PipeChat Digest #881 - Sunday, May 23, 1999
 
Re: ZymbelStern
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: wedding funnies
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Contemporay Themes
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Pentecost at Toms River FUMC
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Contemporay Themes
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Re: Fw: Introducing a New Organ to a congregation
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Mixture thread
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Fw: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Fw: Pipedreams' query
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
The Lost Chord
  by "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net>
Re: Mixture thread
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: Fw: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING!
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Contemporay Themes
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Fw: The Lost Chord
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Moscow Organ Dedication
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Contemporay Themes
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Mixture thread
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Moscow Organ Dedication
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
More on mixtures, ACCH Kimball, etc.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Mixtures from the top
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Mixtures, continued
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: ZymbelStern From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 06:47:55 -0400   Howzabout quadraphonics- a Zimbelstern a Zimbelbow a Zimbelstarboard and a Zimbelport?   This could really get your head spinning.   Paul Opel   >To this thread: >>>I like a ZymbelStern in the Great organ, and in the Antiphonal organ I >prefer >>>ZymbelPort > >Bruce Behnke recently added > >>I would suggest that maybe a little Zymbelstarboard might also be >>appropriate but I am feeling a little sea sick at the moment. > >Getting that "Swell"ing feeling from within?? > >Stan krider > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: wedding funnies From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 06:52:40 -0500   Malcolm Wechsler wrote: "Those whom > God hath jawfully loined together, let no man put asunder."   And was one of the lections about, "And the loin shall lie down with the limb" (a line actually from one of Conrad Aiken's poems)?   John Speller St. Mark's Episcopal Church, St. Louis (where our parish newsletter, *The Lion's Tale*, is often irreverently referred to as *The Loin's Tale*.  
(back) Subject: Re: Contemporay Themes From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 13:49:10 -0500   >Re the Star Wars Theme.... a good friend of mine, during her two years as >an associate organist at St. John the Divine in NYC. frequently improvised >upon popular TV themes... she got away with it for quite awhile, until she >did a Widor-style toccata with the "Green Acres" theme rumbling in the >pedal... no one noticed except the Dean of the Cathedral! Shortly, she was >looking for another position.   Today for the children's sermon, the pastor illustrated the power of wind (as in the Holy Spirit at Pentecost) by blowing bubbles and inviting the children to do so. To play them out after it was over, I played the first few bars of the middle section of the Chopin Fantasie-Impromptu, otherwise known as "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbbles." I must have been too subtle, for to my great disappointment, no one looked up in surprise.   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Organist and Music Director, Norwood Christian Church (Cincinnati, OH) Professor of French, Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re: Pentecost at Toms River FUMC From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 13:50:50 -0500     >Our combined choirs (youth and adult) will sing: >"I Want to Be Like Jesus" > Philip Landgrave > (acappella, spiritual-type, sort of a Siyahamba style piece....=BB   Was ist Siyahamba, bitte?   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Organist and Music Director, Norwood Christian Church (Cincinnati, OH) Professor of French, Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re: Contemporay Themes From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 14:45:16 -0400       You wrote:   > children to do so. To play them out after it was over, I played the first > few bars of the middle section of the Chopin Fantasie-Impromptu, otherwise > known as "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbbles." I must have been too subtle, for > to my great disappointment, no one looked up in surprise. > > Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu > Organist and Music Director, Norwood Christian Church (Cincinnati, OH) > Professor of French, Miami University (Oxford, OH)   Hi Randolph, The middle section of the Chopin is "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows". There is a nice organ arrangement of it by Ashley Miller.   Stan Lowkis  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Introducing a New Organ to a congregation From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 14:50:30 -0400 (EDT)   > My opinion is that mixtures should add the > "bite" to the organ's sound. Should being the operative word, but DO they? Glad yours work.   bruce cornely cremona84000@webtv.net   If dogs could talk, perhaps we would find it as hard to get along with them as we do with people. -- Karl Capek http://www.threedog.com Three Dog Bakery    
