PipeChat Digest #885 - Tuesday, May 25, 1999
 
Re: Mixture thread
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
[musiclassical] 25 May Almanac (fwd)
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
Re: Actual Facts - Text Edition
  by "Adam and Christine Levin" <levins@westnet.com>
Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition
  by "Adam and Christine Levin" <levins@westnet.com>
Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition
  by "Adam and Christine Levin" <levins@westnet.com>
Re: Fw: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING!
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Fw: The Lost Chord
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Joel Gary at Mundelein Theatre Organ
  by "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Fw: The Lost Chord
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Salaries (Re: Job in NJ)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
The Lost Chord
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: The Lost Chord
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: The Lost Chord
  by "Dan Wilkinson" <dandub@gte.net>
Re: Mixture thread
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Mixtures from the top
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
The Lost Chord
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: Mixtures from the top
  by "Bud/burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Fw: Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: The Lost Chord
  by <Icorgan@aol.com>
Re: ZymbelStern
  by <Icorgan@aol.com>
Fw: ZymbelStern
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Mixtures from the top
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Mixture thread From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 06:24:50 -0500   Forwarded Message from Stephen Smith , who is not on this list.   ************************************************ Bob Scarborough is quite correct when he writes:   >Attempts have been made over the years to >hybridize large instruments, the largest >such experiment being ACCH's Midmer-Losh.   I largely agree that the instrument is an experiment, and for many, many reasons: the 64-foot stop, the large scales, the 100-inch reeds and other high wind pressures, etc. and, yes, the hybrid design. However, *I* would probably describe it as an "eclectic design". A number of schools are embodied in the ACCH instrument, ranging from Baroque principles through to some of Hope-Jones' ideals. However, I personally would not necessarily agree Bob's later statement:   >when an attempt is made to blend both >schools of voicing together at the same >time, chaos absolute reigns.   The ACCH organ - despite its various design schools - was conceived as one instrument; built as one instrument; and remains one instrument. Although its designer, Emerson Richards, embraced a number of design schools, it is reasonably clear that he believed they all contributed to the whole. The Great-Solo and Swell-Choir departments which we, in this day and age, tend to think of as theater organ sections were actually designed to be ancillary organs providing materials not available on the main departments. For example, few people would deny that orchestral reeds such as clarinets, oboes, etc. are of value on a Solo organ and, yet, they are not to be found on the ACCH's Solo but on the ancillary Solo-Great (which is duplexed, stop-for-stop, from the Great-Solo).   It should also be borne in mind that Richards' probably believed he was *improving* upon the Baroque school, etc., and bringing the ancient organ into a new order. For whilst he embraced the tonal structures of the Baroque, he believed that tracker action and chiffing pipes were a limitation imposed by a past technology. He would have none of such things in *his* instruments.   Richards is on record as having said that "all departments [on the ACCH organ] have a complete ensemble" and that "some...have been augmented by unit voices of a character that do not affect the ensemble." This is actually untrue. In the 'straight' scheme (218 voices), many departments have no sub-unison or mutation stops and, therefore, the unit scheme (96 voices) is heavily relied upon to contribute these pitches. In fact, the straight scheme consists of (just!) six 16-foot stops, 135 8-foots, 31 4-foots, a dozen 2-foots, 10 mutations at various pitches, and 24 mixtures comprising 130 ranks. However, *65* of the unit stops include 16-foot octaves and, therefore, a good case could be made for suggesting that the unit scheme is actually more interesting and comprehensive than the straight one.   It may appear that I'm straying from the original subject matter, but here's the crux: The ACCH organ was designed as what Richards' called a "combination organ" (although the title was changed to "augmented organ" by T. Scott Buhrman, the editor of The American Organist). It was an instrument which *needed* both straight and unit material to make up the whole. In this respect, Richards' "combination organ" title was correct (Buhrman's was wrong), but some of his writing about the instrument (such as that quoted above) suggests that it *was* an "augmented organ". It wasn't/isn't!   In my view, it seems that Richards simply set out to design an organ for the ACCH. To the best of my knowledge, he never described it as Classical, Romantic, Symphonic, Theater, or Baroque and yet we, with the benefit of hindsight, can describe it as all of these things (in later years, Richards did attach some of these titles to the instrument but he did so *after* he had designed it and usually in an attempt to take credit for some "innovation" or other).   The fact of the matter is that the ACCH organ is so vast and has so many resources that one could persuasively argue a case for or against almost any aspect of it. The above is merely my general summary, based upon more than 20 years of studying the instrument; its design and designer; and other related matters. Perhaps the fact it is open to so much interpretation is what makes it one of the world's most versatile organs?   To summarize... IMHO, in the case of the ACCH organ, "hybridization" (if there is such a word?) works, and it was intended to do so from the outset.   With best wishes to all, Stephen D. Smith President - Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society, Inc.  
