PipeChat Digest #829 - Tuesday, May 4, 1999
 
Re: my point, for those who missed it (grin)
  by "Russell Greene" <russg@cyberspc.mb.ca>
Moller trackers
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net>
A really dumb organist
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net>
Re: my point, for those who missed it (grin)
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: A really dumb organist
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: my point, for those who missed it (grin)
  by "Russell Greene" <russg@cyberspc.mb.ca>
when a pipe organ component fails
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
EMCATOS Silent Movie Comedy Night
  by "Bob & Sally Evans" <orgnloft@MA.ultranet.com>
trompette en chamade...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: anyone out there???
  by "antoni scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: 32's
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: 32's (Moller Tackers)
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
Re: trompette en chamade...
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Re: when a pipe organ component fails
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: trompette en chamade...
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: just curious...........
  by <MWORGLBAU@aol.com>
Wicks trackers
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Moller Trackers
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: just curious...........
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: just curious...........
  by <Posthorn8@aol.com>
Re: Wicks trackers
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: my point, for those who missed it (grin) From: "Russell Greene" <russg@cyberspc.mb.ca> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 12:28:27 -0500     >>The BUILDERS, for the most part, are making >> the decisions about compass ... SHOULD >> they be?   Doesn't anyone find it irresponsible to build instruments mainly with other people's money, to be used by multiple organists in public places which cannot physically handle the full range of repertoire? 61-note manuals and 32-note pedalboards have been a long-term standard. Why would any builder arbitrarily reduce either compass, thereby making a part of the repertoire impossible?   People on this list constantly talk about the unimportance of cost in terms of specifying pipes over digital, tracker over EP, etc. but then are willing to compromise the usefulness of an instrument FOREVER by reducing the manual or pedal compass to save a tiny amount of money by eliminating a few of the smallest pipes in the instrument. Does this make sense?  
(back) Subject: Moller trackers From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 12:30:25 -0700   Yea, Bruce, I'm always lurking around. The little Moller tracker I play is extremely well built.... I believe this is their first prototype. It sat on the floor of the factory for a number of years. Love having plexiglass bungboards ... can show the kids how the action works.   Sand Lawn     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: A really dumb organist From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 12:39:19 -0700   As there are no enclosed divisions on the Moller tracker I play, where the expressions pedals would be is a footrest. Recently an organist who was trying out the organ, left me a note asking why I kept the expression pedal locked. He had pressed as hard as he could, but could not get it to move! Wish I had been there to have actually heard him play.   Sand ..   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: my point, for those who missed it (grin) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 15:07:28 -0400 (EDT)     >Doesn't anyone find it irresponsible to build > instruments mainly with other people's > money, to be used by multiple organists in > public places which cannot physically handle > the full range of repertoire? NO well designed instrument can handle the 'full range of repertoir'. If an instrument is compromised to the point that everything sounds the same or very similar, then it is NOT handling the repertoire. Shortening the compass of a keyboard not only saves money but space as well; the length of the pipe is not the only consideration. There is also the consideration of the size of the windchest, the mechanism connecting to the key and the keys themselves. By doing this a small organ might gain an extra stop, which IMHO would be worth sacrificing a few notes that probably would never be used anyway. It would be good if a builder could share what the actual cost saving and trade-off might be. Another point, with regard to the historical aspect, is that any musician of reasonable ability would be able to work around this minor deficiency. In the long term scheme of things, 61 note manuals and 32 note pedals are relatively new "standards" and the repertory effected is hardly significant.   >...compromise the usefulness of an instrument > FOREVER by reducing the manual or pedal > compass to save a tiny amount of money by > eliminating a few of the smallest pipes in the > instrument. Does this make sense? If everything in art made sense, art would be terribly dull.   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton    
(back) Subject: Re: A really dumb organist From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 15:15:51 -0400 (EDT)     >As there are no enclosed divisions on the > Moller tracker I play, where the expressions > pedals would be is a footrest. Recently an > organist who was trying out the organ, left me > a note asking why I kept the expression pedal > locked. Gee... too bad you don't have several prepared stops to drive him nutz. Maybe you could get some stick-on toy levers like the "Death Ray" we have a Holy Trinity - Gainesville. Believe it or not, it is a constant source of questions from visitors.     bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton    
(back) Subject: Re: my point, for those who missed it (grin) From: "Russell Greene" <russg@cyberspc.mb.ca> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 14:34:03 -0500   Bruce Cornely wrote: > NO well designed instrument can handle the 'full range of repertoir'.   I said "physically" and meant just that. If the compass is shortened, you may run out of keys and therefore not be able to practice the full range of repertoire on the instrument. I was not commenting on whether the instrument would be capable of appropriate sonic presentation of the full range of repertoire.   Your argument for shortening the compass are akin to saying "If I make this piano with only 68 keys, it will fit in the alcove by the fireplace".   If we are talking about a private instrument built for an individual, go wild, do what you like, make the instrument as specialized and limited as your little heart desires. If we are talking about a public instrument, meant for more than your personal pleasure, built with someone else's money who is assuming versatility in use (certainly the case in a typical church organ), then this type of building is irresponsible and ultimately hurts the entire pipe organ industry.    
