PipeChat Digest #847 - Tuesday, May 11, 1999
 
Re: The whereabouts of Barry Rose
  by "Roger Brown" <robrown@melbpc.org.au>
Re: echo division...
  by "Matthew J. Baker" <poinsettia@netxn.com>
Re: Cat in the Organ!
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
11 MAY Almanac (fwd)
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
Canterbury Cathedral
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Mental  gymnastics
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
RE: echo division...
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
stop pitch...
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Fw: Mental  gymnastics
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
The Music of Henri Mulet
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: more difficult keys
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Re: Stipend Survey
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
aesthetics (long)
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Stipend Survey
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
playing in all the keys....
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: playing in all the keys....
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
a quick correction.....
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Wedding Recessional
  by "Don Ammerman" <usna53@crosslink.net>
Wedding Recessional
  by "Don Ammerman" <usna53@crosslink.net>
Easter 6, Oak Cliff Lutheran
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Wedding Recessional
  by "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com>
Re: Wedding Recessional
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
crazy requests....
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: crazy requests....
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: The whereabouts of Barry Rose From: robrown@melbpc.org.au (Roger Brown) Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 09:19:03 GMT   On Tue, 11 May 1999 00:32:09 EDT, DavisMJJ1@aol.com wrote:   >In a message dated 10/05/99 15:36:31 GMT Daylight Time,=20 >conwayb@post.queensu.ca writes: > ><< Does anyone know where Barry Rose is now? He was at Guildford = Cathedral > when I first knew of him, then later he was at St. Paul's Cathedral, > London, but he moved from there. > >> >St Albans Cathedral I believe >   Maybe you'll all catch up some day. He RETIRED from St. Albans at the and of 1997 (his appearance at the wonderful RSCM Newcastle(NSW Australia) summer school in January 1998 was his first period of "freedom".     Roger       Roger Brown robrown@melbpc.org.au http://members.tripod.com/~RogerBrown  
(back) Subject: Re: echo division... From: "Matthew J. Baker" <poinsettia@netxn.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 03:31:30 -0700   And I'm insanely curious as to what "Anthropoglossa" is and what this particular stop sounds like. (It's an 8' reed according to the spec) And another weird stop in that particular division: Divinare...   << Subject: echo division... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 01:51:30 EDT   ......the "echo organ" on the Hazel Wright organ is also electronic. I guess that makes this organ a combo pipe/electronic.......   Carlo >>   -- < Transmit src: poinsettia@netxn.com ID1 LCARS Channel 1 Lineout > <YuSeEkMeAtNo31101993 http://www.netxn.com/~poinsettia/index.html>      
(back) Subject: Re: Cat in the Organ! From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 06:41:28 -0500   Richard Scott-Copeland wrote: > > Bruce wrote:- > > Um, would that be a "pontificat"???? Sounds like a wonderful > alternative to a church mouse.   Or would that be Pontifex Maxi-Mouse?   John Speller  
(back) Subject: 11 MAY Almanac (fwd) From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 06:13:38 -0700 (MST)     Classical Music Almanac 11 MAY   Harry Blech, CBE, founder and conductor of the London Mozart Players, died on May 9 aged 89. He was born on March 2, 1910   AN important figure in the rebuilding of British musical life after the Second World War, Harry Blech formed the London Mozart Players, and championed the classical composers of the Viennese school at a time when their Romantic successors, such as Tchaikovsky and Brahms, reigned all but supreme in the concert hall.   Recent Deaths=http://www.angelfire.com/biz/acousticdigest/cmdeaths99.html   11th MAY   1791 Birth of Bohemian composer Jan Vaclav Hugo VORISEK (Worzischek) in Wamberg. . d- Vienna, 19 NOV 1825 1884 Birth of Hungarian soprano Alma GLUCK in Bucarest, (Reba Fiersohn, real name) was in New York since five years old. Early recording soloist. (m. Efram Zimbalist, Curtis Inst, Phila) 1888 Birth of American popular music composer Irving BERLIN (Israel Balin) in Mogilev. d- NYC, 22 SEP 1989 - 101 years. 1894 Birth of American dance coreographer Martha GRAHAM in Pittsburgh. d- 1 APR 1991 1895 (1898?) Birth of American composer William Grant STILL in Woodville, MS. d- 3 DEC 1978 1902 Birth of Brazilian soprano Bidu SAYAO (Balduina de Oliveira) Near Rio de Janeiro. d- Lincolnville, ME 12 MAR 1999 1916 Composer Max Reger dies in Leipzig at age 43 of heart attack. 1938 Birth of American composer Harvey Sollberger in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 1945 Birth of New Zealand cellist and conductor Ross POPLE 1949 Birth of American soprano Ruth WELTING in Memphis. 1954 Birth of Scottish composer Judith WEIR 1961 Birth of Filipino pianist Cecile LICAD in Manila   === We promote Classical and New Age Music. Would you Please put us on your e-mail list. Promo CDs to: AcoustiCDigest/Radio Prod. P.O.Box 16221 Tucson AZ 85732 Acoustic & Classical Music Directories http://AcoustiCD.com CD sales at http://mycdstore.com _________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Free instant messaging and more at http://messenger.yahoo.com   ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Looking for a new hobby? Want to make a new friend? http://www.onelist.com Come join one of the 145,000 email communities at ONElist! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ compact disc discounts comparison shopping at:http://mycdstore.com and visit the Internet Classical Music Directory index at http://acousticd.com    