(back) Subject: [musiclassical] 25 May Almanac (fwd) From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 06:04:56 -0700 (MST)       <LI>1863 Birth of French song and opera composer Camille ERLANGER   <LI>1869 Vienna State Opera House opens with Mozart's 'Don Giovanni' <LI>1870 In Paris, FP of Leo Delibes ballet 'Coppelia' <LI>1878 In London, at Opera-Comique, FP of Gilbert and Sullivan's 'H.M.S. Pinafore' <LI>1898 Birth of Russian composer and pianist Mischa LEVITSKI <LI>1900 Death of Italian singer Giuseppe del Puente in Philadelphia. Foremost baritone as Figaro and his Toreador <LI>1910 In Paris, Claude Debussy gives FP of his piano Preludes with 'Voiles' <LI>1929 Birth of American soprano Beverly SILLS (Belle Miriam "Bubbles" Silverman) in Brooklyn, NYC. Director NY Civic Opera <LI>1934 Death of English composer Gustav Holst in London <LI>1948 In Cambridge, FP of Benjamin Britten's 'The Beggar's Opera' based on John Gays work. (AT Arts Theater) <LI>1974 Death of English organist Arnold Grier at Great Bookham, Surray. Age 86.</UL></H3>   === GET our PLAYlists: http://www.angelfire.com/biz3/alm/lb.html AcoustiCDigest/Radio= P.O.Box 16221 Tucson AZ 85732 Music Directories: http://AcoustiCD.com CD sales: http://mycdstore.com _________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com     ------------------------------------------------------------------------ It's finally here! What's your opinion? http://www.onelist.com Create a Star Wars discussion group at ONElist. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ compact disc discounts comparison shopping at:http://mycdstore.com and visit the Internet Classical Music Directory index at http://acousticd.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Actual Facts - Text Edition From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 10:01:59 -0400 (EDT)   On Tue, 25 May 1999 p.wilson2@juno.com wrote: > NAME A ROCK MUSICIAN WHO COMPOSED A PIANO CONCERTO > Keith Emerson of Emerson, Lake and Palmer composed a piano concerto that > is actually rather good. But so far the only recording of it is his > own...on the original "Works" album.   And it is, let me tell you, a rather, um, interesting work. If you like Prokofiev and Mussorgsky, you'll like it.   The album is technically called "Works, Volume I", it's a two-disk set, and Piano Concerto No. 1 is the first piece on it.   -Adam      
(back) Subject: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 09:17:31 -0500   Keith also did a classical organ bit on one of their albums -recorded in England, I believe. Quite impressive.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 9:03 AM Subject: Re: Actual Facts - Text Edition     >On Tue, 25 May 1999 p.wilson2@juno.com wrote: >> NAME A ROCK MUSICIAN WHO COMPOSED A PIANO CONCERTO >> Keith Emerson of Emerson, Lake and Palmer composed a piano concerto that >> is actually rather good. But so far the only recording of it is his >> own...on the original "Works" album. > >And it is, let me tell you, a rather, um, interesting work. If you like >Prokofiev and Mussorgsky, you'll like it. > >The album is technically called "Works, Volume I", it's a two-disk set, >and Piano Concerto No. 1 is the first piece on it. > >-Adam > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 10:34:20 -0400 (EDT)   On Tue, 25 May 1999, VEAGUE wrote: > Keith also did a classical organ bit on one of their albums -recorded in > England, I believe. Quite impressive.   There's a piece on their self-titled album called "3 Fates", and the first, "Clotho", says "Royal Festival Organ" next to it. I haven't heard the piece.   -Adam      
(back) Subject: Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 09:41:26 -0500   Adam... You shook the cobwebs in my dusty brain.... Clotho. I don't have the album, but heard it when it came out. Once again, very impressive and surprising coming from a rock band.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 9:37 AM Subject: Re: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition     >On Tue, 25 May 1999, VEAGUE wrote: >> Keith also did a classical organ bit on one of their albums -recorded in >> England, I believe. Quite impressive. > >There's a piece on their self-titled album called "3 Fates", and the >first, "Clotho", says "Royal Festival Organ" next to it. I haven't heard >the piece. > >-Adam > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 10:50:37 -0400 (EDT)   On Tue, 25 May 1999, VEAGUE wrote: > Adam... You shook the cobwebs in my dusty brain.... Clotho. I don't have > the album, but heard it when it came out. Once again, very impressive and > surprising coming from a rock band.   http://www.cddb.com/ -- fantastic resource for finding recordings, titles, album contents, etc.   I wouldn't really call them a rock band. Rock is too broad a term. Along with Yes and a few others, they were known as prog rock (progressive) or orchestral rock. The keyboard talents of Rick Wakeman and Keith Emerson are phenomenal. Both are classically trained pianists.   -Adam      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Need help urgently - STOP LAUGHING! From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 09:15:41 -0700   Play the CDs ... bring your own boom-box, if necessary.   Cheers,   Bud   vjmoore wrote:   > f > >> the deceased wanted played at the memorial service on Friday. The > >requests > >> are: Verdi's "Requiem" and the "Eroica" symphony. I will now count to > >ten > >> for you to compose yourselves. > > Glenda, > > There is a gorgeous section of the libera me from the Verdi for soprano solo > and 4 part chorus. I remember vividly the funeral of my first piano > teacher, who collapsed at the console of my parish church at the age of 30. > Died three days later. He was much loved and the Milwaukee Bel Canto chorus > and its director's wife combined forces to wrench every last tear from the > eys of all who were there. > > As for the Bethoven, you're on your own. > > Good luck, > > JC Moore > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: The Lost Chord From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 09:39:32 -0700   I play it out of an old vocal collection ... "50 Sacred Songs You Love To Sing" or something like that. I vaguely recall it being in a VERY old organ collection when I was in high school (back when dinosaurs roamed the fertile plains), but the book is long-gone, as is the title. I'm sure one of the on-line music stores could find an arrangement for you.   Cheers,   Bud   CHERCAPA@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Bud, Do you know where I can get a copy of the Lost Chord. Sincerely, > Paul > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Joel Gary at Mundelein Theatre Organ From: "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 11:49:15 -0500   On the 22nd of May CATOE members and friends gathered at the Seminary Auditorium of The University of St. Mary of the Lake in Mundelein, Illinois to hear a program on the 4/19 Howell-WurliTzer (mostly WurliTzer) Theatre pipe organ played by Joel Gary. Many of you may know of him as the Gary of The Smith and Gary Pipe Organ Company of Grand Rapids, Michigan. As well as being a organ technician, he is a church organist and talented theatre organist. He opened his program by saying he doesn't play much theatre organ, but it was soon apparent that he hadn't lost his theatre playing edge from his days of sharing console duties with Charles Balogh in the final days of "Good Time Charley's" pipe organ equipped eatery in Grand Rapids. The program opened as the console rose on the Barton lift with a rousing version of "Cheek to Cheek" Although he threatened us with a Bach program as he regularly plays more church music , he continued his program with "Where or When" where he made good use of lush strings on the organ and the fine Deagan Vibra-Harp from the WGN pipe organ. Next he did a novelty number called "Jack in the Box" composed by the same musician responsible for Dizzy Fingers. Next we were treated to some Rogers and Hammerstein with a medley for "Oklahoma" which included "Oklahoma" of course along with "Oh What a Beautiful Morning" and "Surrey with the Fringe on Top". He continued on with a jazzy version of "Swinging on a Star". More Richard Rogers followed with a selection from the "Victory at Sea Suite" which is more commonly know as "No Other Love". His next offering was what he called an old theatre organist "War Horse"...."GRANADA" which he plays 'cause he just plain likes it. In respect for his surroundings at the seminary he played a special arrangements of his of "Onward Christian Soldiers". Next he played some more show tunes, this time the lovely "I Have a Love" and "One Hand, One Heart" from Westside Story. To close the program he finished up with a march, "Under The Double Eagle"...By popular request he returned to the console and played "Londonderry Air". It is always a treat to hear the Mundelein organ and with an accomplished artist at the keyboard makes it a special occasion. The following day Joel headed North and presented a well received program for the Dairlyland ATOS Chapter on Jim & Dorothy Peterson's organ in Menominee Falls, Wisconsin.   This review is courtesy of The Vox Catoe. The former "Good Time Charley's" WurliTzer remained in Grand Rapids and can be heard regularly at the Van Andel Museum Center in Grand Rapids. More information on the Van Andel Museum can be found at: http://www.grmuseum.org/wurlitzer.htm More information on the Mundelein Organ can be found at: http://theatreorgans.com/il/mundelein/ and Jim & Dorothy Peterson's organ at: http://theatreorgans.com/wi/menomoneefalls/   jch      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: The Lost Chord From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 12:07:49 -0500   A (probably simplified) version is also included in one of the Reader's Digest Song books, either the very first one issued, or the one of religious/spiritual songs.      
