PipeChat Digest #1141 - Monday, November 1, 1999
 
Re: Sunday October 31
  by "prswank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
RE: PipeChat Digest #1136 - 10/30/99
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Easy Christmas Ski
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Publishing Paradigms (X-Posted)
  by "Russell Greene" <russg@cyberspc.mb.ca>
more music need
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Noisy Sermons
  by "Higgins, Floyd (GSP)" <HigginsF@gspinc.com>
RE: PipeChat Digest #1137 - 10/31/99
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Error
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
All Hallows'
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Bananas and potassium
  by "Shirley" <pnst@snip.net>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by <LeliaLoban@aol.com>
Re: Noisy Sermons
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Noisy Sermons
  by <SProt82850@cs.com>
Re: Bananas and potassium
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: All Hallows'
  by "Irwin Franklin" <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com>
Re: more music need
  by "prswank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Bennett Organs (Longish)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
Re: more music need
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: more music need
  by "prswank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Re: more music need
  by "prswank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Bananas and potassium
  by "Ian McLean" <SoloTibia@bigpond.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Sunday October 31 From: prswank <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 13:20:10 -0500   I subbed Sunday morning at an ELCA Lutheran church which had a Saturday Halloween festivity at the church put on by the Sunday School. Well...one Sunday School teacher got her dates mixed up and showed up for the Reformation service (with the bishop presiding) in a COW suit, complete with a large udder on the front. She did not go home to change but stayed for the service. It was all that I could do to continue when one member of the choir said, Holy Cow!" as he passed me. That did it. The pastor saved the day. I mean, what was he going to do? During the preliminaries (announcements, etc before the service), he welcomed the visitors personally, and told the story of the cow suit. Otherwise the congregation would have been at loose ends. I didn't see whether she came to receive communion from the bishop. I'll have to ask.   Holy Cow,   Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (Retired) Christ Lutheran Church-LCMS Dundalk, MD   Irwin Franklin wrote:   > Though the discussion on whether to play the Bach T > and F in d seems to be over, I must report that at All > Saints Episcopal in Tupelo, MS, our Priest preached an > incredible sermon on halloween and put it in great > perspective as it relates to the church. I had > arranged for the choir director to help me as the > final benediction was pronounced. She put the cape on > as I put the Phantom mask and hat on and as soon as > the final Amen was said I launched into Bach. When I > finished there was applause and I looked up to find > that not one person had left the church. There were > children surrounding the console and I couldn't have > been happier. > > Anybody else have a good experience to tell? > > Tom Ed Moore > All Saints Church > Tupelo, MS > University Organist > University of North Alabama > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: RE: PipeChat Digest #1136 - 10/30/99 From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 13:51:45 -0500   A tendency? Dear, wake up. But in the 1970s supposedly, and I read the results, there had been some sort of scientific study with musicians which in the end the results showed that keyboardists in general tended to = attract gay males whereas stringed instruments were definitely heterosexually attracting among males. I do not know if there were studies regarding = women in this matter (or females, if you prefer) and I must say I found it odd that even more attractive to heterosexual men were, well, wind instruments that one blows air into with one's mouth (as opposed to the organ).     > Are you suggesting there's a tendency...?! > > TBW >  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Christmas Ski From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 15:03:43 -0500   >My DRE has asked her if I knew of any kind of childrens skit or >presentation that >that could be done before Family Mass on Christmas Eve-- Maybe 15 >minutes in length. This is not an area of expertise for me. Does >anyone have anything easy to suggest that incorporates Christmas Carols >or some other easy kind of music. The people working primarily with the >children are volunteers . Any help would surely be appreciated.     Did you find anything yet?   We used a one of the story of "Silent Night" some years back. Really cute and mostly kids.   