(back) Subject: when a pipe organ component fails From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 13:12:25 -0700   Yes, pipe organ components DO fail because of age (more often neglect), but there's all the difference in the world between that and the failure of electronic components.   I hesitate to name a builder because one shouldn't speak ill of the recently-departed, but he designed his own electronics, using things that have gone out of date and out of manufacture in the fast-moving electronic world. What that translates into is REPLACING the ENTIRE stop and combination action and (in the case of electric-action instruments) the ENTIRE key action, rather than simply mending it. This I know for a FACT because a friend of mine is currently rebuilding one of his instruments; the organ is less than thirty years old.   When components in a tracker-action pipe organ fail, as long as there are organ-builders and organ technicians, they can be repaired easily. I call attention to my earlier post about the role of 19th century blacksmiths in setting up and maintaining organs in remote areas.   If a tracker breaks, there should be a supply of trackers on hand. Anyone with a little woodworking savvy and mechanical knowledge can replace a tracker if they have to. Ditto leather nuts, etc. Mending the feeders and the reservoir and anything else that takes sciving and hot glue should probably be left to the organ tech, but again, the materials are readily available. Well, sorta ... the quality of modern leather is becoming a bigger and bigger problem, and so far the experiments with space-age materials have mostly ended in failure. But doesn't that support my point (grin)?   Yes, pipes with high lead content do collapse on their toes in a hundred years or so if they're not properly supported and racked. That IS more serious. But a 20th century replacement pipe is not different IN ITS ESSENTIALS from a 19th century one, or earlier. True, it may be hard to match the tin content and the voicing EXACTLY, but it CAN be done.   I have only encountered sagging languids once, and that was in the facade pipes of a turn-of-the-century Hook and Hastings, probably due to folks poking at them as much as anything (they were within reach).   A well-constructed slider windchest will play just about forever, if it's protected from moisture and supplied with clean air. I have opened countless pallet boxes where the pallet leather was as soft and pliable as the day the organ was built. Usually those organs were in rural areas with a minimum of air pollution. And the slider chests on old organs are LESS likely to fail from the wood warping because of the quality of wood that was available to them.   IF someday digital organs are hand-made with the same care, attention to detail, and absolutely first-class materials as hand-crafted pipe organs, AND with the same simplicity of design and repair, then there might be more of a basis for discussion.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: EMCATOS Silent Movie Comedy Night From: orgnloft@MA.ultranet.com (Bob & Sally Evans) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 17:50:23 -0500       The Eastern Massachusetts Chapter of the American Theatre Organ Society presents five short silent films accompanied by Chad Weirick at the EMCATOS 4/18 Wurlitzer Theatre Pipe Organ.The films star Gloria Swanson, Laurel and Hardy, aand Charlie Chaplin, among others. The films will be introduced by Scott and Jan MacGillivray, experts in silent movie history.   SILENT MOVIE COMEDY NIGHT RICHARD KNIGHT AUDITORIUM BABSON COLLEGE, WELLESLEY, MA. SATURDAY, MAY 8, 1999 7:30 P.M. Tickets: (617) 244-9447     DON'T MISS THIS FUN-FILLED EVENING!   Bob's Wurlitzer Loft, Swansea, MA Home of "Rochelle" the Wurlitzer RJ-12 Pipe Organ      