(back) Subject: Salaries (Re: Job in NJ) From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 13:58:32 EDT   In a message dated 5/25/99 12:51:01 PM Eastern Daylight Time, P_Weiglein@fccc.edu writes:   << <snip> If they wish to maintain the level of music ministry that has grown over the past 9-1/2 years of my direction and 30+ years of previous directors, I'm afraid they're going to have to invest more money. The pay is REALLY low. Really. It's a matter of priorities.   Strange, but unfortunately this "plague" seems to have hit the NJ/NY (and immediate NYC metropolitan) area very hard.   I was at a church in Hackensack, Second Reformed Church, where I was very happy. In years past (there's the key- when people attended church more often and in far greater numbers) Secind was THE church in the area. Big church, beautiful facilities (with 14 signed Louis Tiffany windows), a marvelous and gutsy Austin pipe organ and a very fine semi-professional choir.   I moved there, took the position, enjoyed it very much, but even after being told at my interview that they wished to make the music director full time- they did not do so and, in fact, went out of their way NOT to do so. The pastor, of coursem could receive an astronomical salary, and projects that HE desired were seen through to completion.   I think it was a case, again, of "music vs. the pastors ego." Which will win? And God forbid that the music get at LEAST the attention the sermons do.   Oh well. Life goes on. I am so happy to be back in my own denomination with a structure and administration that I understand and work well with.    
(back) Subject: The Lost Chord From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 14:05:48 EDT   .........I have this arranged for solo organ as well as the original score with the words.......who wants a copy?   Carlo     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The Lost Chord From: "STRAIGHT " <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 14:28:41 -0400   What do you have Carlo? I would like to see the organ arrangement, if it's old enough to be out of copywrite. I have a real old one with the words. I think it's for piano, but I just kind of rearranged it as I went along on the organ. Diane S. (straight@infoblvd.net)    
(back) Subject: Re: The Lost Chord From: Dan Wilkinson <dandub@gte.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 11:40:02 -0700   Carlo,   I would like to see a copy of the Lost Chord as well.   Thanks   Dan Wilkinson   STRAIGHT wrote:   > What do you have Carlo? I would like to see the organ arrangement, if it's > old enough to be out of copywrite. I have a real old one with the words. I > think it's for piano, but I just kind of rearranged it as I went along on > the organ. > Diane S. > (straight@infoblvd.net) > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture thread From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 19:09:08 +0100   List,   The gallery organ at All Saints has a nice mixture on the pedal, it does add that edge when playing fffffffffff, but with the 4' principal on the pedal it creates a lovely solo stop.   There are 2 mixtures on the Great although one of the doubles back too early so you get 16' when you don't want it. The choir has a sharp mixture - good for Bach stuff, and if you don't like someone you can shove their heads in the chair organ, pull it out and put all the notes down!!! The Swell has a fourniture which is very useful. That is about it.   The chancel organ has a pretty useless one on the Swell - it works with full organ, but when you have full swell apart from it and you need to crescendo, it is too big a leap even with the box closed. The Great has a Cornet (1 3/5, & 2 2/3) and another which I forget.   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Mixtures from the top From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 19:29:42 +0100   >Some modern builders build Pedal Reed Cornets based on the 32' harmonic >series (16 - [12 4/5] - 10 2/3 - 8 - 6 2/5 - 5 1/3 - 4, etc.) to try and >make a 32' resultant reed tone ... most of 'em you DON'T wanna hear, >mostly because the pitches are usually borrowed from elsewhere ... to >build an independent 32' Cornet of VII or more ranks would probably cost >as much as a half-length REAL 32' stop.     Interesting post :}   On the Compton organ at Derby Cathedral, the Pedal 32' Reed is made from mutations. Apparently Compton are one of the few who have got this right. This 'reed' does actually sound like a reed.   Richard    