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: Publishing Paradigms (X-Posted) From: Russell Greene <russg@cyberspc.mb.ca> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 13:27:55 -0600   on 10/30/99 2:09 AM, Noel Stoutenburg at mjolnir@ticnet.com wrote:   > A new thread here: > > Up until now, organ music has been produced in "hardcopy", where the > scores are printed up in advance, and we make our selections from a > catalog, or from a display of printed material. > > 1) Would you buy a CD-ROM containing a(n approximate) rendering of the > music, in addition to an image of the page, thereby having the > opportunity of listening to the CD, perhaps being able to view the > score as the music is played, to purchase the priviledge of printing out > only the songs you want on our own printer?   Yes, absolutely. Would much prefer a MIDI file rather than a rendering of the music, but that is perhaps just me. > > 1 a) In comparison to the cost of the same quantity of "conventional > music", how much would you pay for music you obtain in this method: the > same amount? half as much?   Substantially less seeing that the publisher's costs would be much lower, particularly if we are talking choral music where multiple copies would be required. It will be interesting to see how that can be controlled. > > 2) Years ago, and I think, even today in the case of some "Library > quality" collected works editions, a common means of publishing music > was by subscription. Based upon an announcement of future availability, > one could decide whether or not to buy a copy of a particular work / > volume. Would you consider buying a subscription to music by some > composer?   Yes, that would be beneficial to me. > > 2 a) Would you consider buying a music CD-ROM (as above) on a > subscription basis?   Yes I would. Publishers might want to look at the idea of publishing a number of works on a CD-ROM, with an internet payment to unlock printing capability for each work. Adobe Type On Call uses a scheme such as this to sell their Postscript Fonts. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: more music need From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 15:50:01 -0500   Dear list,   Thanks so much again for the pointers to the "Twelve Days after = Christmas."   Now I need another - been totally batting zero on this one:   It's a German Carol - traditional I think called:   "Leise rieselt der schnee"   Has anyone seen that available anywhere? We're using flute and organ.   Is: "Gently Rustles the Snow" a fair translation?   Thanks in advance,   John V              
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy Sermons From: "Higgins, Floyd (GSP)" <HigginsF@gspinc.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 14:56:06 -0500   I think I would prefer people noisily ignoring my playing than silently ignoring it. Preachers must feel the same when it is clear people just aren't keyed in.   I heard this story a long time ago. An organist is playing the 11:00 service. At 10:40, the sermon begins. At noon, the preacher is still = going strong. The tower clock begins to strike the hour. The organist, knowing that the tower chimes are connected to the organ console and, for that matter, which note strikes the hour, mischievously pulls the "tower = chimes" knob.   Eight...Nine...Ten...Eleven...Twelve...Thirteen.   At this point, a great stir breaks out in the congregation...     Sometimes the game is lost from the opening line. I heard this happen myself: the Catholic priest steps up to the microphone after the opening hymn to proclaim "The Lord is With You." However, the congregation is silent as the priest realizes the mic was off. He clicks on the mic and says "Sorry, the mic wasn't on", to which is answered, "And Also with = You."   higginsf@gspinc.com  
(back) Subject: RE: PipeChat Digest #1137 - 10/31/99 From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 15:10:21 -0500   Shouldn't this carry a warning "May induce nausea and vomiting."   >One non-medical cure for this is to imagine everyone in the audiance = NAKED. Picturing this in your mind of each person should start you giggling. >  
(back) Subject: Error From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 15:11:21 -0500   Error on the Gillian Weir organ concert at Holy Cross Chapel, Worcester on Sunday Nov. 7. The time is 3pm not 4pm, sorry. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: All Hallows' From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 13:15:20   OK, 'fess up...who did LeMare's transcription of "Danse Macabre" yesterday for a postlude? I KNOW you're out there....   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 15:30:55 -0500 (EST)     >...and the one about the "Carringtons" (dah! =A0 > senior moment!!)<snip> >DIE-NASTY!! How COULD you forget???? Dearie me! How the old neurons misfire these days!! ;-)   Actually, I only saw the first episode and I thought I saw a "Hairless Phunne Mochine" in the den, and I couldn't bear to take the chance that maybe they'd play it. (hurl) BWAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Bananas and potassium From: Shirley <pnst@snip.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 16:15:50 -0500   Well, so there ya have it. Bruce has pronounced bananas the cure for performance anxiety.... at least in his case.   