(back) Subject: Canterbury Cathedral From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 08:17:19 PDT   to 5-second reverberation time. It should be fun. I've played the Wells Cathedral organ, but Canterbury will be a first.   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Mental gymnastics From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 09:42:47 EDT   To the list, After reading much about how it seems when in a practice mode, it sometimes appears that nothing is coming together and suddenly, it does. I was wondering if someone has a cure for a problem I have or is this common. When practicing something which has four flats, you have done a fair job of it and move move on to something with three flats or four sharps. My subconscious wants to play the music as if it was written in the previous signature. This has been driving me nuts ever since I decided to return to my previous love and former avocation, organ. Does anyone have a "cure' for this or is it my mind, after many trips around the world. Sincerely, Paul P. Valtos  
(back) Subject: RE: echo division... From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 06:56:33 -0700     > > And I'm insanely curious as to what "Anthropoglossa" is and > what this particular stop > sounds like. (It's an 8' reed according to the spec) And > another weird stop in that > particular division: Divinare... >   I read on some list that it is actually a Vox Humana -- Anthro (refers to human) and glossa refers to voice. Never heard it, so this is just "hearsay"   Dennis      
(back) Subject: stop pitch... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 10:15:55 EDT   greetings,   if you play a low C with a 8/9' foot stop pulled, what do you hear. This is a pitch you don't see every day. It's obviously higher that a 1'.......That must be a pitch that only dogs and Micheal J. Fox can hear!!! I ask this because on the Hazel Wright organ, there's a stop called "none 8/9".....What is it?   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Fw: Mental gymnastics From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 09:19:25 -0500   From personal experience, I can handle flats more than sharps. Keys of G and D are ok, but anything more than two sharps, and my brain goes into overload. BOOM !! Music being mathematical, one could mentally transpose sharps into flats-- if that makes it easier. Flats, on the other hand, I can handle. When playing pieces in different keys, try taking a moment after each piece to refresh the brain from the previous piece-- hit the cranial "clear" button and restart fresh. When recitaling in different keys, make a list of the pieces and their keys for a memory boost. Does this make any sense???? HUH?????????   Rick V.     -----Original Message----- From: CHERCAPA@aol.com <CHERCAPA@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, May 11, 1999 8:46 AM Subject: Mental gymnastics     >To the list, After reading much about how it seems when in a practice mode, >it sometimes appears that nothing is coming together and suddenly, it does. I >was wondering if someone has a cure for a problem I have or is this common. >When practicing something which has four flats, you have done a fair job of >it and move move on to something with three flats or four sharps. My >subconscious wants to play the music as if it was written in the previous >signature. This has been driving me nuts ever since I decided to return to my >previous love and former avocation, organ. Does anyone have a "cure' for >this or is it my mind, after many trips around the world. Sincerely, Paul >P. Valtos > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: The Music of Henri Mulet From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 14:06:44 PDT   all 10 of them. Anyone other than me play "Carillon-Sortie"?   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: more difficult keys From: ComposerTX@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 11:25:11 EDT   Rick, don't overlook the time you could be teaching your fingers and your mind the harder keys. I always improvise in the harder keys, just because it makes me work harder. After some year of doing this, the fingers just know where to go. Regards, Danny Ray  
(back) Subject: Re: Stipend Survey From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:11:51 EDT   In a message dated 5/10/99 11:35:01 PM Central Daylight Time,=20 DavisMJJ1@aol.com writes:   << I once met with an Iraqi catholic lady who asked me to=20 play for her son's wedding. I knew the family to be extremely wealthy and=20 this was evident by the glittering diamond necklace she wore and the=20 designer=20 clothes. However, when I stated my fee, she replied: "Will you do it for=20 =A365?" to which I responded: "Madam, if you have financial difficulties I=20 will=20 gladly do it for nothing for you". Her face turned a funny sort of purple=20 and=20 I think she nearly died of embarassment. I was then surprised to receive a=20 cheque for =A3100! >>   I love it! Good job, I'll remember that one for years to come.   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church Dallas, Texas http://members.tripod.com/~organist_johng/index.html  