(back) Subject: trompette en chamade... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 18:04:34 EDT   hey all,   a fellow list member asked me about the number of horizontals at Coral Ridge. There are 4.   Double Trompette 16' Trompeta Real 8' Clarion 4' Trompette de Fete 8' (antiphonal)   I think there are 4 or 5 sets on the V/204-Moller at the Calvary Church in Charlotte, North Carolina. Can someone please correct me if I'm wrong. I want to be sure. As for the V/293-Ruffatti at the Crystal Cathedral, there are 4, and they're split between the 3 balconies. There's a 4-manual console in the rear balcony that operates the organ as well, but it's not built by Ruffatti, I'm 99% sure it's a Moller console.   Carlo.   p.s. If there's anyone who'd like a stop-list of the V/117-Ruffatti at Coral Ridge, let me know.     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: anyone out there??? From: antoni scott <ascott@epix.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 18:11:07 -0400   To the List:   If it has a 64' it is probably a 32' stop using the c and g together. A more expensive way is to use a sepaarate 32' and a 22-2/3 rank played together to give the "derived" 64. The best way ( done only twice ) is to build a 64 resonator. Problems with 64' reeds are the slow start-up of the speech because of the long reed tongue.     Antoni Scott   Carlo Pietroniro wrote: > > hey gang, > > I feel that I'm the only one here tonight. Has everyone > gone to bed early? Anyway, I heard (from a semi-reliable source) that the > National Cathedral in Washington has a 64' pedal stop. Does anyone know if > this is true? If it is true.....oh man! > > Carlo > > ______________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: 32's From: Brent Johnson <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 17:30:34 -0500   I checked around a little, and while many people are in agreement that Wicks built a few tracker organs. However, nobody is in agreement as to exactly how many. Nobody can vouch for any more than 2. The one in the studio, and Opus 1. This may require actual research. Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://235.209.102.9/~org20050 organwebring@hotmail.com   bruce cornely wrote:   > >Actually, of the major builders, I think > > EVERYBODY has at least experimented with > > them. There's even a Moller/Flentrop out > > there somewhere. > I believe Moller actually built five mechanical action organs on their > own, one even played by a listmember (Sand, are you there?) > > >...and I imagine the surviving old factory > > builders (Schantz, Wicks, Austin) aren't too > > interested in THAT. > I played a mechanical action organ at the Wicks factory several years > ago, and it was quite nice. I'm not sure how many mechanical action > organs Wicks has built, but I believe it exceeds ten. There are several > Wicks guys on the list who could probably be more specific for us. > > bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net > > If a dog will not come to you after he has looked you in the face, you > should go home and examine your conscience. --Woodrow Wilson > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: 32's (Moller Tackers) From: Prestant16@aol.com Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 18:53:09 EDT   I've played an early Moller tracker, I believe it was built in 1905. I was very impressed with the action and the case was of cherry with just plain zinc pipes, simple and elegant. It was small. about 12-15 ranks. REAL hard to service. To tune the swell, you had to turn off the wind, crawl over the reservoir, and climb up to the swell. Then the keyholder turned the wind on.   MY VIEW ON 32' stops:   16' Open woods are great for 32' Bourdon, especially Estey Open Woods. Although they may not be able to go down to low CCCC, it will usually go down to low DDDD. In once case, at Fairhaven Unitarian, MA, a Hutchings organ was replaced by a Roche organ (The firms largest, about 65 stops). The old Open Wood was used as the 32' Bourdon, and the lowest 3 notes, C, C# and D were all the same pipes, I couldn't tell the difference. On another organ by the same firm, at Church of the Pilgrimage in Plymouth, MA (Roche's second largest) The 32' Bourdon are stopped Open Woods. The Bourdon could only go down to low EEEE, so C, C#, D, & D# were the Pedal 16' Bourdon and an independent 10 2/3' Quint. Although not as successful as the Faihaven organ, nobody really notices. On the Church of the Pilgrimage organ there is also a 32' resultant Bombarde. It Has about 6 stops borrowed at really odd pitches but it works. In my opinion the best way to get a good reed resultant is by using the following combo:   16' Reed 10 2/3' Open wood (or Principal, plays G) 8' Flute 6 2/5' Stopped Flute (plays E) 4 4/7' Stopped Flute (plays A#)   That combination really works good for a 32' reed resultant.     -William C.  