So, you brilliant folks who first suggested it, how much potassium is in two bananas?   TIA.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: LeliaLoban@aol.com Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 15:58:22 EST     "Roc" wrote, > I realize that I am rapidly becoming a "dinosaur" but for the large part--in my world, its about worship... I have never thought of = accompanying congregational singing as anything but an adjunct to worship, certainly = not showmanship. >   Bruce Cornely wrote, >>Simply because someone's playing is artistic and creative does not necessarily mean they are showing off. Otherwise the entire service = should be played on the most bland of stops. Of course, the organ should not dominate or distract, just as the preacher's oratory should be dramatic = and clear without being pompous or overly dramatic. Good taste and a prayerful =   approach should always govern. But please do not devalue the role of the =   organ in the music of worship!>>   Here is a brief excerpt from the lengthy report of the Consistory of = Arnstadt regarding numerous complaints against J. S. Bach in 1607:   "[The Consistory] charge[s] him with having hitherto been in the habit of making surprising _variations_ in the chorales, and intermixing divers strange sounds, so that thereby the congregation were confounded. If in = the future he wishes to introduce some _tonus Peregrinus_ he must keep to it, = and not go off directly to something else, or, as he had hitherto done, play quite a _tonum contrarium_. " (Quoted in Phillipp Spitta, translated by Clara Bell and J. A. Fuller-Maitland, _Johann Sebastian Bach_, Vol. 1, = Dover, 1951, p. 315 ff. Italics in the original.)   The same report also notes that the choir-master, Andreas Rambach, = complained that, "The Organist, Bach, used to play too long preludes, but after this = was notified to him, by the Herr Superintendent, he went at once to quite the opposite extreme and has made them too short."   In fairness, however, this is also the report in which the Consistory = accuses Bach of neglecting the education of his students and abusing his leave of absence, granted for four weeks to go visit Dietrich Buxtehude. That = last, at least, is a verifiably valid complaint, since Bach had taken off for = four *months*! The report also points out that the choir-master, Rambach, was hardly fit to cast stones: "We reproach him with having gone to a = wine-shop last Sunday during the sermon," among other things. The Consistory = punished tattler and tippler Rambach by sending him to the slammer for two hours a = day for four days, while giving Bach eight days to respond to the report. He ignored it. This was not the first or the last time someone criticized = him for playing too much of that wild stuff in church.   The more things change the more they stay the same....   Lelia  
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy Sermons From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 15:50:01 -0500 (EST)     >I think I would prefer people noisily ignoring > my playing than silently ignoring it. Sorry. This is beyond me. If they silently ignored the music at least I could enjoy playing it!   >I heard this story a long time ago. An organist > is playing the 11:00 service. At 11:40, the > sermon begins. At noon, the preacher is still > going strong. The tower clock begins to strike > the hour. The organist, knowing that the tower > chimes are connected to the organ console > and, for that matter, which note strikes the > hour, mischievously pulls the "tower chimes" > knob. >Eight...Nine...Ten...Eleven...Twelve...Thirteen. >At this point, a great stir breaks out in the >congregation... Wow! Gotta remember that one.   The closest I ever came to that was when I played an Alien-600 series with "coffee pot" chiff operated from its own tab. It was great fun on rainy days to "end" the sermon by distracting the minister with "drip, drip, drip, drip.... "   The minister at the Methodist church where I worshipped as a child told the congregation that when he started at that church he told the ushers he liked to preach until 11:50. If, by that time he had not finished, he asked one of them to hold up a wrist watch as a signal. One day he preached until 12:10 and look up to see the usher (with a big smile) standing at the entrance holding a large wall calendar!!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy Sermons From: SProt82850@cs.com Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 17:09:37 EST   I witnessed the following story regarding priests and microphones:   The priest says "Peace be with you" and realizes the microphone is fading = in and out. In the next moment he says "There's something wrong with this microphone" which is heard throughout the church since the mike chooses to =   work at that moment. The congregation immediately replies "And also with you!"   And who says church (even Episcopal) has to be dull?   Steven  
