PipeChat Digest #1140 - Monday, November 1, 1999
 
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Prelude Problem
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Noisy prelude - a solution
  by "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net>
Marie-Claire Alain in NYC (X post)
  by <WAYNE_BURCHAM@rsausa.com>
Re: performance anxiety
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
All Saints Poltergeists!
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "prswank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by <Sepp123@aol.com>
RE: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
RE: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
RE: Performance anxiety revisited
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Sunday October 31
  by "Irwin Franklin" <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 06:40:25 -0600   Tim Byram-Wigfield wrote: > > I read a definition of a voluntary once as music "you didn't have to = stay to > listen"!   And a fugue is a piece where the parts come in while the people go out...   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 06:59:07 -0600   So that's what all the noise is back there - apparently they're all bad aims, because they've missed me so far.   Glenda Sutton   P.S. Maybe if we all play the wedding march, we can get new organs too.   ----- Original Message ----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>   > the raucous hawkings and unnecessary coughing and spitting which are > made by the people." > > The passage siuggests that the WHOLE PURPOSE of having voluntaries in > church is to cover up the noise. Is your congregation spitting a lot? > If not, I would suggest you are unusually lucky <g>        
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 08:03:38 EST   In a message dated 11/01/1999 7:44:08 AM Eastern Standard Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << I read a definition of a voluntary once as music "you didn't have to = stay to > listen"! And a fugue is a piece where the parts come in while the people go out... >>     And a tocatta is a piece for an organ and a maniac.   Vicki  
(back) Subject: Prelude Problem From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 08:13:51 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0037_01BF2441.07E53800 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   You know, in reading all these posts, I realize that the problem comes =3D down to this: is the prelude part of the worship service or not? And for = =3D that matter, is the postlude?=3D20   If one says no, then it is perfectly acceptable to jabber during the =3D prelude and leave for the postlude. If the answer is yes, then it is not = =3D acceptable to do either.=3D20   Maybe it's a denominational thing?   -Rebekah   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0037_01BF2441.07E53800 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#d8d8d8> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>You know, in reading all these posts, I realize that = =3D the=3D20 problem comes down to this: is the prelude part of the worship service =3D or not?=3D20 And for that matter, is the postlude? </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>If one says no, then it is perfectly acceptable to = =3D jabber=3D20 during the prelude and leave for the postlude. If the answer is yes, =3D then it is=3D20 not acceptable to do either. </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Maybe it's a denominational thing?</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>-Rebekah</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0037_01BF2441.07E53800--    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude - a solution From: "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 07:33:51 -0600   I'm a big believer in "truth in advertising" during worship. All too = often we see things like "Amazing Grace" listed as a "Hymn of Praise" (etc., etc.). The prelude is the most maligned victim in this department. In my current church situation, the prelude is intended (and listed) as a time = of gathering for the church family. I have other opportunities to lead in worship from the organ. The congregation is thus expected to talk during the prelude. The problem comes when the prelude is listed as a time of reflection/preparation, or with the cliche "...use this time to ready your hearts and minds..." If this is the intended function of the prelude, = then make sure it happens! The easiest way is to remove its "signaling" function. Find some other way to signal the beginning of the service (chiming of hour, announcements, spoken welcome, etc.). Then, make the prelude an actual part of the service rather than a prefixed appendage. I have found that this works without exception.   For what it's worth....   Mark    