(back) Subject: aesthetics (long) From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 09:11:24 -0700       MWORGLBAU@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Bud and List, > > I know that I'm really behind on this one, but here we go. > > "OK, here's one for you ... at that same seminar I keep talking about (I > wish I could find the article ... Senior Moment/no filing system), one > organbuilder said that a pipe organ with ANY digital augmentation (even > 12 notes of a 32') was no pipe organ at all, and most of his peers > seemed to agree with him." > > I remember reading the article Bud. But it is interesting that the same > organbuilder that made the above comment, has in fact, though, had installed > digital 32' on an organ that he was the consultant for. I was amazed when I > read his comments. BTW, the organ I'm referring to is quite good, and the > 32's do add considerably to the instrument.   Well, economic survival IS a factor among organ-builders (grin). The client probably asked; he probably swallowed hard and complied.   > "My argument against such things is practical, rather than > aesthetic/theoretical ... NO digital component whatsoever that is now or > will be on the face of this planet in the foreseeable future will last > as long as a well-made, simple tracker pipe organ. There's no point in > building an organ that will last for a couple of hundred years if the > stop action (or the 32' stop) is gonna fail in 25 (or even 50) years." > > Granted, it's true that a simple all-mechanical action organ will last > longer than comparable electro-pneumatic or one with solid state equipment > before major repairs or component replacement is necessary. I feel that > longevity should not be the ultimate deciding factor as to how an instrument > is going to perform.   How not? At this point, a fine PIANO lasts longer than the average electro-pneumatic organ!   > We, in the organbuilding community, do try to strive for > building instruments that are going to last. But I feel that it is more > important to build instruments that will allow the organ to be as expressive > musically, offer as much variety as possible, and be controllable by the > performer as possible.   I disagree. For one thing, "control" of the instrument by means of anything other than keys, pedals, drawstops and the occasional ventil or machine stop, is a late 19th-century/20th century phenomenon, well AFTER most of the literature was written. And if 20th century composers don't understand the essential nature and limitations of the organ as a musical instrument, that's THEIR problem, NOT the organ-builder's. Messiaen can be played quite handily with ventils and a stop-assistant. Composers accept the "limitations" of orchestral instruments ... they KNOW not to write things the instruments can't DO.   > I think the industry, as a whole, has striven to make > the components and raw materials as good as possible, and continue to seek > improvement. But absolute immortality of anything, whether it be a human > being, or a pipe organ component, it will not last forever.   The organ at Sion has been rebuilt, but it's still playing (13th century).   > Therefore I feel > that we should do the best job that we can to build instruments that we last, > and yet offer the expressiveness and convenience that today's technology > offers.   Hmmm ... but the MUSIC, for the most part, doesn't require all those gadgets ... and SOME Anglican organists are among the most guilty. They forget that their beloved Parry, Stanford, Walmsley, Oldroyd, etc. was composed for and performed on organs that either still had tracker action, or tubular pneumatic action at best to slider chests on low wind-pressure, with a few fixed machine stops and/or "blind" combinations.   BTW, was Barker lever ever used in England, or did they jump straight from tracker to tubular pneumaic?   > Adding digital 32's comes down to a couple of points. Economics. A basic > 32' digital package, which offers several voices for about half of what one > 32' octave of one stop will cost. Therefore the organist can have several 32' > voices, and with the money saved, could afford another real pipe rank.   I would still opt for a finely-voiced independent 10 2/3.   > Granted it's true that it will probably need some of the components replaced > in X number of years, so what. Do you expect you car or your computer to be > around and operational 200 years from now? I don't think so. Why place a > different criteria on the organ than you would something else?   Strad violins don't become obsolete. You're comparing apples and potato(e)s (grin).   > The second > consideration is space. On more than one occasion I have been in large > buildings needing a large pipe organ to function properly for the music > required, and the architect provided slightly oversized closets for the pipe > organ. What then? Real 32's take up a lot of room, which you may not have. > Forgo the support the organ needs to keep it real?   First of all, we ALL know that the organ-builder should be involved in the planning of a building from DAY ONE. Second: we know that this seldom happens. But I think the third point is the most telling: if these folks "need" a "big" pipe organ to carry on their music program, then they should be willing to knock out some walls, build transcepts, etc. to accommodate it. But just how big an organ does a church need? There's VERY little in the literature that can't be played on a three-manual organ of 50 stops or so, if those stops are well-chosen and well-voiced.   > > > "But if it's a pipe organ, it will be built on some kind of historical > model > (probably English romantic), and I'll accept the "limitations" that will > impose." > > But do you think that it's fair to place these "limitations" on the next > organist that comes along? After all you will not be there forever!   I may not be, but the SERVICE will be. If an organist wants to play an organ built on the North German model (and the service to go with it), then he/she should look elsewhere. Granted, it should be able to play Bach (with an English accent), and I will take pains to assure that it can; but for the rest, THAT will be determined by the SERVICE, not by my whims or looking over my shoulder at who may follow me as organist/choirmaster.   I wrote extensively awhile back on the old custom of hiring an organ-builder who was also a communicant ... RC builders built for RC churches, Lutheran builders built for Lutheran churches, Skinner built for the Anglicans (grin), etc. That's why I admire John-Paul Buzard's work. He is that rara avis among organ-builders: a living, breathing, walking, talking Anglo-Catholic, and his signature instrument is in a soaring Gothic Anglo-Catholic church, which also happens to be HIS parish church. So he's not only lived the liturgy in that place, thereby knowing EXACTLY what the organ has to do; he also has to LISTEN to what he's wrought every Sunday that he's in town; AND his wife's the organist (grin). It's one thing to listen to me pontificate about the requirements for an Anglo-Catholic organ; it's quite another thing to have the conversation with a builder who is immersed in the tradition.   > Just something to think about. > > Michael R. Williamson > Williamson-Warne & Associates > Hollywood Ca. > >   There's another dimension to all this that I haven't really touched upon: when I play Bach on a really fine organ (historical or otherwise) constructed on the North German model, two things happen: first of all, the registration solves itself; secondly, all the fussy registrational shadings (1) become impossible and (2) become UNNECESSARY. On John Brombaugh's organ in Toledo, it's possible to play the entire Bach F Major Toccata AND Fugue on that very satisfying plenum with no more shading than throwing the Pedal chorus on and off for the Pedal solos (with the help of a registrant) and adding the Great and Pedal reeds for the Fugue (if your taste runs to that ... but it's not necessary ... one can listen to the coupled plena for HOURS with no changes whatsoever). Other than that, no manual changes, no monkeying around with the stops ... just play the MUSIC and let IT speak for itself, assisted by that marvelous organ.   I grew up in the generation that was just starting to experience the bracing effect of fine new tracker organs ... the Flentrop at Harvard, the Beckerath in Cleveland, the Flentrops at Oberlin, the Brombaughs in Lorain and Toledo, OH; and one cannot underestimate the influence Walter Holtkamp's organs had in "cleaning up" the playing of an entire generation. Some of his ideas about tonal design and non-encasement have been superceded, BUT ... there was NO place to hide at a Holtkamp organ, any more than there was on a good tracker. The notes and the articulation were there, or they weren't.   Well, I've got to go to work ...   Cheers,   Bud            
(back) Subject: Re: Stipend Survey From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:27:07 EDT   In a message dated 5/11/99 1:18:35 AM Central Daylight Time, mreeves@vzinet.com writes:   << The funeral homes in the area usually charge a "fee" for music...and for those whom have pre-planned funerals (made 20 years ago) they stick with the amount set aside for the music in 1979. I would have preferred the sweet potato pie. >>   Mark,   I know what you mean... I pretty much refuse to play for funeral homes in the Dallas area anymore because on average they charge the family at least $50 for the organist and on average only $35 actually makes it to the organist. That is not even worth the time it takes to get dressed and drive to the funeral home... let alone play for the darn thing (on circa 1970 electronics to boot)!   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church Dallas, Texas http://members.tripod.com/~organist_johng/index.html  
(back) Subject: playing in all the keys.... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:40:07 EDT   greetings,   a typist uses all the keys on a typewriter...a driver uses both the gas and the break pedal.....shouldn't it therefore be part of our training to be able to play freely and without hesitation in all the keys, major or minor? I know a few organists who are okay up to and including 4 sharps and 4 flats, but any more than that, and they're lost. What kind of a joke is this? They can only play the instrument if the music's not too difficult. In my very humble opinion, they should be refered to as "organ players" and not "organists". I actually know an organist whose repertory doesn't include anything with more than 4 sharps or flats, which by the way, precludes about 70% of all organ music ever written. Woe unto him. To take it one step further, that would mean that he can play the first 10 pages of "thou art the rock", because it's in f# minor (3 sharps), but he ca't play the last page in f# major (6 sharps). Hmmmmm, I wonder what he would do? End the piece right there on the C#7 chord........!!!!   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: playing in all the keys.... From: KurtvonS@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:40:47 EDT   Surely, Carlo, my friend...it's not as bad as all that??!!  