(back) Subject: Mixture thread From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 15:51:34 EDT   The Mixture discussion has enlightened this fellow from the "theatre organ side of the Force". Classical organists might not know that there were very few mixtures (if any) on theatre organ stop lists, and those of us who jumped from piano bench to organ bench could not figure out their musical value. Thanks for the discussions. :-)   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Fw: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 15:24:49 -0500   Again I apologize for duplicating to both lists, but the timing is more urgent than usual. I appreciate any help.   Glenda Sutton   ---------- > From: Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> > To: PIPORG-L <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> > Subject: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING! > Date: Sunday, May 23, 1999 3:03 PM > > The priest called my home this afternoon to let me know what the family of > the deceased wanted played at the memorial service on Friday. The requests > are: Verdi's "Requiem" and the "Eroica" symphony. I will now count to ten > for you to compose yourselves. > > .. . . . > > I've never seen any transcriptions or reductions for organ of any of these. > However, because the deceased was a patron of the organ and actually gave > the mahogany for the case, and because she always sat on the back row next > to the organ and talked to me before services, I would like in some small > way to abide by these wishes (although in all the years I knew her she > never mentioned these orchestral selections, I'm sure she probably liked > them). > > I have little time between now and Friday, so any help will be appreciated. > > Glenda Sutton >  
(back) Subject: Fw: Pipedreams' query From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 15:23:50 -0500   I'm very sorry to post the same message to both lists, but I have received no confirmation that this made the other list. Thanks to anyone who can provide the information.   Glenda Sutton   ---------- > From: Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> > To: PIPORG-L <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> > Subject: Pipedreams' query > Date: Sunday, May 23, 1999 12:15 PM > > I am fortunate to hear parts of Pipedreams each Sunday from 6:30 to 8:00 > a.m. When I say "parts", I mean that the particular station's signal is > not generally strong enough for me to hear the whole program - it fades in > and out, and there are bleedovers from other stations, etc. > > Today's program was the airing of the 5/10/99 program #9919, "Back Before > Bach". I have finally arrived at the question - there was a very > contemporary-sounding selection about 45 minutes or more into the program > that started out whimsical enough, then became increasingly more agitated > and discordant, then of course faded out before I could find out what it > was! Was this by chance the Gawthrop Allegro Ritmico? If not, what? > > Secondly, I was interested in discovering what the piece was of which an > excerpt was playing after Mr. Barone's closing remarks. > > If anyone, including Mr. Barone, could be so gracious as to answer these > questions, he/she shall be placed on my list of persons to whom I am > forever grateful. > > Regards on Whitsunday (were you all good and played your Veni Creator > Spiritus?), > > Glenda Sutton > > >  
(back) Subject: The Lost Chord From: WGWUTILS@webtv.net (Bill) Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 16:48:51 -0400 (EDT)   Just saw and heard Diane Bish play this piece (Joy of Music) on the Ruffatti organ in Fort Lauderdale. While quite good, it just didn't seem to build up to the full-organ power as did the old Jesse Crawford 78-rpm version (or at least as I remember it and try to duplicate it) - or am I enhansing this old record in my memory as I haven't heard it in at least 30-years or more..... Bill Winchester    
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture thread From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 14:09:03 -0700   At 03:51 PM 5/23/1999 EDT, KriderSM@aol.com wrote: >Classical organists might not know that there were very=20 >few mixtures (if any) on theatre organ stop lists,<snip>   Try none, save for a few "hybrid" concert instruments, (notably the huge Kimball in the ACCH ballroom, and RCMH...but I think those are from a unit...ugh!)   > and those of us who jumped=20 >from piano bench to organ bench could not figure out their musical value.= =20   Mixtures are simply logical extensions of the unison harmonic series. Builders way back when, way before Helmholtz and Fourier, knew what the harmonic series was, and, (IMHO) knew the psychoacoustic law that "brighter always sounds louder, without being louder". Due to limited wind availability in those days, one HAD to have upperwork and mixtures simply to provide dynamics.   Later, after Hope-Jones tried his "let's put everything at 8' and make it all not blend" farce, the value of upperwork in providing clean, clear rendition of contrapuntal work was finally realized (=E0 la G. Donald Harrison) around 1930. Other builders, notably on the Continent, never really abandoned upperwork entirely, but it was quite subdued in the late Romantic organ. The good English builders did likewise, and properly never abandoned the principle chorus or its supporting upper work. (Hope-Jones was English, too, but that's not important right now.)   Of course, Hope-Jones' ideas came to fruition successfully in the WurliTzer (and Barton, Marr and Colton, Page, Compton, et al) "unit orchestras", and opened up a whole new world for the pipe organ. One could say that after the unit orchestras were developed, ALL types of music were now able to be successfully played on the organ, albeit on different ones at different= times!   Attempts have been made over the years to hybridize large instruments, the largest such experiment being ACCH's Midmer-Losh. However, when an attempt is made to blend both schools of voicing together at the same time, chaos absolute reigns. Each has their place, and their own standards. Happy the all-around organist that could have an instrument that had BOTH schools available from a single console!   Just my 2=A2's worth...change provided upon request.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING! From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 14:09:05 -0700   At 03:24 PM 5/23/1999 -0500, Glenda wrote: >Again I apologize for duplicating to both lists, but the timing is more >urgent than usual.<snip>   ....and you want it WHEN????   Goooood LUCK!    