(back) Subject: Marie-Claire Alain in NYC (X post) From: WAYNE_BURCHAM@rsausa.com Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 08:28:48 -0500       Hi List,   M-CA, Fri., 10/29/99, 8 P.M., Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, East 88th = Street, NYC.   The program:   Prelude and Fugue in E-flat Major, BWV 552, J. S. Bach Three Chorale Preludes: Bach Wachet auf, BWV 645 Nun freut euch, lieben Cristen, BWV 734 Schmuecke dich, BWV 654 Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, BWV 543, Bach Intermission Presentation of AGO "Lifetime Achievement Award" to M-CA by Dr. John Obetz and Dr. Stephen Hamilton Fantaisie in A Major, C. Frank Scherzo in E Minor, A. Alain Postlude pour l'office de Complies, J. Alain Trois danses, J. Alain Joies Deuils Luttes Encore Noel, C. Balbastre   The organ: Rieger, 1987   Grand Orgue (unenclosed) 16' Bourdon 8' Montre 8' Flute 4' Prestant 2' Doublette VII Grosse Fourniture 1 1/3' V Fourniture 1' V Cymbale 8" Cromorne 8' Trompette 4' Clairon   Positif (unenclosed) 8' Flute 4' Principal (facade) 1 1/3' Larigot 1' IV Mixture 8' V Cornet 8' Trompette 8' Chamade   Recit (enclosed) 8' Flute 8' Salicional 8' Celeste 4' Flute 1' Sifflet 16' Basson 8' Hautbois 8' Trompette harmonique 4' Clairon harmonique Tremolo   Pedale (Grand Ravalement) 16' Montre 16' Bourdon 8' Principal 32' Kontrabombarde 16' Bombarde 8' Trompette     Wayne NYC & Milford, PA      
(back) Subject: Re: performance anxiety From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 08:50:31 -0500 (EST)   Well, I did forget to remove the pew cushions for the recital yesterday, but, no matter.....   most were covered with people!!!! We had a great turn-out of around 100 people (not bad considering there were three other concerts and an organ dedication --the Westminster Presby Johnson-- in town at about the same time). We also raised around $250 for the Florida United Methodist Children's Home. Usually our offerings at recitals go into the music instrumental portion of the budget, but we were informed, this being Children's Home Sunday (all fifth Sundays), that the FUMCHS is having extreme financial problems to the point that there have been employee lay-offs and cottage closings with more to come at the first of the year. (So if any of you rich folks need a tax write-off..... ;-) !!!). Also, I must thank the kind person who passed along the wonderful tidbit about bananas. IT WORKS IT WORKS IT WORKS!!!! I was so relaxed but still felt the slight performance tension which is necessary (and mental), but my body was not fighting me or itself. I highly recommend bananas... whoopeeee oooga oooga (but not too many -- two is the limit!).   The audience really liked the Boellman and Gigout Toccatas, the Bolcom "Graceful Ghost", and Joplin "Chrysanthemums". Of course, they liked the T&F in d-m, but I think they really enjoyed the "new" pieces added to the repertoir. The Gainesville Brass Quintet did a splendid job, and it was fun to watch the concert crowd swaying to the music.   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: All Saints Poltergeists! From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 09:07:55 -0500 (EST)   Did anyone else have Poltergeists in church??   Although preoctave (which might have been the problem!), we seemed to have had a few "frisky spirits" in church Sunday.   We have a very beautiful All Saints ribbon banner which is a banner frame with about fifty or sixty coloured ribbons hanging down. On each ribbon are velcro squares to which bells are attached by parishoners wanting to honor deceased loved ones. The banner is carried in silent procession as the names of those deceased in the past year are read. The only sound, other than the reader, is the gentle tinkling of the bells. It is quite moving.   However!!!.... during the service the occasional bell would fall from the banner rendering a psychodeafening "tink-thump" as it hit the carpet.   Also, while the bells were playing one of the bells rolled off the table to the floor (oops, no carpet in the choir loft!).   During the third stanza of the middle hymn, as we sang "Round each habitation hovering, see the cloud and fire appear...." blink! out went the music rack light on the organ!! The choir noticed immediately since my "aura" was suddenly GONE! My heart stopped momentarily as my brain forgot that the light was not on switched power, and I listened very carefully to be sure the pitch wasn't sagging on the organ (whew! it was still "on").   