PipeChat Digest #842 - Sunday, May 9, 1999
 
Liberty Bell March
  by "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
notice
  by "OJ" <owenj@dynamite.com.au>
Darwin, Australia (X posted)
  by "Ruth-Chris" <theraven@sympatico.ca>
Re: my choir and the death of Louis Vierne...
  by "William Morton" <wjm@pacbell.net>
Re: Wedding reguest... NOT
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Darwin, Australia (X posted)
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: afflictions
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: used organs
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Suitable Beginner's Organ Music
  by "Carl & Grace Snip" <cgscissors@followme.com>
Re: Wedding reguest... NOT
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Louis Vierne's Death:  The Final Word
  by <Lewwill@aol.com>
Re: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music
  by "Rod Murrow" <murrows@pldi.net>
Re: used organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Pilgrimage Organs
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: St. Jacobi Kirche
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: used organs
  by "jon" <jonberts@swbell.net>
Re: used organs
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: used organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: used organs
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
variable-resistive key-contact
  by "Robert Carver" <RCARVER@SkyBest.Com>
Fw: St. Jacobi Kirche
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Liberty Bell March From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Sun, 9 May 99 06:12:12 -0500   I believe I heard a performance of "The Liberty Bell March" played by two of the fine organists at the MTAB.   Once it got rolling, it was a fantastic performance!   Tom Gregory   p.s.   It is 6:00 A.M. in Wisconsin and I have just finished watching and recording the broadcast from Salt Lake City. It always amazes me how this large group can maintain such fine quality week after week.  
(back) Subject: notice From: OJ <owenj@dynamite.com.au> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 21:49:10 +1000   I received a real virus today, luckily Norton's captured it, however, since we are not allowed to let anyone know, good luck!    
(back) Subject: Darwin, Australia (X posted) From: Ruth-Chris <theraven@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 07:55:33 -0400   Good Morning,   Does anyone know of any interesting music places to check out in = Darwin/Australia. A friend of mine is going for 10 months and she would = like to check out the organs, also to take organ lesson, and find a = place to practice.   Ruth    
(back) Subject: Re: my choir and the death of Louis Vierne... From: William Morton <wjm@pacbell.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 09:09:09 -0700   At 10:19 PM 5/8/99 -0400, you wrote:   > >".......=C0 l'occasion de son 1750e concert, Vierne, apr=E8s avoir jou=E9= son =20 >"Triptyque", meurt =E0 son orgue de Notre-Dame d'une embolie cardiaque (on= le=20 >transportera vainement =E0 l"H=F4tel-Dieu voisin), alors qu'il commen=E7ait= =E0=20 >improviser sur l'Alma Redemptoris Mater."   This translates by one of the computer-based translation systems (Yahoo) into the following somewhat contorted babble:   =C0 the occasion of sound 1750e concert, Vierne, after having played its " Triptych ", dies in its organ of Our-Lady of a cardiac embolism (one will vainly transport it to close l"H=F4tel-God), whereas it started to improvise on Alma Redemptoris MATER. "=20   < W J Morton wjm@pacbell.net > =20 No trees were harmed by the production of this message; however, a rather large number of electrons were somewhat inconvenienced.  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding reguest... NOT From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 12:43:44 EDT   In a message dated 5/8/99 12:52:04 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << What about the bridal procession doing silly walks down the aisle? What about arranging for a two-ton weight to drop down from the nave roof onto the bride's mother? This wedding could really be something completely different <g> >>   Better yet, how about John Cleese giving away the bride in a very TACKY manner?   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Darwin, Australia (X posted) From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 13:11:03 EDT   Dear Ruth and Fellow List Members,   Your friend may wish to contact Ms. Leonie Hempton, who is the Director of Music, at St. Peter's Anglican Cathedral in Adelaide, Australia, she may have contacts in Darwin. The website for this cathedral is amazing (with TONS of audio recordings, both organ and choral, which you can listen to online): http://www.adelaide.net.au/~lipman/contents.htm Everyone should check this great site out!   John  