(back) Subject: Contemporay Themes From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 18:05:01 EDT   In the event she recorded any of those arrangements, I will purchase one on CD. :-) My kind of pipe organ music!   Stan Krider   Sand Lawn recently stated: >Re the Star Wars Theme.... a good friend of mine, during her two years as >an associate organist at St. John the Divine in NYC. frequently improvised >upon popular TV themes... she got away with it for quite awhile, until she >did a Widor-style toccata with the "Green Acres" theme rumbling in the >pedal... no one noticed except the Dean of the Cathedral! Shortly, she was >looking for another position.  
(back) Subject: Fw: The Lost Chord From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 17:06:34 -0500   Jess did a fine rendition of it years ago on the Dick Simonton Grande Wurli. and so did Dick Liebert on the RCMH Wurli.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Bill <WGWUTILS@webtv.net> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, May 23, 1999 3:49 PM Subject: The Lost Chord     Just saw and heard Diane Bish play this piece (Joy of Music) on the Ruffatti organ in Fort Lauderdale. While quite good, it just didn't seem to build up to the full-organ power as did the old Jesse Crawford 78-rpm version (or at least as I remember it and try to duplicate it) - or am I enhansing this old record in my memory as I haven't heard it in at least 30-years or more..... Bill Winchester     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Moscow Organ Dedication From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 17:26:57 -0500   Hi Listers and Chatterererers... Well, today (23.May.99.) we had the dedication of our Wicks 2/4 organ at Moscow Christian Church in Moscow, IN. A short Bible verse was offered, some history of the instrument -being in a church that blew up from a gas explosion, everyone standing to sing The Old Hundreth, and then a short explanation of how the instrument works. Yours' truly at the console demonstrating each voice while another person explained the different pipes. A closing prayer was offered, then playing time began. I played Fountain Reverie by Percy Fletcher... other pieces played by others were:   Alla Siciliana -Guilmont Prelude on Hyfrydol -arr. Mark Kellner Ancient Of Days -Wilson Amazing Grace -arr. Lane Smith Christmas Landscapes -Ellen Jane Lorenz Sonata De Clarines -Antonio Soler   The little Wicks performed wonderfully and many compliments were made. Several organists and music lovers from the surrounding towns graced our pews.   Refreshments followed.   Then it began to rain.     Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net Cowboy philosophy - Don't squat while wearing spurs.      
(back) Subject: Re: Contemporay Themes From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 18:39:22 -0500     >Hi Randolph, > The middle section of the Chopin is "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows". >There is a nice organ arrangement of it by Ashley Miller. > >Stan Lowkis >   Hey! You're right! I don't know why I always confused the two songs in my mind. I do play the Chopin, it being one of the very few piano pieces I can still play from memory. But I did play "I'm Forever Chasing Bubbles" this morning, not the Chopin/Rainbow thing. The latter would maybe work, though, if the sermon touched upon Noah and the rainbow theme.   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Organist and Music Director, Norwood Christian Church (Cincinnati, OH) Professor of French, Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture thread From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 17:39:56 -0500   At 2:09 PM -0700 5/23/99, Bob Scarborough wrote: >At 03:51 PM 5/23/1999 EDT, KriderSM@aol.com wrote: >>Classical organists might not know that there were very >>few mixtures (if any) on theatre organ stop lists,<snip> > >Try none, save for a few "hybrid" concert instruments, (notably the huge >Kimball in the ACCH ballroom, and RCMH...but I think those are from a >unit...ugh!)   I cannot speak for RCMH but i can assure you that the Mixtures in the ACCH Ballroom are not from units. There is a V Mixture - 305p (15-19-22-26-29) and a VII Grand Mixture - 511p (12-15-17-19-22-26-29) Both of them are voiced on 10" of wind.   Actually, you might be suprised that out of the total of 55 ranks in the Ballroom Kimball, only 23 of them are unit ranks - under half of the total ranks in the instrument.   For more information on the Kimball in the ACCH Ballroom and for the rank list, please check out our web site at http://www.acchos.org and click on the photo of the Kimball console at the bottom of the page.   >Attempts have been made over the years to hybridize large instruments, the >largest such experiment being ACCH's Midmer-Losh. However, when an attempt >is made to blend both schools of voicing together at the same time, chaos >absolute reigns. Each has their place, and their own standards. Happy the >all-around organist that could have an instrument that had BOTH schools >available from a single console!   I have forwarded on this posting to Stephen Smith, President of the ACCHOS and probably the most knowledgable person about the Midmer-Losh for his views which I will send to the list when I get them.   