And this on the day of a recital! Fortunately (or not!), our "blue laws" only cover alcolohic beverages (until 2 -- don't ask my why drinking is no longer a sin after two o'clock--dah!), and I was able to get a replacement fluorescent tube on the way home. But, and I don't know how organ builders select places to put "quality construction", but replacing the music rack light requires removal of NINE screws! Yeesh! Like the prepared 32' ContraBombarde is going to rattle the music rack! ;-)   Unfortunately, after the recital we went to dinner and got home too late for the trick-or-treaters. Now I have all this candy to eat MYSELF.... BWWAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Not only that! It's chocolate, so I can't share it with the beagles.. BWWAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Whoooooopeeeeeeeee!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: prswank <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 09:23:01 -0500   I have had the same problem with noisy time at the beginning of the = service in the various churches where I have played. My solution was, with the agreement of the pastor, to have a ten minute = time (marked in the bulletin) of Gathering Music beginning fifteen minutes = before the service. Then a very short silence, followed by the Prelude. Both pieces = of music were listed in the bulletin as part of the regular service order. = This gave the congregation time to say hello to each other, which was often the = only time they saw each other, but also provided the "mood-switching" which = many preferred before the service. Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (Retired) Christ Lutheran Church-LCMS Dundalk, MD.   Charles E. Peery wrote:   > Hey, gang, > > I'm subbing pretty much for a well-to-do Methodist church which is = without > an organist. Having heard five people audition (I was not one of them), > they offered it to their top choice, who declined. Now they're after me = to > take it. > > One thing that bugs me, though, is that during the prelude the people in = the > congregation are SO LOUD, I can hardly concentrate. This morning a man > across the nave from me and about six rows back leaned forward to say > something to a lady three rows in front of him, and his voice was so = loud > that I heard every word and jumped. I swear I thought he was yelling at = me. > Worse yet, I was so rattled I played Webern instead of Rheinberger for > about a measure. I guess it'll be good for me to learn not to lose = focus, > but... > > Yeah, there's a notice in the bulletin that the "Prelude is an = invitation to > silent mediation and preparation for worship", but it sounds more like a > convention mixer out there... and maybe it's just the peculiar acoustics = of > this sanctuary, but I can REALLY HEAR EVERYTHING. > > Anything that any of you have done to modify behavior in a case like = this? > I mean, I can always just play louder or choose more aggressive = preludes. > > Chuck Peery > Cincinnati > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 09:46:20 -0500 (EST)   Well, Chuck (and I'm assuming your a young Chuck!).... Welcome to the wacky (and noisy) world of church music. The preservice time is now a social time for people to be friendly (which requires noise or it's not valid!) so that people don't think Christians are stuffy and rude, focusing their attention away from other people to prepare to worship God. God would HATE being the center of attention "they" tell us.   >I'm subbing pretty much for a well-to-do > Methodist church which is without an organist. Two lessons to learn here: Methodists are by nature noisy and, more importantly, money does not buy class or good breeding!! ;-) The noisiest and most rude weddings I play for are the high society ones. Also notice that the only TV shows with really good cat fights and brawls are the ones about rich people: Dallas, Young and the Restless, and the one about the "Carringtons" (dah! senior moment!!), and of course sKnots Landing!   >Having heard five people audition (I was not > one of them), they offered it to their top > choice, who declined. Ah! What fun! I had an extremely rich friend who was a fantastic player and just got the greatest kick out of auditioning for church jobs, stringing them along, getting a great salary package/contract and then declining the job!   >Now they're after me to take it. If the salary and organ are good take it and use it for a learning experience. Another job will be along later if you're not satisfied.   >This morning a man across the nave from me > and about six rows back leaned forward to > say something to a lady three rows in front of > him, and his voice was so loud that I heard > every word and jumped. I swear I thought he > was yelling at me. You missed your cue! That's when you should stop playing, look very embarrassed and say (loudly) "Oh, I thought you were talking to me!" I remember an organist who got tired of the preacher always coming up and talking to her during the prelude. She cured him by abruptly lifting her hands from the keys, politely answering his question, and then continuing the prelude from where she'd left off. He finally got the message (although it did take a while for him to catch on!).   >=A0=A0Worse yet, I was so rattled I played Webern > instead of Rheinberger for about a measure. I > guess it'll be good for me to learn not to lose > focus, but... On the up-side. NO ONE NOTICED! because no one was listening!! I recall one Sunday in a very noisy Presbyterian church in which the console sits on the nave level with the "bidnez" side of the console to the congregation, entering to play the prelude and noticing the noise level in the congregation I dediced to do an "experiment". I sat down at the console, put my music on the music rack, drew the appropriate stops and began playing the prelude. At 11 sharp, the minister stepped through the west door and announced the hymn. I very discreetly reached over and turned the organ ON, and began playing the introduction to the first hymn. The only give-away to my experiment was the burst of laughter from the lady sitting on the first pew behind the console. Somehow word got around and the next week it was much quieter when I sat down.   >Yeah, there's a notice in the bulletin that the > "Prelude is an invitation to silent mediation > and preparation for worship"... might I suggest the "Texas version" of appropriate Scripture: "The Lord is in His Holy Temple, Let all the earth SHUT-UP!"   > and maybe it's just the peculiar acoustics of > this sanctuary, but I can REALLY HEAR > EVERYTHING. Well, don't complain. They'll just put down more carpet!! The down-side of good acoustics....   >Anything that any of you have done to modify > behavior in a case like this? Unfortunately, louder or more aggressive preludes usually results in louder and more aggressive talking (sigh). I have found that the best way to get quiet is to have the choir sing before the prelude to "confuse" people into thinking the service has started. This can be done if you are playing (and I'm not advocating this -- hehe) a chorale prelude; the choir can also sing verses of a psalm to simple chant interspersed among improvisations or short pieces. Also, stanzas of a hymn can be interspersed among "nonrelated" selections such as the wonderful Nielsen 29 Preludes. These pieces, by the way, are very short and can be mixed and matched by key or texture into very nice little pieces, although it sometimes does necessitate a bit of transposition (which is good exercise, too).   Good luck, Chuck. Keep us posted on your progress (or the name of the "facility" where you eventually reside!! hehehehe)   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 09:51:15 -0500 (EST)     >While not condoning the raucous behavior in > the nave, I'd say use the "opportunity" to hone > your skills at tuning out extranious noise while > performing. I had a friend at the University of Houston who used to practice his memory work with a tape recording of the stock market exchange going. He said it helped learn to tune out extraneous noise and was almost as loud as his church job.   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 10:06:52 -0500 (EST)     >Or just stop and wait for them to shut up. That > can be more telling than trying to drown out > the din! When I was in college the organist at the church was the college organist. His method of "training" the congregation was to establish an imaginary "noise limit". Whenever the congregation reached the mark, he would just lift his hands from from the keyboard and hold his position until the level reduced below the "mark". After several abrupt stops over several weeks, things quieted down. Of course, people aren't as tolerant and respectful of musical temperament as they use to be!!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 10:11:11 -0500 (EST)   > I haven't talked to my mother since May....   bad girl! bad girl!   CALL YOUR MOTHER!!!!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: Sepp123@aol.com Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 10:30:24 EST   I'm enjoying this thread. I especially liked Bruce C.'s story about playing an entire prelude with no sound. Maybe I'll try that sometime... Switched Off Bach, perhaps.   Here's something I sent to piporg-l a while back. The church is of Presbyterian persuasion.   -----   The prelude-as-integral-part-of-the-service concept is highly commendable. But as long as I have to fend for myself "before" the service I'll gravitate towards the BUILDUP TO LOUD CLIMAX/GRAND PAUSE/THEN PIANISSIMO kind of piece. At my church there's nothing like a good crescendo followed by total silence to bring down the ... uh ... ambient noise level. Sometimes the chatter subsides only momentarily, but more often I feel = like I have the parishioners in the palm of my hand, and as the music proceeds quietly they remember where they are. The Grand Pause is the key; many pieces build to full organ, but they come back down too gradually to achieve the desired behavioral results. A similar effect can be achieved by programming "contrasting" pieces for the prelude, such as "Fanfare in ___ " followed by "Meditation on _______". Somebody should publish a collection of pieces just for this purpose. It could be called "Subito Piano: Crowd Control Resources for the Organist". If I were the editor on such a project I would include some of Gerre Hancock's music, such as his "Air" and "Prelude on Nettleton". Any other suggestions?   Joe McConathy Fort Collins, CO    