(back) Subject: Re: trompette en chamade... From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 19:08:02 -0400   At 06:04 PM 5/4/99 EDT, Carlo wrote:   >If there's anyone who'd like a stop-list of the V/117-Ruffatti at Coral >Ridge, let me know.   Well . . . if anyone wants the stop list and some nifty pictures, etc., you can access our Coral Ridge Church website at www.cr-online.com.   Questions? Just ask.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea Fort Lauderdale, FL    
(back) Subject: Re: when a pipe organ component fails From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 16:17:54 -0700   >IF someday digital organs are hand-made with the same care, attention to >detail, and absolutely first-class materials as hand-crafted pipe >organs, AND with the same simplicity of design and repair, then there >might be more of a basis for discussion. >   Most digital organs are more or less "standard" configurations, produced in quantity to achieve lower costs and therefore lower selling prices. Custom built instruments, which are available from many electronic builders, cost more. Even so, a 60 stop digital organ costs a tiny fraction of what a 60 stop pipe organ costs. Is it fair to expect it to last as long as its pipe counterpart when it costs 1/20th to 1/10th as much as the real thing and requires very little or no maintenance for many years? The whole digital organ can be replaced in 20 or 30 years (if one wanted to, though it may still be playing fine) with just the funds one would have expended maintaining and tuning the pipe organ. To expect a $70,000 investment to match a $1,000,000 investment in terms of longevity seems to be a bit unfair. Their are tradeoffs on both sides: pipes require a much larger initial investment, more space, plus maintenance and tuning; digital organs require a much smaller initial investment, less space, little or no maintenance (at least for a good number of years) and no tuning.   I am very much pro-pipe organ, I love them and think there's nothing more wonderful. If everyone could afford pipes we would not be discussing electronics at all, they would probably not exist, at least as know them. Even the very best digital organ, which can come extremely close in sound, would never stop the construction of fine pipe organs for those individuals and institutions that can afford them, nor should it. If I have my choice between 6 ranks of pipes and a 60 stop quality digital instrument I'll choose the digital because I want the flexibility to perform all the organ literature. Some may disagree, and that's fine. It would be a dull world indeed if everyone agreed on everything and all things were the same, wouldn't it?   Cheers,   Jason   ----------------------------------------------------- Pray for peace, brotherly love and good will towards all!   JOHANNUS of Northern California http://www.johannus-norcal.com      
(back) Subject: Re: trompette en chamade... From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 16:22:46 -0700   > <snip> As for the V/293-Ruffatti at the Crystal >Cathedral, there are 4, and they're split between the 3 balconies. There's a >4-manual console in the rear balcony that operates the organ as well, but >it's not built by Ruffatti, I'm 99% sure it's a Moller console. > Yes, the rear console was built by Moeller but I believe it is a 5-manual. I would have to look up the photo, but I'm 98% sure of that. The organ is really only part Ruffatti (about 117 ranks from the original organ, which I played many years ago) and the balance comes from an Aeolian-Skinner they purchased from Lincoln Center in NY plus what other ranks have been added, built by whom I'm not sure.   Jason ----------------------------------------------------- Pray for peace, brotherly love and good will towards all!   JOHANNUS of Northern California http://www.johannus-norcal.com    
(back) Subject: Re: just curious........... From: MWORGLBAU@aol.com Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 19:37:03 EDT   Dear Bruce,   "But Michael, you have to get dressed!!! ;-)"   I had an appliance to practice on when I was in Middle School/High School (now gone). I tried practicing once in the buff (when no one was home). Only problem was that my rear and the back of my legs kept sticking to the bench, and I could not slide around at all. First and only time I tried it. So Bruce, for me, clothes are not a problem :-).     Michael R. Williamson Williamson-Warne & Associates Hollywood Ca.  
(back) Subject: Wicks trackers From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 20:12:59 -0400 (EDT)       >I checked around a little, and while many > people are in agreement that Wicks built a > few tracker organs. However, nobody is in > agreement as to exactly how many. Nobody > can vouch for any more than 2. The one in > the studio, and Opus 1. I have brochures for: St. James Lutheran -- Victor Iowa Great compass 56/32 Holzgedeckt 8 Octave 4 Koppelflote 4 Flachflote 2 Mixture II ~~~ Swell Rohrflote 8 Erzahler 8 tc Gemshorn 4 Nasat 2-2/3 Principal 2 Trompette 8 ~~~ Pedal Subbass 16 Principal 8 Choralbass 4 :::::::::::::::::::::: Alexander City Jr College, Alabama Manual I compass 61/32 Principal 8 Quintade 8 Oktave 4 Spitzflote 4 Blockflote 2 Mixtur III ~~~ Manual II Gemshorn 8 Gedeckt 8 Rohrflote 4 Nazard 2-2/3 Schweitzerpfeife 2 Terz 1-3/5 Krummhorn 8 ~~~ Pedal Subbass 16 Principal 