PipeChat Digest #1143 - Wednesday, November 3, 1999
 
Advent/Christmas Anthems
  by "tgregory@speeddial.net" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Sunday October 31
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Schulmerich Organ Chimes
  by "prswank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Advent/Christmas Anthems
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
RE: Advent/Christmas Anthems
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
Re: An organ CD for those who are thinking of transcriptions
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
A Useless Piece of Information (Was: London)
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Tips to deal with performance anxiety
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Transcription Performers
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Transcription Performers
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Plainsong - psalms
  by "Paul Austin" <paul.p.austin@talk21.com>
Rhosymedre - text
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
a few more Page clues??
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Complete JSB
  by "Robert Horton" <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU>
Re: Rhosymedre - text
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Complete JSB
  by "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Rhosymedre - text
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: Complete JSB
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 


(back) Subject: Advent/Christmas Anthems From: tgregory@speeddial.net <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 99 06:44:35 -0500   Greetings:   I have found that many of my choir members will be traveling during the Advent/Christmas season.   Does anyone have suggestions for two part (mixed voices) anthems?   Thanks,     Tom Gregory  
(back) Subject: Re: Sunday October 31 From: Alan Freed <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 08:34:00 -0500   Tom, that's terrific! Thanks for the report!   > From: Irwin Franklin <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com> > > Anybody else have a good experience to tell? >   Alan, who thinks fun and church go together    
(back) Subject: Schulmerich Organ Chimes From: prswank <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 09:25:00 -0500   Hi gang, I have a set of 6 feet tall Schulmerich Organ Chimes on eBay now, with a dark wood floor stand. Everything is working fine. It has a small under-manual keyboard, but can be modified with parts available from Organ Supply Industries to work from the key contacts or a set of separate under-key contacts. The chimes can also be removed from the floor stand and hung on L-shaped brackets on the wall. The chimes are located in Baltimore, Maryland and must be picked up. The reserve price is $250.00.   Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (Retired) Christ Lutheran Church-LCMS Dundalk, MD.    
(back) Subject: Re: Advent/Christmas Anthems From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 10:00:14 -0800   Look in the Morning Star Choir Book series (3 vols) from Concordia.   Cheers,   Bud -----Original Message----- From: tgregory@speeddial.net <tgregory@speeddial.net> To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, November 02, 1999 3:41 AM Subject: Advent/Christmas Anthems     >Greetings: > >I have found that many of my choir members will be traveling during the >Advent/Christmas season. > >Does anyone have suggestions for two part (mixed voices) anthems? > >Thanks, > > >Tom Gregory > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Advent/Christmas Anthems From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 18:44:08 -0000   Carols for Choirs 3 is for female voices, but you could perhaps adapt some of those arrangements.   Tim BW   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Bud/Burgie > Sent: 02 November 1999 18:00 > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Advent/Christmas Anthems > > > Look in the Morning Star Choir Book series (3 vols) from > Concordia. > > Cheers, > > Bud > -----Original Message----- > From: tgregory@speeddial.net <tgregory@speeddial.net> > To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Tuesday, November 02, 1999 3:41 AM > Subject: Advent/Christmas Anthems > > > >Greetings: > > > >I have found that many of my choir members will be > traveling during the > >Advent/Christmas season. > > > >Does anyone have suggestions for two part (mixed voices) > anthems? > > > >Thanks, > > > > > >Tom Gregory > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: An organ CD for those who are thinking of transcriptions From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 31 Oct 1999 13:35:57 -0000     >Thank you so much for that post. I really want to find and purchase the entire >works of JS Bach on CD, but I can't afford to pay a mint for them. Any other >suggestions would be appreciated. I need the easiest pieces of Bach that = I can >find. I also have to listen to them to make sure that I have the tempo correct, >etc, etc..... > >Gray     I was in Boston, MA last week (I will email to tell you all about it = later!) and in "Tower Records" there was the complete works of Bach for about $40 = - good huh?!   Richard    
(back) Subject: A Useless Piece of Information (Was: London) From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 31 Oct 1999 20:40:52 -0000   >the current Director of Music at St Paul's in London is John Scott (since >1990 or thereabouts) John Scott has held every organists post at St Paul's. he started off as organ scholar and worked his way up.   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Tips to deal with performance anxiety From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 21:28:10 -0000   >Isn't it neat when the real "biggies" give us a little clue that they're >human, too!   Once at the Oundle Organ Festival, John Scott (the organist of St Paul's = and probably one of the top 5 organists in the UK) was playing the Poulenc = Organ Concerto, he went to press one of the composition pedals, but slipped and hit a load of pedals - he wasn't very happy (he isn't known for his good temper!)!!!   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Transcription Performers From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 21:33:32 -0000   > Finally, the current generation of young organists (myself >included) seems more interested in transcribing--as evidenced by many >concert programmes publishes in TAO. Give it another decade or so, and I >think we'll see some real hummers!     If I really like a piece I will try to transcribe it for organ - then it gives the satisfaction of playing a piece you like, and showing of your transcription skills (of which mine are few!!)   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Transcription Performers From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 21:36:07 -0000   >In Britain Tom Trotter is probably the best exponent; although it seems = to >be 'allowed' for others to do it now as well! I'm playing Meistersingers at >King's College Chapel on 13th November, along with the Scherzo from a >Midsummer Night's Dream (in an arrangement by Gordon Balch Nevin, kindly >provided by Leslie Peart), the Angel Scene from Hansel and Gretel >(Humperdinck/Lemare) and Brahms' Haydn variations (Rogg). Stephen = Cleobury >seems to be happy for this music to be played in KCC! >Tim Byram-Wigfield (lately Edinburgh, now Jesus College, Camb)     He let David Briggs do it too - David has released a couple of CD's of transcriptions.   Richard.   P.S. Enjoy your recital, the organ at Kings is like a Rolls Royce as I'm sure you know!!!    
