PipeChat Digest #860 - Saturday, May 15, 1999
 
Silent Movies (x posted)
  by "STOPS" <mail@stops.org>
Fw: choir/great transfer....Rodgers/Baldwin transfer
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: playing an old Casavant..
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: looking for............
  by "jon" <jonberts@swbell.net>
Re: ..to set the record straight.....
  by "jon" <jonberts@swbell.net>
Re: mutations and French "precision"
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
...me again...
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: name that organ.....
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: ICQ?
  by "Dan Wilkinson" <dandub@gte.net>
Death Valley Scotty's organ
  by "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net>
Re: Casavant's sheeeesh...........
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Silent Move - King of Kings
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: mutations and French literature
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: mutations and French "precision"
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: ICQ?
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Silent Movies (x posted) From: "STOPS" <mail@stops.org> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 12:18:04 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_0025_01BE9ECC.FB8EA860 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   To all Scottish and British listers -   Scotland's premiere theatre organist - Larry McGuire - gave a virtuoso = performance last night on the newly installed 3/8 WurliTzer in Clydebank = Town Hall accompanying the 1925 classic - Phantom of the Opera - playing = throughout in full costume including cape, MASK, and hat.   If you weren't there, you're square, and you missed a superb evening. = He really put the organ through its paces, using almost every pipe and = percussion in his own specially arranged score (which he premiered in = 1985 during the Edinburgh International Festival).   Larry will accompany Buster Keaton's 'Sherlock Junior' on Sunday 6th = June at the New Palace Centre, Greenlaw, on the unique HiLSDON = orchestral pipe organ, and current bookings include playing for the = 'Hunchback of Notre Dame' on the Wurlitzer of New Victoria Centre, = Howden le Wear, in October.   Larry's interpretation of silent movies is always 'spot on', and is an = experience none of you should miss.   Gordon Lucas   ------=_NextPart_000_0025_01BE9ECC.FB8EA860 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D"text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1" = http-equiv=3DContent-Type> <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.00.2014.210" name=3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D2> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>To all Scottish and British listers -</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Scotland's premiere theatre organist - Larry McGuire = - gave a=20 virtuoso performance last night on the newly installed 3/8 WurliTzer in=20 Clydebank Town Hall accompanying the 1925 classic - Phantom of the Opera = -=20 playing throughout in full costume including cape, MASK, and = hat.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>If you weren't there, you're square, and you missed = a superb=20 evening.&nbsp; He really put the organ through its paces, using almost = every=20 pipe and percussion in his own specially arranged score (which he = premiered in=20 1985 during the Edinburgh International Festival).</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Larry will accompany Buster Keaton's 'Sherlock = Junior' on=20 Sunday 6th June at the New Palace Centre, Greenlaw, on the unique = HiLSDON=20 orchestral pipe organ, and current bookings include playing for the = 'Hunchback=20 of Notre Dame' on the Wurlitzer of New Victoria Centre, Howden le Wear, = in=20 October.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Larry's interpretation of silent movies is always = 'spot on',=20 and is an experience none of you should miss.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Gordon Lucas</FONT></DIV></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_0025_01BE9ECC.FB8EA860--    
(back) Subject: Fw: choir/great transfer....Rodgers/Baldwin transfer From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 06:43:08 -0500   In the 70s, Rodgers' pipes were made by Ruffati.     -----Original Message----- From: Jason McGuire <jason@johannus-norcal.