ... as a result, the >combination action was never totally reliable. If I AM wrong, I STILL think >either that or Pedal - Positive - Great - Swell would be more logical. What >strikes me as ILLOGICAL is having the Pedal (the lowest division) on the same >jamb as the Swell (the highest division).     I suppose it's largely what one is used to. I grew up around Aeolian-Skinner organs which always had Pedal-Swell on the left and Great-Choir on the right. I came across a Skinner (EM rebuilt by Aeolian) last night that had Choir-Great on the right side. The Swell stops are in close to the keyboards and when I'm playing on the Swell they are close to me; same is true of the Great. Should we take a vote?   1. Pedal-Swell on the left; Great-Choir on the right 2. Swell-Great on the left; Choir-Pedal on the right 3. Stops ascending from the bottom, flues first, reeds on top 4. Stops descending from the top, flues first, reeds on the bottom   OR ....?   Jason   ----------------------------------------------------- Pray for peace, brotherly love and good will towards all!   JOHANNUS of Northern California http://www.johannus-norcal.com  
(back) Subject: Re: more on consoles, etc. From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 21:39:21 -0400 (EDT)   I vote for Pedal - Swell on the left, Choir - Great on the right; intermanual couplers above the Swell manual.   For larger organs: Pedal - Swell - Bombarde on the left, Choir/Solo - Positive - Great on the right; couplers above ....   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   If a dog will not come to you after he has looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience. --Woodrow Wilson    
(back) Subject: more on consoles, etc. From: "arpncorn" <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 20:58:23 CDT   On Mon, 03 May 1999 21:49:45 -0700, Bud Clark <budchris@earthlink.net> wrote:   > Here are some more thoughts:   > Stop arrangement:   <snippage>   > The Rieger in All Souls' Unitarian in Washington had the choruses > arranged horizontally to the left of each manual on slant-boards ... > strings, reeds, cornet, tremulant; flutes; principals ...   Greetings from California, Gang, where I've been doing some re-voicing of an instrument for Randy Terry's Church; Christ Episcopa Church in Los Altos, CA (near San Jose).   family it was: The configuration we used was:   White: Principals and Mixtures Blue: Flutes Yellow: Strings Green: Mutations Orange: Quintadena Red: Reeds Black: Couplers: Grey: Accessories   This allowed people to know what they were hunting for "periferally", in that if you hit blue buttons, one knew they were going to get flutes, and they were arranged in "families" of choruses according to what kind of stop character they were.   <more snippage>   > (all stops and pistons are square buttons with lighted nomenclature).   There are many styles of buttons available that would work these days.   > One thing that IS needed is a three-manual console that an > organist/choirmaster can see OVER.   Even though we used a normal "Nameboard" on this console, it was quite low-profile when it was done. If we were going to use a 3 manual design, we would have put the stop push-buttons on splayed panels on either side.   > Dimensions of keys:   builders still use that pattern, including Visser-Rowland (now Visser & Associates), as I recall. (Pieter would be prolly very glad to tell us if that's still so!)   > I rather like the various "silent" non-moving stop and combination > actions ... there's nothing more distracting during Mass than a big > "thunk" just before the organ plays.   han attraction technology, which makes the force of activation the strongest at the beginning of the movement of the knob or tab, rather than at the end of the stroke!   > The only problem with most of them is that either the tabs are too > small, or you can't see what's lit, depending on where the sun's > coming from.   Rather than being back-lit, we used buttons which had tiny LED's on the top edge of them, and there was never any question as to whether or not they were on; even if the Sun was shining directly on them!   This is a topic which fascinates me greatly, and I think there are many other solutions to "interfacing" with an organ rather than the "usual three" (drawknobs, tilt tabs or stopkeys).   Faithfully,   "Arp" in Silicon Valley      