David   ********************** David Scribner Director of Communications Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society http://www.acchos.org/ info@acchos.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Moscow Organ Dedication From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 18:46:23 EDT   Congrats Rick! I know you have worked on this project for quite a while,,,at least as long as I have been on this list. The listed program sounded very nice I am sure, and it is just another example that bigger is NOT necessary,,NOR absolutely needed. I am sure that your "country" church is just as happy, if not more, than a "city" church dedicating a 100r behemoth, and breaking the bank on it so it wont have any maintenance or tuning for years. Cheers, ---Roc  
(back) Subject: More on mixtures, ACCH Kimball, etc. From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 16:09:40 -0700   At 05:39 PM 5/23/1999 -0500, David Scribner wrote:   >I cannot speak for RCMH but i can assure you that the Mixtures in the ACCH >Ballroom are not from units.<snip>   Yes, I'm aware of the Mightiest of Kimball's nature, as it is well-publicized. The possibility of "unit mutation mixtures" exists on the RCMH Wurlie, and I should have clarified as such.   >>Attempts have been made over the years to hybridize large instruments, the >>largest such experiment being ACCH's Midmer-Losh. However, when an >>attempt is made to blend both schools of voicing together at the same time, >>chaos absolute reigns.<snip>   Here, I'm speaking of mixing the voices of the two divergent schools together at the same time. Woe be to the audience having to suffer through hearing a proper chorus of diapasons with appropriate upper work, mixed with such solo-only ranks as a Diapason Phonon, Post Horn or Tibia Clausa!   Again, I'm aware of the Midmer-Losh's most imposing specification. It's obvious from it that facilities were made by Senator Richards to accommodate as many schools of organ thought as was/is humanly possible. As a member of the ACCHOS, I cannot wait until the instrument is restored! What a treasure awaits...from principal choruses complete with mixtures, to "wall of sound" string divisions to the liquid Tibia Clausa and thence to the grandest of Ophecleides, this baby's got EVERYTHING! There might even be a kitchen sink in one of those eight huge chambers....   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Mixtures from the top From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 18:20:21 -0700   OK, this is gonna be technical; some of it's fact; some of it's opinion. If you're interested, read on.   The medieval organ was one huge mixture ... no stops; everything played all the time. Maybe somebody else can come up with how they arrived at octaves and fifths (mostly) as the pitches to be included ... probably observed it in nature, and/or by tinkering.   So ... when you pressed a key (or, more like WHOMPED it ... they were wide enough and heavy enough that they had to be played with the FIST, and the organist was called "pulsator organum" ... "organ-beater" ... don't GO there! (grin) ) you got something like:   16 narrow-scale (16 wide-scale) 8 narrow-scale 8 narrow-scale ( 8 wide-scale) 4 narrow-scale 4 narrow-scale ( 2 2/3 narrow scale) 2 narrow-scale 2 narrow-scale 1 1/3 narrow-scale 1 narrow-scale 2/3 narrow-scale 1/2 narrow-scale   and on up into the stratosphere as far as they could go.   Now, obviously, they discovered that there was an upper limit to how high they could take the pitches, so at a certain point each rank would "break", or jump back down an octave, so by the time you got to the top of the keyboard, you had a huge pile of 8 - 4 - (2 2/3) - 2 pipes speaking, since all the higher-pitched ranks had "broken back" two or three times, to the point that they had all arrived at 8 - 4 - 2, the top "C" of a 2' stop being in practice about as high as anybody but dogs can hear.   This huge undivided organ was called "blokwerk" because it was one BIG chunk of sound (grin). It's recorded that up to forty ranks were included; the medieval organ at Winchester Cathedral is said to have been audible from a mile away. Not very subtle (grin).   When sliders were invented, stops were used to "stop" some of the ranks from playing all the time by pulling the slider out of alignment with the wind channel so the air couldn't get to that set of pipes, sorta like a grid. So actually our modern stops are backwards ... pulling a stop in a late medieval organ STOPPED something from playing, rather than activating activating it.   But organists being hide-bound traditionalists (the more things change ....), some of the ranks were left in their old blokwerk form. There are still some old organs in Germany and Holland where the Great principal chorus is something like:   Praestant 16 Octave 8 II ranks Octave 4 II ranks Mixture X-XV ranks (yes, that's 10-15 ranks)   The doubling of the 8 - 4 - 2 pitches persisted right through the baroque era in Germany, at least; John Brombaugh was probably the first modern tracker builder to revive it; it's also possibly where the English got the custom of including a First and Second Open Diapason in their organs.   