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Saturday, May 15, 1999 1:23 AM Subject: Re: choir/great transfer....Rodgers/Baldwin transfer     >I am fairly sure that most of Rodgers pipes are made by Stenkens (sp) in >Holland. > >Jason >----------------------------------------------------- >Pray for peace, brotherly love and good will towards all! > >JOHANNUS of Northern California http://www.johannus-norcal.com > >---------- >>From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) >>To: pipechat@pipechat.org (PipeChat) >>Subject: Re: choir/great transfer....Rodgers/Baldwin transfer >>Date: Fri, May 14, 1999, 8:59 PM >> > >>Mark, I've been curious. Does Rodgers manufacture their own pipes? >>Especially I refer to the pipe-only installations you mentioned. Just >>something I've been wondering for a while. >>--Neil >> >> >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: playing an old Casavant.. From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 07:37:38 -0400     > >Would you be good enough to post the stoplist to the list, or let us know >where we may find the stoplist?   I have this on my website, http://www.sover.net/~popel.html   I got turned on to the old Casavants by Judy Ollikkala, who is leading an organ crawl after the AGO Region I convention this summer. She took me to several around Worcester, MA- smallish instruments from the 20's, none larger than 18-20 ranks or so, but voiced very full to fill large spaces. =46rench romantic repertoire is amazingly fun!   Paul Opel   Notre Dame R.C. Church, 50 Melville St, Pittsfield, MA Casavant Freres Ltee. #78, 1897, 2-17rks   In rear gallery of barrel-vaulted church, in two cases. On the liturgical north are the G.O. and Pedale 16'; on the south, the Rec. and Pedale 8'. The keydesk is attached to the south case.   GRAND ORGUE (58 notes) Montre 8' #1-15 in facade; common metal M=E9lodie 8' All wood; open #18 > Dulciane 8' #1-12 from Mel. Prestant 4' Common metal R=E9cit au Gr. Orgue Octave Grave (=3D Rec. to G.O. 16')   R=C9CIT (58 notes) [No pipe details avail.; sorry!] Principal 8' Bourdon 8' Gambe 8' Voix Celeste 8' From #13 > =46lu^te Harmonique 4' harm. from #25 > =46lautino 2' Mixture III rks #1: 12-19-22 #25: 8-12-15 #45: 5-8-12 Trompette 8' Hautbois 8' Tremolo   P=C9DALE 27 notes; concave, parallel pedalboard   Bourdon 16' =46l=FBte 8' Principal; facade of S case Gr. Orgue =E0 la P=E9dale Recit =E0 la P=E9dale     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: looking for............ From: jon <jonberts@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 07:35:06 -0500   Kurt vS.: Not to be nosey, but where did you get your copy of "God Rest Ye", by George Wright? When I was but just a kid, I had a Christmas album of his and it's been long gone for many years. I'd be interested in knowing if the music is in print somewhere for purchase. Was this a manuscript that you have? Please contact me.   Jon Bertschinger   KurtvonS@aol.com wrote:   > Hello Carlo; > Sorry you're taking so much flak (!), but that seems to happen to a lot of > vocal newcomers! I have a copy of the George Wright setting of "God Rest Ye, > Merry Gentlemen", and I'll be happy to copy it for you, and send it along if > you'll send me your address privately. I don't think it would FAX well, as > all I have is a very old and much used mimeo copy, myself. I like it a lot; > it differs from the recorded version, and requires a fairly hefty organ to > get the best of it. > > Kurt von Schakel > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: ..to set the record straight..... From: jon <jonberts@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 07:36:07 -0500   I don't know about others, but I've been pulling drawknobs for an awfully long time. I forgot how old I really was, until you posted below.....LOL   Jon Bertschinger   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Carl: > > Don't worry about it, this list is primarily a bunch of *od *amn *ssholes who > couldn't pull their own drawknobs if they tried.... with the exception of > Bruce C and a few others... > > J > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: mutations and French "precision" From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Fri, 14 May 1999 23:58:32 -0500   At 04:20 PM 5/14/99 -0700, you wrote: >The French (God love 'em; SOMEBODY must (grin) ) have always been VERY >precise about their registrations, from very early times right through >to the present day. ...and HE does, doesn't he? Anyway, this precision lives happily right alongside a delightful "laissez-faire" attitude towards registration and performance--again from early times right through the present day. What exactly is the French Classic "Jeux Doux"? How precise should you be in timing the addition of stops in contemporary French music? I wouldn't call the French either rigid or flexible, they manage to work both into an atmosphere of "flexible rigidity".   >More than one composer says in his preface, "if you >don't have the stops, don't play my music". Which composers, and which prefaces? Keep in mind that this is a matter of temperament that you can see in composers of every era. Some composers get really bent out of shape if you start messing around, while others like Leo Sowerby are quoted as saying "...aw, just do whatever you want."   >This takes us back to the old argument about whether or not Bach would >have used the crescendo pedal, Tuba Miraculous, etc., No, I don't think it takes us that far. We were in the middle of a friendly discussion about applying different solo colors to French Classic music, there's no reason to extend it out to the absurd extreme of adding register crescendi and antiphonal mega-honkers to Bach.   >Of COURSE you can play the de Grigny on an English Horn, but that's not >the sonority the composer called for, OR the one he had in his head. >It's also quite possible to play the Brandenbergs on a bank of >synthesizers, God help us, but why do it? Because the English Horn has a very beautiful and noble sound, while a synthesizer bank is cold, lifeless, and unmusical. Again, let's not take the argument to academic extremes...after all, we're artists aren't we? At any rate, for every composer that is obsessed with a particular sound you can find another who is pretty much indifferent. Reger enjoyed hearing his music played with terraced dynamics on a baroque instrument...Sowerby couldn't have cared less if you play the solo in "Fantasy for Flute Stops" on an Oboe...some French Classic composers leave the performer leeway by titling a movement "Recit de Voix Humaine ou Nazard". As performers, though...I hope we're not more concerned with the dialogue between composer and musician than we are with the dialogue between musician and listener. If somebody can communicate with their audience by using an English Horn in Grigny, I say "formidable"!   >There was a FASCINATING article in the Diapason (?) awhile back about >how Messiaen adapted his own registrations when he played a neo-baroque >Beckerath, but his musical language and symbolism is so complex that >only HE could do it, I'd think. These interviews and sessions are reprinted with commentary, along with the specific registrations he produced, in Almut Rossler's book on Messiaen. Interesting reading indeed. Your point about acoustics in a good one, indeed a lot of French music will simply fall flat on its face if you try to perform it in an "American Classic" acoustic. I'd add one more prerequisite to the successful performance and appreciation of Messiaen's music...Roman Catholic piety. Unlike the music of Jehan Alain, Messiaen's music is very closely tied to Catholic mysticism. To try to understand/appreciate/present it without the association of all that mystical ooga-booga is just deadly.   Robert Horton - DMA Student, University of Kansas 1603 West 15th St. #207A, Lawrence, KS 66044 http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach him to fish and he will sit in a boat all day and drink beer."  
(back) Subject: ...me again... From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Fri, 14 May 1999 23:57:11 -0500   At 06:41 PM 5/14/99 -0400, Mark85inCT@aol.com wrote: >Thank you for the wonderful response to the mutations dilemma. Yes, Skinner >developed or refined some of the most lovely sounds. The latter more than the former apparently...Barnes writes about Skinner's innovations in "The Contemporary American Organ". Seems Ernie had a bit of a habit of taking credit for being the first builder to do things when in fact he was not.   >player and the listener. Here's hoping that others will become inspired to >investigate the multitude of registration possibilities beyond what has >either been suggested on the page or passed along from teacher to pupil! Oh, they shouldn't need me to inspire them to do that! Experimentation is a natural, essential part of creativity...The only thing to realize about experimenation is that it's not a particularly "efficient" way of producing beauty. Nearly all of what you discover turns out to be garbage, but every now and again you get something worth keeping.   Robert Horton - DMA Student, University of Kansas 1603 West 15th St. #207A, Lawrence, KS 66044 http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "The journey of a thousand miles begins with a broken fan belt."  
(back) Subject: Re: name that organ..... From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 09:21:23 -0400 (EDT)   Excerpts from mail: 15-May-99 name that organ..... by "Carlo Pietroniro"@hotma > there are two movies that I recently watched that had > scenes with pipe organs in them. One was "Annie", and the other was > "Mannequin". Does anyone know what organs these were? >   Don't know about "Annie", but "Mannequin" had as its locale the Wanamaker store in downtown Philadelphia. The organ shown was indeed the famed 6-manual, but don't know whether that was the organ actually heard on the soundtrack.   Another flick, "The King of Marvin Gardens", has a scene inside the Atlantic City Convention Hall, with one of the characters seated at (talking mostly, not playing much) the 7-manual console. Again, soundtrack source unknown. Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: ICQ? From: Dan Wilkinson <dandub@gte.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 06:29:13 -0700   I have an ICQ Account........   Dan Wilkinson   Rod Murrow wrote:   > Sorry to add another "double-lister" but was wondering if any of you > listers have active ICQ accounts? It might be fun for some of us with > similar interests to carry on a more active discussion via ICQ.    