(back) Subject: The Lost Chord From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 16:30:49 EDT   ........my copy of the Lost Chord is from "Everyone's Favorite Organ Pieces", edited by Harry Vibbard, published by Amasco Music, copyright MCMXXXVI (1936). If anyone wants a copy, please e-mail me privately.   Carlo   P.S. today (May 25th) is Diane Bish's birthday     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixtures from the top From: Bud/burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 14:11:01 -0700   Compton is known to us on this side of the pond as a builder who knows how to handle such things, and "judicious unification" as well ... isn't Temple Church's organ a big Compton unit organ?   Cheers,   Bud   Richard Pinel wrote:   > >Some modern builders build Pedal Reed Cornets based on the 32' harmonic > >series (16 - [12 4/5] - 10 2/3 - 8 - 6 2/5 - 5 1/3 - 4, etc.) to try and > >make a 32' resultant reed tone ... most of 'em you DON'T wanna hear, > >mostly because the pitches are usually borrowed from elsewhere ... to > >build an independent 32' Cornet of VII or more ranks would probably cost > >as much as a half-length REAL 32' stop. > > Interesting post :} > > On the Compton organ at Derby Cathedral, the Pedal 32' Reed is made from > mutations. Apparently Compton are one of the few who have got this right. > This 'reed' does actually sound like a reed. > > Richard > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Fw: Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 17:05:00 -0500   Progressive music?? ok. Wakeman and Richards were/are good musicians. The Royal Albert Hall instrument sounds great on that album --considering the listening clientele.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 9:52 AM Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Actual Facts - Text Edition     >On Tue, 25 May 1999, VEAGUE wrote: >> Adam... You shook the cobwebs in my dusty brain.... Clotho. I don't have >> the album, but heard it when it came out. Once again, very impressive and >> surprising coming from a rock band. > >http://www.cddb.com/ -- fantastic resource for finding recordings, titles, >album contents, etc. > >I wouldn't really call them a rock band. Rock is too broad a term. Along >with Yes and a few others, they were known as prog rock (progressive) or >orchestral rock. The keyboard talents of Rick Wakeman and Keith Emerson >are phenomenal. Both are classically trained pianists. > >-Adam > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: The Lost Chord From: Icorgan@aol.com Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 18:25:14 EDT   Jon, The Lost Chord begins with repeated notes. The Holy City rises a 4th before the repeated notes strike. Maybe you just have a mental block. I recommend you replace the 4th with a 5th applied liberally to the tonsils and surrounding membranes and you should be OK in the morning. Maynard  
(back) Subject: Re: ZymbelStern From: Icorgan@aol.com Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 18:25:23 EDT   Does one of us have our nautical terms mixed up? It seems the Great organ should have a ZymbelBOW, being in the front of the building, while the antiphonal should get the ZymbelSTERN in the back.  
(back) Subject: Fw: ZymbelStern From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 18:37:04 -0500   You're right... I checked Chapmans Piloting Seamanship and Small Boat Handling. You're relieved of galley duty tonight.   Rick V.   -----Original Message----- From: Icorgan@aol.com <Icorgan@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 5:35 PM Subject: Re: ZymbelStern     >Does one of us have our nautical terms mixed up? It seems the Great organ >should have a ZymbelBOW, being in the front of the building, while the >antiphonal should get the ZymbelSTERN in the back. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Mixtures from the top From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 19:57:30 EDT   In a message dated 5/25/99 5:20:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time, budchris@earthlink.net writes:   << isn't Temple Church's organ a big Compton unit organ? >>   Certainly, St. Bride's, Fleet Street is a remarkable example of the breed.   Those big derived pedal cornets as well as the Polyphones were used by Walter Holtkamp Senior. The one Polyphone I knew well, at St. Paul's, East Cleveland, never really worked terribly well - lots of hiss and not much pitch (another Spoonerism in the making!).   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com