Over time, the big mixture came to be divided into Mixture and Scharf, or Fourniture and Cymbal, or Full Mixture and Sharp Mixture, depending on your country of residence. We don't know much about whether the higher-pitched mixture was ever used alone ... it could simply be drawn with the main mixture, or not ... an early version of Tutti I and Tutti II, no doubt (grin).   By the time you arrive at the high baroque, organ-builders have figured out that these things have uses other than just making noise ... reinforcing certain harmonics, and strengthening the weak trebles of the flue and reed stops. They also make the bass end of the keyboard brighter and the treble end broader, because of the number of high pitches in the bass and low pitches in the treble. Those fire-eating French baroque Cornets were built to shore up the weak trebles of the Clairons, among other things. Yeah, yeah, a Cornet isn't strictly a mixture ... so sue me (grin)!   It is said that Silbermann could throw down his cane in a church, listen to the echo, and decide on the spot (1) the composition of the mixtures and (2) the scaling of all the pipes. Would that SOME of our modern builders could do the same (grin).   By the late 19th century, Audsley saw mixtures as a device to color and reinforce the harmonics of the 8' stops, rather than as an integral part of the chorus. That's why so many 19th century and early 20th century organs have Dulciana or Dolce Cornets ... they were supposed to color, rather than add volume or brilliance. Audsley also advocated something called a Compensating Mixture which did basically the same thing, if memory serves.   Mixtures never died out entirely, even during the depths of the orchestral period. E.M. Skinner and Hook and Hastings built more-or-less normal mixtures, albeit low-pitched and softer, at least in their larger instruments. Hook and Hastings' conservatism in tonal matters (and the Crash of '29) probably contributing to their extinction. They built slider chests with electric pull-downs right to the end, if I'm not mistaken.   The first wave of the baroque revival was pretty awful. Builders copied the compositions and scales of European mixtures, but then planted them on pitman chests on 10-15 inches of wind. The result would etch glass at fifty paces. Not to mention that a mixture in a reverberant European church seating upwards of 5,000 people is gonna sound REAL different in a dead American church seating 500 people (!).   What is a Cornet? Technically, a "compound stop", rather than a mixture, because it was made up of a combination of ranks of different scales, thusly:   8' Bourdon (built as a metal chimney flute, usually) 4' Prestant - narrow-scale 2 2/3' Nasard - wide-scale 2' Quarte de Nasard - wide-scale 1 3/5' Tierce - wide-scale   Big French organs also included:   5 1/3' Gros Nasard 3 1/5' Gros Tierce   and the result in the bass end of the keyboard was hair-RAISING ... all those purely-tuned thirds clashing and clanging away.   A Petit Cornet might be only the 2 2/3 - 2 - 1 3/5 ranks, leaving off the larger (and more expensive) 8 and 4 ranks; or it might be done for the sake of space in the early short-compass Recits.   OR the Cornet could start out at 2 2/3, add the 4 rank in the next octave, and finally the 8 rank at middle C ... then it would be designated Cornet III-V ranks.   By contrast, a German Sesquialtera II ranks was built of two NARROW-scale ranks: 2 2/3 and 1 3/5. There's another variation, Tertian or something like that, with the quint rank on top: 1 3/5 - 1 1/3 ... sounds kinda weird.   Some modern builders build Pedal Reed Cornets based on the 32' harmonic series (16 - [12 4/5] - 10 2/3 - 8 - 6 2/5 - 5 1/3 - 4, etc.) to try and make a 32' resultant reed tone ... most of 'em you DON'T wanna hear, mostly because the pitches are usually borrowed from elsewhere ... to build an independent 32' Cornet of VII or more ranks would probably cost as much as a half-length REAL 32' stop.   Corrections, additions, etc. welcome ...   Cheers,   Bud            
(back) Subject: Mixtures, continued From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 23 May 1999 18:36:06 -0700   Forgot a few things ...   Mixtures also do something else ... buildings resonate at certain frequencies ... we've all experienced THAT ... low B Flat or whatever on a big 16' Bourdon or Open Wood sets the whole building to vibrating.   But a good voicer can also listen to a building and discover what pitches are weaker, and scale and voice and compose his mixtures to compensate for that, so that certain pitches don't disappear.   That's a VERY good reason for doing final voicing in the church, rather than on the voicing machine in the shop. You can't tell until the organ's set up EXACTLY what the pipes are gonna do in the room.   In general, the deader the room, the weightier the 8' stops need to be .... and higher pitches have to be handled VERY delicately, or they scream. That's something that 19th century American builders understood very well ... and that's why 19th American organs sound so warm and friendly, even when they're in dead rooms.   Cheers,   Bud