(back) Subject: Death Valley Scotty's organ From: WGWUTILS@webtv.net (Bill) Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 10:42:38 -0400 (EDT)   Hi, Listers: Remembered seeing this organ at Death Valley Scotty's Castle back in 1948 but don't think I heard it played. Does anyone out there know the details of this instrument - is it still playable? Just curious - Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Casavant's sheeeesh........... From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 11:06:41 -0400 (EDT)     >Casavants claim to be a close relative of the > old French organs but them why are there > reeds to puny? They are so smooth and > connected like a Schantz thats been around > to long. There en Chamades are HORRIBLE > (Schantz's especially). I think one of the reasons that Casavant reeds are so "puny" in comparison to "real French reeds" is that the people at Casavant know how to buid reeds for the "puny" buildings in which they must speak. If you heard authentic French reeds in most of the buildings on this continent you would be horrified. I have heard very few Casavant or Schantz reeds that were puny or even unpleasant. Unfortunately, most building in this country cannot handle a chamade reed (I have been playing in one for about two years!-- the reed is installed over the West door and is only about ten feet from the floor; the walls are only about 20' high; volume wise, the room is much too small and the proximity is far to small for a pleasant chamade).   > Our church has a Casavant that we are > enlaring to 120 ranks but we are using Ruffatti > for all of the reeds and to revoice the reeds > that are already there. I think this will truely be > a great organ! Daryl, I hate to question your judgement, but if Rufatti is your standard of excellence your in big trouble aurally! Seems the general concensus of most people I've spoken with who have heard many Rufatti organs (I've only heard, um, none personally and consider myself lucky), that Rufatti reeds (and other pipes for that matter) are not a standard to seek, and from what I've heard from CRPC and CC Rufatti are not what I would want to listen to every day, or even every week. I hope your contract is not signed; you need to do some more research!   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   When a dog wants to hang out the "Do Not Disturb" sign, as all of us do now and then, he is regarded as a traitor to his species. -- Ramona C. Albery    
(back) Subject: Silent Move - King of Kings From: Brent Johnson <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 10:16:01 -0500   - King of Kings - A silent film directed by Cecil B. DeMille Showing 8pm May 16th at The First Baptist Church of Highland IL Located on South Poplar Street   Musical score to be provided by Mark Gifford, organist of Third Baptist Church of St. Louis   Admission is free       Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com      
(back) Subject: Re: mutations and French literature From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 11:44:32 -0400 (EDT)     >The French (God love 'em; SOMEBODY must > (grin) ) have always been VERY precise > about their registrations, from very early times > right through to the present day. Much like the line of Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady" when he was singing "Why Can't the English Teach Their Children How to Speak", he said: "The French don't care what they do, actually, as long as they pronounce it properly." And the application follows closely to their organ music as well.   >This takes us back to the old argument about > whether or not Bach would have used the > crescendo pedal, Tuba Miraculous, etc., if > he'd had a Skinner organ at his disposal. As organists and performers of today, we have a double role of playing a composer's music, as far as we can determine, historically accurately, and interpreting a composer's music in the language/tonality available today. Above all, for the latter, we must use our ears. I am certain that occasionally Bach had to play an instrument that did not have the particular stops he wanted, so he had to make-do or adjust. We also must do this, but the hitch is to learn to do it within reason and good taste.   >but in the meantime, he DIDN'T have a > Skinner organ at his disposal, so I don't use > the crescendo pedal and the Tuba Miraculous > when I play Bach on a Skinner. This is a somewhat precarious position to take, especially when you must consider that Bach not only did not have a Skinner with a Tuba, neither did he have electricity to operate a blower, relays, primaries, duplex action, lights, or roto-thingies and drawbars that make a Hammond go, much less chips, save for the bovine variety. So if you're going to adhere to the above criteris of "Bach didn't have...", then you can only play his music on a completely mechanical action organ that is mechanically winded (which doesn't sound all that bad to me!). ;-)   >Of COURSE you can play the de Grigny on an > English Horn, but that's not the sonority the > composer called for..... But if you don't have a reed or cornet, a lone Principal is a grand solo stop. Better to hear the music at least played well and tastefully, although not authentically, than not at all.   >There was a FASCINATING article in the > Diapason (?) awhile back about how > Messiaen adapted his own registrations when > he played a neo-baroque Beckerath... Some of the most enjoyable playing of Messiaen I have heard was in a very reverberant room on a piano. There is a simplicity achieved that makes his music almost enjoyable to me!   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   When a dog wants to hang out the "Do Not Disturb" sign, as all of us do now and then, he is regarded as a traitor to his species. -- Ramona C. Albery    