(back) Subject: a quick correction..... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:46:05 EDT   ......actually, the last chord on page 10 of "thou art the rock" isn't a C#7, but rather a Bm7 or a D6, whichever way you look at it (they're the same chord)............=)   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Wedding Recessional From: Don Ammerman <usna53@crosslink.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:34:49 -0500   I have a wedding scheduled for the evening of July 3rd. The bride would like an "Independence Day Medley". Any suggestions?   Anne Ammerman King George, VA      
(back) Subject: Wedding Recessional From: Don Ammerman <usna53@crosslink.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 12:51:04 -0500   I have a wedding scheduled for the evening of July 3rd. The bride would like an "Independence Day Medley". Any suggestions?   Anne Ammerman King George, VA      
(back) Subject: Easter 6, Oak Cliff Lutheran From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 13:00:25 EDT   OAK CLIFF LUTHERAN CHURCH Dallas, TX Rev. James C. Sherf, Pastor Rev. Gustavo Gurrero, Associate Minister John A. Gambill, Jr., Organist/Choirmaster   EASTER 6 MAY 9, 1999 Worship 10:00 A.M.   Prelude: Trio on DIX - David M. Lasky Hymn: For The Beauty of the Earth DIX Psalm: Psalm 66 "Jubilate Deo" - C.V. Stanford Anthem: If Ye Love Me - Orlando Gibbons Hymn: Come Down, O Love Divine DOWN AMPHNEY Offertory: Allegretto Pastorale - W.T. Best Hymn: Son of God, Eternal Savior IN BABILONE Postlude: Trumpet Tune and Peal - Henry Purcell  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Recessional From: "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 10:04:38 PST     One of my favorites for this time of year is actually a piano piece, Beethoven's "Variations on the 'National Song'," which is "God Bless our Native Land". It's easily adaptable to organ, not needing a lot (or any) sustain pedal to come off well.   You can add an organ Pedal part pretty easily, too, by simply doubling the lowest notes of many chords.   BTW, if you're free, I'm getting married on July 31st - - - will you be in the Portland, Oregon, area? :-)     Mark       > I have a wedding scheduled for the evening of July 3rd. The bride would > like an "Independence Day Medley". Any suggestions? > > Anne Ammerman > King George, VA       Mark Huth Rodgers Instruments, LLC mhuth@rodgers.rain.com http://www.rodgersinstruments.com   ==========================   My message above. Your response here ____________.    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Recessional From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 13:28:21 EDT   Mark,   If you feel like doing tons of practice "Variations on AMERICA" by Charles Ives is a sure bet to please the bride and the crowd. Otherwise, how about the "Liberty Bell March" by Sousa? (just joking)   Incidentally, you might be able to work "Music for the Royal Fireworks" by Handel somewhere into the service.   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church Dallas, Texas http://members.tripod.com/~organist_johng/index.html  
(back) Subject: crazy requests.... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 13:31:51 EDT   ....I just received a phone call from a bride whose wedding I'm playing this Saturday. You'll never guess what piece she wants me to play.....she want the toccata and fugue in d minor by Bach. At a wedding!!!!!!!! Man, I've had some crazy requests over the years, but never one for this piece. I can only imagine what the pastor will say to this. What have been some of the more unusual requests the rest of you have received for weddings and funerals? I was once asked to play the theme from the Donna Reed show for a funeral!!!!!!   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: crazy requests.... From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 14:05:11 EDT   In a message dated 5/11/99 12:33:07 PM Central Daylight Time, concert_organist@hotmail.com writes:   << ...I just received a phone call from a bride whose wedding I'm playing this Saturday. You'll never guess what piece she wants me to play.....she want the toccata and fugue in d minor by Bach. At a wedding!!!!!!!! >>   It sounds like she doesn't expect the marriage to last, he he he. Perhaps they're Goths? Have you seen her? White makeup and black lipstick/nail polish would be a sure sign :-)   One question - is this for the recession or procession?   John