(back) Subject: Re: afflictions From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 13:57:36 EDT   In a message dated 99-05-07 01:39:28 EDT, you write:   << I had a violinist- friend ask me if organists or pianists ever suffered from the Carpel- Tunnel Syndrome. I told him I've not heard of anyone that did. Suffer from arthritus, yes, but not from the +ACI-computer affliction+ACI-. >> Carpal Tunnel has afflicted two organist friends of mine. One lady had to wear wrist braces for quite a while (a non-surgical remedy) and the other used physocal therapy and also becaom our local advocate for the Alexander Technique. (This is, simply put, using the physocal functions of the hands in ways that they want to 'naturally' work, minimizing the strsses that can cause damage to the nerve sheath in the wrist)   Rick Maryman Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: used organs From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 13:57:25 EDT   Rod -   There was a time that Baldwin used a variable-resistive key-contact system. When those keypads wore out, the organ (the playing thereof) became very problematic, as the notes would either burp abruptly into playing or not play at all. If the new Baldwin you're looking at uses this type of keying, I'd say steer clear. IMHO You'd be better off with Brand "R" or brand "A" (in that order), if you can find one that suits.   Rick Maryman Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music From: "Carl & Grace Snip" <cgscissors@followme.com> Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 14:14:57 -0400   Dear Listers:   My sister asked if any of you could suggest some appropriate music (either pieces or entire books) that would be appropriate for 7-8 year old beginning organ students. Stuff currently in print/ purchasable would be preferable, but if there's some older material that stands head and shoulders above any contemporary material, I'll try to find her copies or arrange to make legitimate copies from whatever source I can find.   I don't know if it matters, but the students are starting straight in on the organ without any preliminary piano lessons.   Hope to hear something noteworthy! <g>   Carl Snip        
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding reguest... NOT From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 11:46:36 -0700   At 12:43 PM 5/9/1999 EDT, DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: >In a message dated 5/8/99 12:52:04 PM Central Daylight Time, >jlspeller@stlnet.com writes: > ><< What about the bridal > procession doing silly walks down the aisle? What about arranging for a > two-ton weight to drop down from the nave roof onto the bride's mother? > This wedding could really be something completely different <g> >> > >Better yet, how about John Cleese giving away the bride in a very TACKY >manner?   Yes! YES! I LURRRRRRVE it!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Louis Vierne's Death: The Final Word From: Lewwill@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 14:58:59 EDT   Dear Listers   I quote here from Bernard Gavoty's biography of Louis Vierne, translating:   "Wednesday, June 2nd, he followed his usual routine, giving a lesson and dining lightly before his concert. Around 8 p.m., his friends, Dr. & Mme Mallet, picked him up from his home on rue Saint-Ferdinand. Fifteen minutes later they were at Notre Dame. Vierne wished to arrive early because it took a while to climb to the tribune and he wanted to rest before playing.   He would open the recital with the first performance of his Triptyque, three short, slow pieces which troubled him, in spite of their facility. Having practiced the work only once, he feared having a memory lapse. Maurice Durufle soon joined him. Together they talked quietly at the balcony railing, while below them the nave rapidly filled with listeners. Vierne became anxious as the hour approached. His heart, always agitated at such times, beat rapidly. He took a tranquilizer and sat at the console. The sign was given for him to begin.   He played without pause the three pieces of his Triptyque: Matines, Communion and Stele pour un enfant defunt, composed in memory of the young Jean de Brancion, the son of a friend. At the conclusion of this work he took a few moments to relax before his improvisation. As always, he was now relaxed, having only to abandon himself to his imagination. The very stones of Notre Dame seemed perfumed with the magical dreams which he had provided for some thirty-seven years. One more was about to begin.   He was given the piece of paper with the theme for the improvisation inscribed in Braille; it was the Alma Redemptoris Mater. He reflected for a moment, set his registrations and calmly began to improvise. Suddenly he began to gasp. A pedal note sounded ominously. He put his hand to his heart and murmured a few words......and then nothing.   Dr. Mallet rushed to the tribune and tried to practice artificial respiration, while others rushed to find a priest who might give the last rites. All efforts to revive Vierne were in vain. He was taken to the nearby hospital where it was hoped that an injection to the heart would revive him. He was pronounced dead of a cardiac embolism."   Bernard Gavoty was a pupil of Vierne and an eminent musical historian . He also wrote an excellent biography of Jehan Alain, sadly long out of print, as is the Vierne book.   List members should be aware that Rollin Smith has a new book, Vierne & the Organ, due to be published shortly. Like Mr. Smith's previous books on Franck and Saint-Saens, this promises to be a splendid contribution to the interested reader.   Lew Williams  