(back) Subject: RE: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 11:26:49 -0500 (EST)     >A few weeks of silence should do the trick! >Bud's approach is probably the most > diplomatic.. .....until you discover that the "great unwashed" prefer not to have "background" music while they talk!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: RE: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 11:31:57 -0500 (EST)     >During both the televised funeral of Cardinal > Hume from Westminster Cathedral, and also > the Royal Wedding, the commentators > insisted on talking when there was any music > (sung or played; realy important details such > as the colour of the hats etc! And, of course, we have the example of perfect decorum from the Vatican's Midnight Mass broadcast, with the commentator/MC narrating as though watching a horserace: The Pope is moving toward the high altar; the acolytes moving diagonally approaching from the left with torches; the thurifer is heading off the Cardinal and moving toward the tabernacle. Sort of makes one want to dial 1-800-RACEV-2 and place a bet...   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: RE: Performance anxiety revisited From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 11:33:59 -0500 (EST)     >"Rhosymedre" I understand means "Beautiful > place" in Welsh. Unfortunately...the town is > full of slagheaps and bus stations! Well, it's all relative. Maybe if you're in a downtown parish.....   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 11:45:28 -0500 (EST)   =A0 >And for that matter,,,no one ever leaves the > sanctuary before the postlude is over,,albeit it >is NOT a 15 minute extravaganza to show the > organ OR the organist off! Do I sense some hostility toward those who will offer a Franck Chorale, or other major work, as a postlude with the intent that some will choose to remain and be further edified by the message of the music carried on the sound of the organ??   > I realize that I am rapidly becoming a > "dinosaur" but for the large part--in my world, > its about worship... > I have never thought of accompanying > congregational singing as anything but an > adjunct to worship, certainly not > showmanship. Simply because someone's playing is artistic and creative does not necessarily mean they are showing off. Otherwise the entire service should be played on the most bland of stops. Of course, the organ should not dominate or distract, just as the preacher's oratory should be dramatic and clear without being pompous or overly dramatic. Good taste and a prayerful approach should always govern. But please do not devalue the role of the organ in the music of worship!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Sunday October 31 From: Irwin Franklin <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 09:16:58 -0800 (PST)   Though the discussion on whether to play the Bach T and F in d seems to be over, I must report that at All Saints Episcopal in Tupelo, MS, our Priest preached an incredible sermon on halloween and put it in great perspective as it relates to the church. I had arranged for the choir director to help me as the final benediction was pronounced. She put the cape on as I put the Phantom mask and hat on and as soon as the final Amen was said I launched into Bach. When I finished there was applause and I looked up to find that not one person had left the church. There were children surrounding the console and I couldn't have been happier.   Anybody else have a good experience to tell?   Tom Ed Moore All Saints Church Tupelo, MS University Organist University of North Alabama     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 12:14:37 -0500 (EST)       >Somebody should publish a collection of > pieces just for this purpose. It could be called > "Subito Piano: Crowd Control Resources for > the Organist". If I were the editor on such a >project I would include some of Gerre > Hancock's music, such as his "Air" and > "Prelude on Nettleton". Any other > suggestions? "Surprise Prelude" by Franz Swellshoebert   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 10:21:07   At 09:46 AM 11/1/1999 -0500, you wrote: >Also notice that the only TV shows with really good cat fights and brawls are the >ones about rich people: Dallas, Young and the Restless, and the one about the >"Carringtons" (dah! senior moment!!)<snip>   DIE-NASTY!! How COULD you forget????   hehehehe!   DeserTBoB