(back) Subject: Re: Bananas and potassium From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 15:09:51   At 04:15 PM 11/1/1999 -0500, you wrote: >Well, so there ya have it. Bruce has pronounced bananas the cure for >performance anxiety.... at least in his case.<snip>   This is no joke! I've been under treatment for panic/anxiety disorder for awhile now, and found that bananas (or elevated potassium levels) work wonders!   DeserTBoB > >So, you brilliant folks who first suggested it, how much potassium is in >two bananas? > >TIA. > > --Shirley > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: All Hallows' From: Irwin Franklin <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 14:40:31 -0800 (PST)   If I'd had it I would have done it.     --- Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> wrote: > OK, 'fess up...who did LeMare's transcription of > "Danse Macabre" yesterday > for a postlude? I KNOW you're out there.... > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: more music need From: prswank <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 17:52:45 -0500   John V.: The translation of the german is, "Snow falls soft in the night" at this = german site: <http://ingel.org/Lieder/LieseRie.htmnl> This site contains many german folk songs in german and english, as well = as a midi rendtion of them. It's a great site, with a lot of good links = especially for the midi-minded. Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (retired) Christ Lutheran Church-LCMS Dundalk, MD   John Vanderlee wrote:   > Dear list, > > Thanks so much again for the pointers to the "Twelve Days after = Christmas." > > Now I need another - been totally batting zero on this one: > > It's a German Carol - traditional I think called: > > "Leise rieselt der schnee" > > Has anyone seen that available anywhere? We're using flute and organ. > > Is: "Gently Rustles the Snow" a fair translation? > > Thanks in advance, > > John V > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Bennett Organs (Longish) From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 17:11:31 -0600   On Thu, 28 Oct 1999 22:20:43 -0500 Brent Johnson <bmjohns@fgi.net> wrote to the list:   > Today I got to find something nice. A 99% functional > tubular-pneumatic > organ > with the name Bennett on it. This organ was in the Presbyterian > church of > Bridgeport, Illinois. The Bennett organ company seems to be of > Rock Island, > Illinois, according to the nameplate.   Dear Brent, Bill (van Pelt) and Lists:   Back in 1983, our company was responsible for the removal of what must have been Bennett's largest and a very late example of their organbuilding. This was in the Masonic Temple in Decatur, IL. It was from 1928 or 9, from what I've been told, as the building dates from 1927.   Unfortunately, it had suffered injustice at a local organ itinerant named John Krastina (now deceased), who used this instrument as his "Midnight Organ Supply" when talking care of other instruments. He had been entrusted with the task of bringing the organ back to optimum state, and probably did succeed at keeping it playable longer than would have been otherwise the case without his ministrations.   However, the fatal blow was when a steam main for building's heating system froze and ruptured and poured thousands of gallons of steam and hot water all over the Great and Choir Divisions of the instrument.   The organ was examined by Yours Truly, as well as a "second opinion" rendered by the Temple's Insurance company's builder, David Cogswell (also Deceased) from the former Berkshire Organ Company in MA.   The long and short of it was: a sizable settlement, which would have been enough to completely restore the instrument was received by the Temple Association, which unwisely decided instead to air-condition their building, sell the pipe organ and install a cheap substitute.   During our removal of the instrument, it struck us that the instrument was built using a rather ingenious system of mass-production organbuilding that Bennett Pioneered (the so-called "Bennett System"). This consisted of the use of individual chests with the channeling in the Bottom Boards, which were fed by a common "Plenum" at either end of the chest, and were "ganged" together by the use of Union Boards between the individual sections. A "Master Primary" unit was employed in front of the first chest, and then as many chest sections as there were stops were assembled; the only custom assemblies being the Plenums. The unused holes on the end of the last chest were capped off with a blank Union Board.   These particular chests were very much similar to the OSI Chests with the action in the Bottom Board, which meant the Pouch Board removed with the Bottom Board. Service was easy, in that all that needed to be done to remove a section was take off the screws to the two Union Boards on either side of the chest, remove the Bottom Board Screws and drop out the entire Action. The Stop Action was Pitman. They also built Unit Chests using this similar modular approach. The chest sections measured 8" X 8" X 90" long and many held 73 pipes.   The console for this particular instrument was unique, in that the interior very much appeared like a Theater Organ, while the exterior, for this use, was a Greek Revival dark mahogany finish.   I've cleaned-up and re-used several of these chests and they all have worked quite well.   I'm sure the instrument would still be working quite well, except for the short-sightedness of the Masonic Temple authorities, as well as the mishap with the steam main.   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders 41-43 Johnston St. P. O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX arpncorn@davesworld.net Business EMAIL rnjs@family-net.net Personal EMAIL  