(back) Subject: Re: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music From: Rod Murrow <murrows@pldi.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 15:23:27 -0500   The new series of instructions books by Wayne Leupold look very intriguing; I'm going to try them with a couple of elementary kids this summer. The series is called "Discover the Organ" and is published by Leupold Editions - Level 1 books are out; Level 2 should be soon.   Rod Murrow   Carl & Grace Snip wrote:   > Dear Listers: > > My sister asked if any of you could suggest some appropriate music (either > pieces or entire books) that would be appropriate for 7-8 year old beginning > organ students. Stuff currently in print/ purchasable would be preferable, > but if there's some older material that stands head and shoulders above any > contemporary material, I'll try to find her copies or arrange to make > legitimate copies from whatever source I can find. > > I don't know if it matters, but the students are starting straight in on the > organ without any preliminary piano lessons. > > Hope to hear something noteworthy! <g> > > Carl Snip > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: used organs From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 14:16:21 -0700   At 01:57 PM 5/9/1999 EDT, RMaryman@aol.com wrote: >Rod - > >There was a time that Baldwin used a variable-resistive key-contact system.<snip>   Yeah, a LONG LONG time ago. The new "Baldwin" (ex-Wurlitzers) are digitals, not analog. I'd like to hear what one sounds like, personally. I'd ALSO like to hear the new Hammond digital CS-series organs. Impressive specifications for a 2m, combo action, full AGO, and a 32' Violone! (These are called the "Concert Series", the heir apparent to the old E and RT of tonewheel days.) It would be nice if "R" and "A" had some competition for the home practice/smaller church market! Unfortunately, no Hammond dealers seem to stock one!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Pilgrimage Organs From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 17:07:54 EDT   In my own humble and unbiased opinion, well, alright- perhaps just a WEE BIT biased- the Grande Kilgen at the National Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, MI is certainly worthy of being a pilgrimage instrument.   Those who have seen it and played it recently, in the midst of ongoing restoration, have been impressed, pleased and pleasantly surprised. Recent visitors include improvisateur Paul Fejko, concert and recording organist (and my good friend) Tom Hazleton, recording producer and engineer Dick Clay and the list's own Fr. Thomas Buffer.   Fr. Buffer, who was for years a regular cintributor to pipeorg-L, was inducted into the Equestrian Order of the Knights and Ladies of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem this afternoon at the Shrine and we talked afterwards. He said that "it didn't have that usual Kilgen'underwater" sound. instead it just sort of....." and made a huge gesture with his hands implying that the sound really roars out of the galleries. What a pleasure to finally meet him and hear of his work and studies in Rome.   Paul Fejko was here week before last and played a 20 minute improvisation that literally knocked my socks off (and those of everyone else within earshot). He has recently released five CDs of his playing which are quite exciting and new as far as standard organ cds go. When asked if he thought it was an instrument worthy of being recorded he said "SURE! When do do we start?"   Tom Hazleton has been there twice to see and play the organ. The first time he sat in the church until 2 am playing the Kilgen and the second time attended a mass to hear it with a full congregation. Both times he said that it was one hot organ, to quote exactly: "one of the best." He especially likes the "moonbeam" stops of the organ, the Swell Flute Celeste and Dulciana/Unda Maris.   Dick Clay listened as he walked around with a big smile on his face. I think he was truly surprised that it had the power and clarity it does. he made several digital microphone tests. I can't wait to hear what it will sound like when digitally recorded in the upcomoing months and years.   Yes I am very proud of our instrument. It is truly one of a kind, without a doubt, and it has "that sound." That powerful, grand, broad roar that many of these old instruments have. And the tonal finishing of Henry Vincent Willis IV is indeed very obvious when hearing the instrument. That plus the fact that it is still totally original make it one very special organ worth seeing and playing to any visitors who will be coming this way. In fact- it was the second largest Kilgen ever built and is THE largest totally original and intact Kilgen left anywhere today.   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: Re: St. Jacobi Kirche From: "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com> Date: Thu, 6 May 1999 09:18:45 -0400     >> Another thing, are the faces on the >> stops anyone important, like composers or are they just random >faces? >> >> >Barnes has a picture of that console in his book, and says "I don't >konw who >Arp's friends were that are so beautifully depicted on the carved >draw-knobs."     I heard that they were the faces of the pastors of the church, the organist, and benefactors who gave money for the organ at the time the organ was built. Plus, it had the devils head on the Tremolo knob.     Jason Comet Junior in High School bombarde8@juno.com Begining Driver - Get off the streets! |\ Organist/Choir Director | | 2/13 C. E. Morey/Knapton/Raville organ O 7 member choir   (I have to redo this address. The organ and choir arn't the same anymore. Plus I'm not a beginning driver anymore!)   ___________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 19:02:33 -0400 (EDT)   Carl, It would probably work just as well to use a piano method with which the student would be happy, after all... notes are notes, and the kids probably won't be able to reach the pedals any way. I would assume that you have found (or are) an organist teaching these wee ones to play. In this case, the teacher will be able to teach the students about the organ and its stops without the use of a specific method book. The main training should be directed to learning to play notes musically and to listen to the stops with regard to blend and appropriateness to the pieces being played. Many pieces can be played on two as well as one manual. Having been one of those who started on the organ, I have no problem with it. Playing the piano has been invaluable to my organ technique, but I only started playing the piano as a pianist (rather than as an accompanist) when I became interested in it. I believe that a child should be taught to play the instrument which has caught their fancy, rather than the correct one which "should" precede it! I will be most happy to help in any way that I can. I wish you and the youngsters well!   bruce   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net The best way to get a puppy is to beg for a baby brother -- and they'll settle for the puppy every time. -- Winston Pendelton      
(back) Subject: Re: used organs From: jon <jonberts@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 18:44:26 -0500   Rick: you ought to check out our Classic series......we build using equipment from Artisian Classic Organ Works, Markham, Ont. Canada.....They have blown the competition away every time.   Jon Bertschinger Voicer/Technician Temple Organs Pipe and Digital Sampling Organs RMaryman@aol.com wrote:   > Rod - > > There was a time that Baldwin used a variable-resistive key-contact system. > When those keypads wore out, the organ (the playing thereof) became very > problematic, as the notes would either burp abruptly into playing or not play > at all. If the new Baldwin you're looking at uses this type of keying, I'd > say steer clear. IMHO You'd be better off with Brand "R" or brand "A" (in > that order), if you can find one that suits. > > Rick Maryman > Staunton VA > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: used organs From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 17:26:50 -0700       Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 01:57 PM 5/9/1999 EDT, RMaryman@aol.com wrote: > >Rod - > > > >There was a time that Baldwin used a variable-resistive key-contact > system.<snip>   Was THAT what made the old Baldwin Model 5s sound like a wheezy reed organ??!!   > Yeah, a LONG LONG time ago. The new "Baldwin" (ex-Wurlitzers) are digitals, > not analog. I'd like to hear what one sounds like, personally.   > I'd ALSO like to hear the new Hammond digital CS-series organs. Impressive > specifications for a 2m, combo action, full AGO, and a 32' Violone!   Harumph! Hope they sound better than a Hammond 825. If I didn't have two Leslie butter churns set permanently on "celeste", I'd go MAD (grin)! An 825 is fine up to about a mezzo-forte, and the Trumpet and the Oboe are actually quite decent, but the strings overpower the principals, and the only decent full sound is on the SWELL with the 2' Principal and the Swell to Swell 4' drawn ... there's a Great to Pedal, but no Swell to Great.   > (These > are called the "Concert Series", the heir apparent to the old E and RT of > tonewheel days.) It would be nice if "R" and "A" had some competition for > the home practice/smaller church market! Unfortunately, no Hammond dealers > seem to stock one!   My music dealer friend tells me that was exactly the reason for the 800 series (I think they ran around $10K for an AGO console when they first came out about 10 years ago), but it promptly sank like a stone. If I'm not mistaken, Hammond didn't show anything at the last big trade show, or at least not any AGO console organs.   Memo to "A" - quit making those damned "Princess Pedals" on your small organs.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: used organs From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 18:31:49 -0700   At 05:26 PM 5/9/1999 -0700, Bud/burgie wrote:   >Harumph! Hope they sound better than a Hammond 825. If I didn't have two Leslie >butter churns set permanently on "celeste", I'd go MAD (grin)! An 825 is fine up >to about a mezzo-forte, and the Trumpet and the Oboe are actually quite decent, >but the strings overpower the principals, and the only decent full sound is on >the SWELL with the 2' Principal and the Swell to Swell 4' drawn ... there's a >Great to Pedal, but no Swell to Great. > >My music dealer friend tells me that was exactly the reason for the 800 series >(I think they ran around $10K for an AGO console when they first came out >about 10 years ago), but it promptly sank like a stone. If I'm not mistaken, >Hammond didn't show anything at the last big trade show, or at least not any >AGO console organs.   I think you've got your company's confused. We're talking about the newer stuff from Hammond/SUZUKI...not the old Hammond Company. I think the 825 was an old technology (read CHEESY) LSI organ. We're talking DIGITAL here. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I DO have my Hammond contacts! LOL   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: used organs From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 18:13:30 -0700   Nope. I play a DIGITAL Hammond/SUZUKI 825 ... some sampled pipe voices, two sets of drawbars, AGO console, weird non-standard combination action (the general cancel takes you back to whatever was set on the stop-rail before you punched a piston, rather than cancelling everything) ... the drawbars set on the pistons, but "blind", and once a piston is punched, you can manipulate the sampled voices on the stop tabs, but not the drawbars. The only way you can tell what's set on the drawbars when a piston is activated is an LED readout at the bass end of the Great keyboard. The organ came self-contained; we added two four-channel Leslies to it.   Cheers,   Bud   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 05:26 PM 5/9/1999 -0700, Bud/burgie wrote: > > >Harumph! Hope they sound better than a Hammond 825. If I didn't have two Leslie > >butter churns set permanently on "celeste", I'd go MAD (grin)! An 825 is > fine up > >to about a mezzo-forte, and the Trumpet and the Oboe are actually quite decent, > >but the strings overpower the principals, and the only decent full sound is on > >the SWELL with the 2' Principal and the Swell to Swell 4' drawn ... there's a > >Great to Pedal, but no Swell to Great. > > > >My music dealer friend tells me that was exactly the reason for the 800 series > >(I think they ran around $10K for an AGO console when they first came out > >about 10 years ago), but it promptly sank like a stone. If I'm not > mistaken, >Hammond didn't show anything at the last big trade show, or at > least not any >AGO console organs. > > I think you've got your company's confused. We're talking about the newer > stuff from Hammond/SUZUKI...not the old Hammond Company. I think the 825 > was an old technology (read CHEESY) LSI organ. We're talking DIGITAL here. > Correct me if I'm wrong, but I DO have my Hammond contacts! LOL > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: variable-resistive key-contact From: RCARVER@SkyBest.Com (Robert Carver) Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 21:25:54 -0400 (EDT)   At 01:57 PM 5/9/1999 EDT, RMaryman@aol.com wrote:   >>There was a time that Baldwin used a variable-resistive key-contact >>system.<snip>   To which Bob Scarborough replied:   >Yeah, a LONG LONG time ago. <snip>   Gee, you sure know how to make a person feel old. I remember that when I first ran into them my only other experience with electronic organs was from reading a book on the Schober (sp?) kit organs. (They solved the same problem by placing the key contact before the formant filters, as I recall.) At the time I thought the variable-resistive key-contact was a neat-o-hi-tech-solution. My how times have changed.   I was studying composition with William Hoskins at Jacksonville University back then. He was not in favor of the tracker revival having played a tracker in his youth, the action of which he did not like. Anyway, when in a devilish mood, he once facetiously claimed the school's Baldwin was as good as a tracker because he could exercise expressive control over the articulation of the notes by controlling how he pressed the keys. And he certainly could too!   Robert Carver (rcarver@skybest.com)      
(back) Subject: Fw: St. Jacobi Kirche From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 21:19:10 -0500   >>Devils head on the Tremolo knob<< Figures.   RickV.   -----Original Message----- From: Jason D. Comet <bombarde8@juno.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, May 09, 1999 5:19 PM Subject: Re: St. Jacobi Kirche     > >>> Another thing, are the faces on the >>> stops anyone important, like composers or are they just random >>faces? >>> >>> >>Barnes has a picture of that console in his book, and says "I don't >>konw who >>Arp's friends were that are so beautifully depicted on the carved >>draw-knobs." > > >I heard that they were the faces of the pastors of the church, the >organist, and benefactors who gave money for the organ at the time the >organ was built. Plus, it had the devils head on the Tremolo knob. > > >Jason Comet > Junior in High School >bombarde8@juno.com Begining Driver - Get off the streets! > |\ Organist/Choir Director > | | 2/13 C. E. Morey/Knapton/Raville organ >O 7 member choir > >(I have to redo this address. The organ and choir arn't the same >anymore. Plus I'm not a beginning driver anymore!) > >___________________________________________________________________ >You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. >Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html >or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866] > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Suitable Beginner's Organ Music From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 9 May 1999 22:24:36 EDT   One who is beginning on the organ with no previous piano background has a eal challenge ahead. ( I know 'cause I started directly on the organ myself). I would suggest that one >could< use the David Carr Glover books at the beginning, and also the C H Trevor materials for hands alone would make some suitable starter materials. most organ methods assume a working knowledge of the keyboards, so starting from scratch, there are not as many resources. Besides, the days of the "pointer-chrrd" system died out with the home-organ industry.   Best of luck'   Rick Maryman Staunton VA