(back) Subject: Console Layout / Design From: "Mr. Jan VanDerStad" <dcob@nac.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 22:41:21 -0400   Good evening pipechatters: I have been following this thread a bit reguarding console design. What I always enjoy to see is stop knobs or tablets laid out strictly by pitch. This may seem odd to some of you, but I know the console at church is done this way. For example, the Swell: 8' Gedeckt 8' Viola 8' Voix Celeste 8' Trumpette 8' Krumhorn 4' Gemshorn 4' Rohrflute 4' Clarion 2-2/3' Nazard 2' Flautino. Notice the fact that the reeds are not grouped by themselves as is so common. When playing for service- preludes especially, I like to start out with a couple of softer 8' stops and build by pitch. I'm not so sure I would like the idea of stop families grouped together, except maybe when you have to add all the principal stops at once for a hymn right after the introduction which you may play with softer stops. That way you could just plunk down all the principals at once without having to waste time looking for them, and this can be a problem especially on larger organs. So in some ways I guess it has to be a decision between the organbuilder and the organist as to how the stop tablets are arranged, and yes, I have been down that road. I remember one console where the couplers were also totally intertwined with the stops. After the great 8' stops, there would be the swell to great 8' coupler. Cant remember though where I saw that. I wonder what some of our fellow list-member organ builders have to say on this. Mr. Vanderstad Dutch Craft Organ Builders      
(back) Subject: Edward Elgar... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 23:20:36 EDT   hey gang,   who originally transcribed "Nimrod" from the "Enigma Variations" for the organ? I play Diane's transcription, but are there others? I'd like to know.   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Max Drischner... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 03 May 1999 23:25:37 EDT   hey all,   does anyone have the "choral preludes for the village organist" by Max Drischner? It was originally published by "Peters", but has vanished off the face of the earth.   Carlo   p.s. a big thank you to a fellow list member for sending me "A Gothic Cathedral" by Pratella/Weaver.     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: trompettes en chamade.... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 00:14:33 EDT   hey gang,   I'd like some info as to the origins of the horizontal trumpet. When did they first appear? As far as I know, they weren't around when Bach was alive. Did they first appear on european organs or here in North America?   Carlo   p.s. which organ in the world has the most sets of horizontals?     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Fw: trompettes en chamade.... From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 23:24:10 -0500   I don't know the origon of these, but Spain has tons of honking Diesel horns hanging from their instruments. Perhaps a marimba on the Great or Solo would be nice too. Macarena, anyone?-- I'll lead.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Carlo Pietroniro <concert_organist@hotmail.com> To: organchat@onelist.com <organchat@onelist.com>; pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Monday, May 03, 1999 11:14 PM Subject: trompettes en chamade....     >hey gang, > > I'd like some info as to the origins of the horizontal >trumpet. When did they first appear? As far as I know, they weren't around >when Bach was alive. Did they first appear on european organs or here in >North America? > >Carlo > >p.s. which organ in the world has the most sets of horizontals? > > >______________________________________________________ >Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: anyone out there??? From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 00:33:42 EDT   hey gang,   I feel that I'm the only one here tonight. Has everyone gone to bed early? Anyway, I heard (from a semi-reliable source) that the National Cathedral in Washington has a 64' pedal stop. Does anyone know if this is true? If it is true.....oh man!   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: organ dedication From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 1999 23:44:45 -0500   Dear Listers... Ya'll are invited to a dedication of a 2m 4r Wicks at the Moscow Christian Church in (where else) Moscow, Indiana. We are southeast of Indianapolis about 40 miles in the corn fields.   The instrument has been up and playing for several months now, and sounds wonderful in this acoustical +ACI- barn +ACI- of a church building. Ranks include flute, dulciana (celested), salicional, and diapason. No toy counter has been added as yet, but have been considering a Spanish Diesel Horn En Chamade, ala Salsa dip.   The dedication is Sunday, May 23, at 2pm. After the formalities, a musical program will be presented, then refreshments and +ACI-open console+ACI-.   Anyone on PipeChat visiting the central Indiana area is more than welcome to join us. Bring your muzik.   Contact me at address below to attend or to say hi.   Ciao.   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net Cuckoo clocks make great wedding gifts      
(back) Subject: Re: anyone out there??? From: KurtvonS@aol.com Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 00:45:02 EDT   The National Cathedral used to have a few notes of a half-length 64' reed, like BBBBB,AAAAA#,etc.. I understand that this ugly and virtually useless bark has been replaced with something electronic.  