8 Pommer 8 Choralbass 4 Rauschpfeife II Posaune 16 ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Bethlehem Lutheran Church - Slater Iowa Great compass 56/32 Principal 8 Rohrflote 8 Prestant 4 Koppelflote 4 Fifteenth 2 Mixture III ~~~ Swell Holzgedeckt 8 Viola 8 tc Vox Celeste 8 tc Gemshorn 4 Nazard 2-2/3 Principal 2 Trompette 8 Tremolo ~~~ Pedal Subbass 16 Principal 8 Pommer 8 Choralbass 4 Dulzian 16 :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: a one manual organ -- location unknown to me Manual compass 56/30 Gedeckt 8 Prestant 4 Flute 4 Octave 2 Mixture III ~~~ Pedal Subbass 16   Suspended mechanical action Mechanical stop action with drawknobs Foot operated hitch-down coupler   (not to mention a lovely case with tuning scrolls on the back of the facade pipes!!! However, the pedal board is AGO - sigh!)   I'll try to remember to check the Wicks site tomorrow.   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton    
(back) Subject: Moller Trackers From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 20:29:39 -0400 (EDT)   >I've played an early Moller tracker, I believe it > was built in 1905. I was very impressed with > the action and the case was of cherry with > just plain zinc pipes, simple and elegant. It > was small. about 12-15 ranks. REAL hard to > service. To tune the swell, you had to turn off > the wind, crawl over the reservoir, and climb > up to the swell. Then the keyholder turned the > wind on. I did partial restoration on a 1908 Moller tracker (opus 914). It is a beautiful instrument with a very comfortable action (without restoration). To tune the Swell several shades had to be removed, but access was easy from the walk board behind the Great. The facade pipes were zinc, with decorative stencilling which was discovered beneath three coats of gold and one coat of green (you know the color) paint. The pipes were stripped and the stencilling restored. The stoplist: Great compass 61/30 Open Diapason 8 (17 in facade) Doppel Flute 8 (wood) Violina 8 Dulciana 8 (12 in facade) Principal 4 Flute d'Amour 4 (wood w/bored stoppers) ~~~ Swell Lieblich Gedackt 16 tc (wood) Open Diapason 8 (full length throughout) Stopped Diapason 8 (wood) Salicional 8 Voix celestes 8 tc AEoline 8 (1-12 capped) Flute harmonic 4 Flautina 2 Oboe-Bassoon Tremolo ~~~ Pedal (tubular pneumatic action) Bourdon 16 Lieblich Gedacht 16   The double rise reservoir is still in place, as is the pumping mechanism; however, the water motor is gone. This organ (to my knowledge) is still in place at Mt. Zion AME Church - Jacksonville FL, although the church has purchased a digital for general use. The organ previously at Mt. Zion, was a 2/21 Hook & Hastings (op 1856), and was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1901.   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton    
(back) Subject: Re: just curious........... From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 20:47:56 -0400 (EDT)   =A0>I had an appliance to practice on when I was >in Middle School/High School (now gone). I > tried practicing once in the buff (when no one > was home). Only problem was that my rear > and the back of my legs kept sticking to the > bench, and I could not slide around at all. > First and only time I tried it. So Bruce, for me, > clothes are not a problem :-). Oh dearie me! I should've made myself clear... teeheehee. I was assuming you would be wearing pyjamas.   bruce (blushing and running for my salts)   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton    
(back) Subject: Re: just curious........... From: Posthorn8@aol.com Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 21:57:19 EDT   In a message dated 5/4/99 7:49:28 PM EST, cremona84000@webtv.net writes:   << I had an appliance to practice on when I was >in Middle School/High School (now gone). I > tried practicing once in the buff (when no one > was home). Only problem was that my rear > and the back of my legs kept sticking to the > bench, and I could not slide around at all. > First and only time I tried it. So Bruce, for me, > clothes are not a problem :-). >>   Can I get a picture of that?   Tim  
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks trackers From: Brent Johnson <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Tue, 04 May 1999 21:13:35 -0500     That makes three extras. From the spec, I think I know the one manual you list, but who knows, maybe there are two. That would make a total of 5. I'm quite positive you won't find anything on the Wicks web site regarding Wicks trackers, but you will find a nice picture of the studio tracker as situated in the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis (temporarily). Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://209.235.102.9/~org20050 (This address is different every time I post it.) organwebring@hotmail.com   bruce cornely wrote:   > > Suspended mechanical action > Mechanical stop action with drawknobs > Foot operated hitch-down coupler > > (not to mention a lovely case with tuning scrolls on the back of the > facade pipes!!! However, the pedal board is AGO - sigh!) > > I'll try to remember to check the Wicks site tomorrow. > > bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net > > The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll > settle for the puppy every time. --Winston Pendelton > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org