(back) Subject: Re: more music need From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 18:16:03 -0500   > The translation of the german is, "Snow falls soft in the night" at this german > site: > <http://ingel.org/Lieder/LieseRie.htmnl> > This site contains many german folk songs in german and english, as well as a > midi rendtion of them. It's a great site, with a lot of good links especially > for the midi-minded.   Paul, I tried this link and it went :P. Mayhaps it is simply my browser. Could you check that and/or send it again?   Thanks! :) -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Re: more music need From: prswank <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 18:34:54 -0500   Sorry gang, The correct site is <http://ingeb.org/Lieder/LieseRie.html>   It's amazing what a difference one little letter makes. Paul (Still retired)   prswank wrote:   > John V.: > The translation of the german is, "Snow falls soft in the night" at this = german > site: > <http://ingel.org/Lieder/LieseRie.htmnl> > This site contains many german folk songs in german and english, as well = as a > midi rendtion of them. It's a great site, with a lot of good links = especially > for the midi-minded. > Paul R. Swank > Organist/Choirmaster (retired) > Christ Lutheran Church-LCMS > Dundalk, MD > > John Vanderlee wrote: > > > Dear list, > > > > Thanks so much again for the pointers to the "Twelve Days after = Christmas." > > > > Now I need another - been totally batting zero on this one: > > > > It's a German Carol - traditional I think called: > > > > "Leise rieselt der schnee" > > > > Has anyone seen that available anywhere? We're using flute and organ. > > > > Is: "Gently Rustles the Snow" a fair translation? > > > > Thanks in advance, > > > > John V > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: more music need From: prswank <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1999 19:07:05 -0500   It seems that I must have been using an old link that only works for me. Try this <http://ingeb.org/VolksonL.html> On this page scroll down to the song, then click on it for the words and = melody. Try again. Paul (Getting tired in retirement)   prswank wrote:   > Sorry gang, > The correct site is <http://ingeb.org/Lieder/LieseRie.html> > > It's amazing what a difference one little letter makes. > Paul (Still retired) > > prswank wrote: > > > John V.: > > The translation of the german is, "Snow falls soft in the night" at = this german > > site: > > <http://ingel.org/Lieder/LieseRie.htmnl> > > This site contains many german folk songs in german and english, as = well as a > > midi rendtion of them. It's a great site, with a lot of good links = especially > > for the midi-minded. > > Paul R. Swank > > Organist/Choirmaster (retired) > > Christ Lutheran Church-LCMS > > Dundalk, MD > > > > John Vanderlee wrote: > > > > > Dear list, > > > > > > Thanks so much again for the pointers to the "Twelve Days after = Christmas." > > > > > > Now I need another - been totally batting zero on this one: > > > > > > It's a German Carol - traditional I think called: > > > > > > "Leise rieselt der schnee" > > > > > > Has anyone seen that available anywhere? We're using flute and = organ. > > > > > > Is: "Gently Rustles the Snow" a fair translation? > > > > > > Thanks in advance, > > > > > > John V > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related = topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Bananas and potassium From: Ian McLean <SoloTibia@bigpond.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 10:48:12 +1000   Shirley wrote:   > Well, so there ya have it. Bruce has pronounced bananas the cure for > performance anxiety.... at least in his case.   And, my mother has also found them useful in elevating her Potassium = levels. However, in my search for natural anxiety management solutions I came upon this quote;   "A wide spread fallacy is that bananas are a rich source of potassium. As you can clearly see from the table, they are only a moderate source, about the same as potatoes. I have a feeling this is a classic case of the success plants have had in fooling the primates or possibly the success of advertising campaigns."   The site is;   http://members.tripod.com/~charles_W/arthritis9.html   Well worth a look for some pretty well researched and cross referenced information.   > So, you brilliant folks who first suggested it, how much potassium is in > two bananas?   I think that the site above actually has the metrics for this.   I find that elevated Potassium for me, as it seems for others here, works wonders.   Ian McLean