(back) Subject: when is a pipe organ not a pipe organ From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 21:57:42 -0700   OK, here's one for you ... at that same seminar I keep talking about (I wish I could find the article ... Senior Moment/no filing system), one organ-builder said that a pipe organ with ANY digital augmentation (even 12 notes of a 32') was no pipe organ at all, and most of his peers seemed to agree with him.   My argument against such things is practical, rather than esthetic/theoretical ... NO digital component whatsoever that is now or will be on the face of this planet in the foreseeable future will last as long as a well-made, simple tracker pipe organ. There's no point in building an organ that will last for a couple of hundred years if the stop action (or the 32' stop) is gonna fail in 25 (or even 50) years.   What think you?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: when is a pipe organ not a pipe organ From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 00:12:08 -0500   I think (sorry Bud) [1] that the topic has been endlessly debated (and will continue to be), [2] that nobody is going to be convinced that their opinion isn't right, [3] that a person should be content with whatever instrument he/she has to work with and should learn to get the most variety of sounds out of it that contribute to the music, and [4] of course, pipes are the ideal towards which we should strive - after all, the electronic is doing its best to imitate the original. But many people, for a variety of budgetary and space limitations, are simply better served with electronic instruments. Besides, what better way to get a new organ every few years? As one becomes obsolete, it's time to "upgrade" the system!   The owners at "Piporg-l" ruled that the pipes vs electronic debate was no longer a viable topic for online discussion and banned it from their e-waves! I hope pipechat will do the same. It's pointless.   Sorry, Bud. I like your contributions, but I hope this one doesn't go anywhere.   Rod Murrow   Bud/burgie wrote:   > OK, here's one for you ... at that same seminar I keep talking about (I > wish I could find the article ... Senior Moment/no filing system), one > organ-builder said that a pipe organ with ANY digital augmentation (even > 12 notes of a 32') was no pipe organ at all, and most of his peers > seemed to agree with him. > > My argument against such things is practical, rather than > esthetic/theoretical ... NO digital component whatsoever that is now or > will be on the face of this planet in the foreseeable future will last > as long as a well-made, simple tracker pipe organ. There's no point in > building an organ that will last for a couple of hundred years if the > stop action (or the 32' stop) is gonna fail in 25 (or even 50) years. > > What think you? > > Cheers, > > Bud > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: just curious........... From: MWORGLBAU@aol.com Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 01:14:33 EDT   Dear Carlo,   "I'm a little curious as to how many of you are church organists, concert organists, choir directors or organ enthusiasts. Also, out of the organists, what type of instruments do you have in your home to practice on?"   Well, I'm a pipe organbuilder, which occupies a vast majority of my time. I'm also am organist, but do not have a church position, and really do not care to have one. I also do some flight instruction during the evenings and weekends.   Because I'm around pipe organs all of the time, I do not care to have an organ at home. I do have an old upright piano that was originally my mothers, and then became mine when I was taking keyboard as a child. If I ever get the urge to play one, I've got keys to a number of churches within 15 minutes of my home that I can use whenever I want.   Hope that this answers your question.     Michael R. Williamson Williamson-Warne & Associates Hollywood Ca.  
(back) Subject: Re: The organ: King of Instruments... From: WGWUTILS@webtv.net (Bill) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 01:23:53 -0400 (EDT)   No, you don't find Diaphones in an orchestra; however, Robert Hope-Jones did design and supply a variety of Diaphone to the U.S. Lighthouse Service for use as foghorns in the Great Lakes lighthouses. I can tell you from personal experience that they are a very unique and welcome sound when running the Michigan Straits in a small boat in very heavy fog with a very small and inaccurate magnetic compass. The Straits are VERY rocky and very unforgiving of mistakes - the diaphone made a life or death difference except that I don't know if they are even in use anymore now that GPS is so accurate plus so affordable and small in size.   Bill Winchester, no longer in Michigan:-)