PipeChat Digest #870 - Wednesday, May 19, 1999
 
Re: Rodgers Pipe Organs........
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Rodgers Pipe Organs........
  by "N Brown" <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Une jeste
  by <p.wilson2@juno.com>
Re: ToccataFest, Round #3
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
the outdoor Austin in the Spreckels Pavilion, San Diego
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Barbara Owen, older organs, etc.
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Rodgers Pipe Organs........ From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 01:00:34 -0400 (EDT)   Thanks, Mark, for the clarification on 2nd Baptist -Houston. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Rodgers Pipe Organs........ From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown) Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 01:22:59 -0400 (EDT)   Not to mention, Mark and Darryl, I think bashing a reputable instrument manufacturer (despite your personal opinions) in an open forum is mean-spirited and tacky. --Neil    
(back) Subject: Une jeste From: p.wilson2@juno.com Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 01:44:57 EDT   Yes, I know it probably should be on the Choral Music list, but ...   Shalom, Preston Wilson p.wilson2@juno.com   --------- Begin forwarded message ---------- >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^<   Top Ten Ways a Church Choir Director Can Tell Someone They Can't Sing   10. I'm sorry, we've run out of robes.   9. We need strong singers like you in the congregation to help them sing the hymns.   8. I wouldn't want you to strain your voice.   7. Did you know singing can aggravate sinus problems?   6. We still need good people for the handbell choir.   5. Here's a book on spiritual gifts, why don't you look through it and we can find another place in the church for you to effectively minister.   4. It's a shame composers don't write more songs in your style.   3. You have a unique range - you hit both notes well.   2. Did you know there is a new Bible study starting the same night as choir practice, I think you'd get a lot from it.   1. You have excellent posture.   For an aMEWsingly good time visit: http://www.katscratch.com   >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^< >^,,^<   © 1999 All rights reserved worldwide     --------- End forwarded message ----------   ___________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: ToccataFest, Round #3 From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 02:13:22 -0400 (EDT)     >Bruce, dear Bruce, how did I do this? --Neil um.... what?   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   If dogs could talk, perhaps we would find it as hard to get along with them as we do with people. -- Karl Capek http://www.threedog.com Three Dog Bakery    
(back) Subject: the outdoor Austin in the Spreckels Pavilion, San Diego From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 10:23:58 -0700   GBOrgan, the Principal Guest Organist, graciously supplied the following info:   "The new console was done in 1982 or 3. It was prepped for additions. In   1988 the organ got 16' 8' and 4' hooded trumpets, a big 5 rank mixture on the   Great, a IV on the Swell, and Octave 8, Choral Bass 4 and Mixture IV on pedal.   Later, SOS (Spreckels Organ Society) raised $50,000 for the 32' Bombarde, a full length boomer.   Next came the 16 level digital combination system, a big improvement over the trippers, and a virtual necessity for the success of the Summer series.   There is now a Wurlitzer type unit Tibia on its own trem. The intent was a hybrid of playing styles, but it sounds best as what it is. One CAN use it for big mutation flute solos, but it's easy to get it quivering and shaking when the tremolo is off. "   In its original incarnation (the teens, I think) it was a rather undistinguished instrument, basically a typical Austin church spec with a few traps. When I heard it the first time (just as the move to restore it was getting started), I wondered what all the fuss was about. But NOW .... oh my! It was always a fun instrument to PLAY, but less so for the listeners. One of the problems has nothing to do with the organ ... Balboa Park lies directly under the approach path to Lindbergh Field ... the softer sounds tends to get lost in the jet roar.   The pavilion has been restored to its deco splendor ... the seating in the amphitheatre has been replaced, and the seating area has been repaved with attractive bricks or stones (I forget), rather than the ugly black-top. And it DOES attract upwards of 3,000 people for the summer evening concert series ... THAT has to be something of a record for organ concerts these days.   Lyle Blackinton, who is the curator, told me that the biggest problem isn't the bugs, but the sap from certain plants in the park at certain times of the year which gets airborne somehow and tends to foul the reeds.   The whole organ is protected by a huge roll-up door when it isn't in use. It's interesting to practice, because that's done with the door DOWN and the console right under the case. It's DEAFENING. So it's hard to judge what things are going to sound like with the door UP, unless you're familiar with the organ from listening to it.   Cheers,   Bud   Bud    
(back) Subject: Barbara Owen, older organs, etc. From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 10:06:04 -0700   I wasn't aware that Barbara Owen had done any composing ... she's one of the driving forces behind the Organ Historical Society, and has edited a lot of early American (and British?) organ music ... I seem to recall reading that she was determined to lay to rest the legend that the 18th and 19th century American organ was "an instrument without a repertoire". Isn't she also a principal (tonal director?) at Fisk?   Regarding Scott's comment: I think most of us know a real bow-wow of an organ when we see one (with apologies to my Baron and other beloved dogs and their owners on these lists). THAT wasn't my point.   Scott's SPECTACULAR Kilgen at Little Flower is a PERFECT example of an earlier organ that shouldn't be TOUCHED, except for a sympathetic restoration and MAYBE updating of the console's combination action, etc. .... I don't even like to see new CONSOLES on organs like that. He's lucky that Little Flower survived unmangled, I would guess due to benign neglect and lack of money.   But if a young baroque enthusiast had gotten his/her hands on it, you probably would have seen things like strings being removed or chopped to make mutations, swell shades being carted off, breaking-glass Zimbel mixtures being added, principals being rescaled, romantic reeds being replaced with Rohrschnarren bees-in-bedpans, etc. No less an organ that Washington Cathedral was subjected to such indignities before wiser heads prevailed.   THAT was my point when I said "LIVE with an organ before you start mucking about with it." If it's a good organ, it was built to do certain things, and do them well. Learn what those things are; surprise, surprise, there's some GORGEOUS repertoire out there that was written for the orchestral organs built in the first half of this century.   It IS possible to "clean up" a romantic organ without altering the essential character, but it takes a MASTER voicer to do it. Walter Holtkamp Sr., Herman Schlicker, and Bob Sipe are three that come to mind. You may not associate the first two with romantic rebuilds, but they did some STUNNING ones.   My friend Andy has played his Schlicker for close to twenty-five years. But every time I played it, he would come running up to the console and say "HOW did you get THAT sound? I never thought of THAT." (and he's a VERY good organist). My point is that even after twenty-five years, he STILL hadn't exhausted all the possibilities of twenty-seven ranks.   We've seen several destructive cycles in American organ-building: first it was the electrocution mania ... hundreds of fine 19th century trackers were modernized beyond recognition, or discarded. Then G. Donald Harrison's work superceded that of E.M. Skinner. Then both were pulled out in favor of Holtkamps, etc. THEN the Holtkamps were pulled out in favor of trackers (!) ... and now the trackers are being replaced or augmented by (guess what!) ROMANTIC organs. I guess we've come full circle (grin).   Being a slave to fashion is a VERY expensive business in organ-building.   Cheers,   Bud