(back) Subject: Re: mutations and French "precision" From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 08:45:04 -0700       Robert Horton wrote:   > At 04:20 PM 5/14/99 -0700, you wrote: > >The French (God love 'em; SOMEBODY must (grin) ) have always been VERY > >precise about their registrations, from very early times right through > >to the present day. > ...and HE does, doesn't he? Anyway, this precision lives happily right > alongside a delightful "laissez-faire" attitude towards registration and > performance--again from early times right through the present day. What > exactly is the French Classic "Jeux Doux"?   Flute et Bourdon de 8 pieds, according to Douglass ...   > How precise should you be in > timing the addition of stops in contemporary French music?   THERE you're absolutely right ... they engage the ventils and the wind reaches the pipes SOMEWHERE around the beat where the reeds are supposed to come on. or whatever .... but again, in those large spaces, who can tell/who cares?   > I wouldn't call the French either rigid or flexible, they manage to work > both into an atmosphere of "flexible rigidity". > > >More than one composer says in his preface, "if you > >don't have the stops, don't play my music".   > Which composers, and which prefaces?   Douglass is at the church ... I'll look.   > Keep in mind that this is a matter > of temperament that you can see in composers of every era. Some composers > get really bent out of shape if you start messing around, while others like > Leo Sowerby are quoted as saying "...aw, just do whatever you want." > > >This takes us back to the old argument about whether or not Bach would > >have used the crescendo pedal, Tuba Miraculous, etc.,   > No, I don't think it takes us that far. We were in the middle of a > friendly discussion about applying different solo colors to French Classic > music, there's no reason to extend it out to the absurd extreme of adding > register crescendi and antiphonal mega-honkers to Bach.   But where does one draw the line? A Cor Anglais is light-years away from a French classical Jeu de Tierce.   > >Of COURSE you can play the de Grigny on an English Horn, but that's not > >the sonority the composer called for, OR the one he had in his head. > >It's also quite possible to play the Brandenbergs on a bank of > >synthesizers, God help us, but why do it?   > Because the English Horn has a very beautiful and noble sound, while a > synthesizer bank is cold, lifeless, and unmusical. Again, let's not take > the argument to academic extremes...after all, we're artists aren't we?   See question above ...   > At any rate, for every composer that is obsessed with a particular sound > you can find another who is pretty much indifferent. Reger enjoyed hearing > his music played with terraced dynamics on a baroque instrument...Sowerby > couldn't have cared less if you play the solo in "Fantasy for Flute Stops" > on an Oboe...some French Classic composers leave the performer leeway by > titling a movement "Recit de Voix Humaine ou Nazard".   Ah, but the difference THERE is a composer making allowances for a very small organ that might not have a Vox Humana, and/or one in which the Vox was temporarily out of service. French romantic composers seem not to mind if you substitute the Voix Celeste for the Voix Humaine, but the EFFECT in both cases is similar, at least in a large reverberant church ... distant and spooky.   > As performers, though...I hope we're not more concerned with the dialogue > between composer and musician than we are with the dialogue between > musician and listener. If somebody can communicate with their audience by > using an English Horn in Grigny, I say "formidable"!   I'd say my FIRST job is to communicate the composer's INTENTIONS.   > >There was a FASCINATING article in the Diapason (?) awhile back about > >how Messiaen adapted his own registrations when he played a neo-baroque > >Beckerath, but his musical language and symbolism is so complex that > >only HE could do it, I'd think.   > These interviews and sessions are reprinted with commentary, along with > the specific registrations he produced, in Almut Rossler's book on > Messiaen. Interesting reading indeed. Your point about acoustics in a > good one, indeed a lot of French music will simply fall flat on its face if > you try to perform it in an "American Classic" acoustic.   > I'd add one more prerequisite to the successful performance and > appreciation of Messiaen's music...Roman Catholic piety. Unlike the music > of Jehan Alain, Messiaen's music is very closely tied to Catholic > mysticism. To try to understand/appreciate/present it without the > association of all that mystical ooga-booga is just deadly.   OOGA-BOOGA??!! I wouldn't call immersing one's self in Catholic mystical and sacramental theology ooga-booga. That's ONE of the reasons Tournemire's L'Orgue Mystique doesn't get played more often ... it was written to go hand in glove with the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, and it DOESN'T (for the most part) "work" in concert.   Now apologize for calling my faith "ooga-booga".   Bud Clark, organist/choirmaster St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church Newport Beach CA USA      
(back) Subject: Re: ICQ? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 15 May 1999 11:53:21 -0400 (EDT)     >No, not necessarily - those are just the two > that are most popular here in Oklahoma.   Oh, teehee.... and we wonder why God keeps sending all those awful tornados... um, go figure! ;-)   hehehehehe (couldnt' resist.... voluntarily going to corner to stand next to 8' C of Principal waiting to be turned into practice organ!!)   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   When a dog wants to hang out the "Do Not Disturb" sign, as all of us do now and then, he is regarded as a traitor to his species. -- Ramona C. Albery