(back) Subject: Plainsong - psalms From: "Paul Austin" <paul.p.austin@talk21.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 23:23:40 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000C_01BF2589.4DBC5A40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hello all.   It has been several years since we have sung plainsong and psalms to =3D traditional chants at our church. However, it has been decided to use =3D such music at our Sunday evening Eucharist once again. This has been =3D suggested by our new Parish Priest and I must say I am very pleased as I = =3D enjoy playing this kind of music. The problem is that the congregation = =3D have no idea how to sing this music and normally stand in silence with a = =3D look of shock on their faces and it turns into a choir solo.   Could anyone suggest a way of introducing the regular congregation to =3D this new (to them) genre so that they might enjoy and participate more =3D wholeheartedly. I understand that this 'archaic' style isn't everyone's = =3D cup of tea.   To give you an idea, we take our chants from The St Nicolas Chant Book, = =3D published in London by The Faith Press Ltd. It contains some wonderful = =3D chants by composers such as Purcell, Hilton Stewart, Wesley etc., etc.   I would be grateful for any advice.   Regards,   Paul Austin. paul.p.austin@talk21.com   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000C_01BF2589.4DBC5A40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hello all.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>It has been several years since we = have =3D sung=3D20 plainsong and psalms to traditional chants at our church.&nbsp; However, = =3D it has=3D20 been decided to use such music at our Sunday evening Eucharist once =3D again.&nbsp;=3D20 This has been suggested by our new Parish Priest and I must say I am =3D very=3D20 pleased as I enjoy playing this kind of music.&nbsp; The problem is that = =3D the=3D20 congregation have no idea how to sing this music and normally stand in =3D silence=3D20 with a look of shock on their faces and it turns into a choir =3D solo.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Could anyone suggest a way =3D of&nbsp;introducing the=3D20 regular congregation to this new (to them) genre so that they might =3D enjoy and=3D20 participate more wholeheartedly.&nbsp; I understand that this 'archaic' = =3D style=3D20 isn't everyone's cup of tea.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>To give you an idea, we take our = chants =3D from The St=3D20 Nicolas Chant Book, published in London by The Faith Press Ltd.&nbsp; It = =3D   contains some wonderful chants by composers such as Purcell, Hilton =3D Stewart,=3D20 Wesley etc., etc.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I would be grateful for any =3D advice.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Regards,</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Paul Austin.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:paul.p.austin@talk21.com">paul.p.austin@talk21.com</A></FO= =3D NT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000C_01BF2589.4DBC5A40--    
(back) Subject: Rhosymedre - text From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 18:11:00 -0600   I have been wondering whether during Vaughan Williams' time there was a = hymn in the Hymns Ancient and Modern or other equivalent Anglican tome using = the tune Rhosymedre. In looking around what meager resources I have, I = noticed there was no use of the tune in the 1972 (?) HA&M (I don't have the most current version there). The current Lutheran Book of Worship uses it = twice: once to "My song is love unknown", and again to "O Father, by whose name". Our own Episcopal Hymnal 1982 uses it to the latter of those texts, and I don't recall the tune in the 1940 hymnal, although it may lurk there.   Just curious,   Glenda Sutton            
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 18:55:01 -0600   > Paul Austin wrote: > > Hello all. > > It has been several years since we have sung plainsong and psalms to > traditional chants at our church. However, it has been decided to use > such music at our Sunday evening Eucharist once again. This has been > suggested by our new Parish Priest and I must say I am very pleased as > I enjoy playing this kind of music. The problem is that the > congregation have no idea how to sing this music and normally stand in > silence with a look of shock on their faces and it turns into a choir > solo. > > Could anyone suggest a way of introducing the regular congregation to > this new (to them) genre so that they might enjoy and participate more > wholeheartedly. I understand that this 'archaic' style isn't > everyone's cup of tea. > > To give you an idea, we take our chants from The St Nicolas Chant > Book, published in London by The Faith Press Ltd. It contains some > wonderful chants by composers such as Purcell, Hilton Stewart, Wesley > etc., etc.   I can tell you about reintroducing Anglican chant for the psalms. Ours is a small Episcopal congregation of 200 members, generally around 80 communicants at the main Sunday service, with a choir of 14. We reintroduced Anglican chant about three years ago and have done it successfully now with two different music directors. We started off with the *Anglican Chant Psalter* but have for the last year been pointing the chants ourselves, avoiding things which the congregation finds difficult. In our experience this involves avoiding all instances where the reciting note is omitted, and trying not to have too many instances of two syllables on one note (i.e. triplets and quadruplets) -- though we do find it necessary to have some. (One thing that helps to avoid them is to have more instances of two notes on the same syllable, which the congregation doesn't seem to find a problem.) We find it important to have the pointing written out and to give a copy to the congregation. (We have discovered that some people don't bother to open their prayer books or hymnals, but most of them seem to follow in the service leaflet, and this curiously results in the fact that sometimes the singing in the psalm is better than the hymns.)   While I personally love the music of more recent composers like Herbert Howells, these rather tend to concentrate on texture at the expense of melody, and for a congregation it is important to have a melody people can latch onto. We therefore tend to use Victorian chants by composers like Turle, S.S. Wesley, Ouseley, Goss, Stainer, etc. We also try to avoid chants that have high notes above D. (There are around five dozen Victorian double chants and they are posted on the Choral Public Domain Library at http://www.cpdl.org ) Oddly enough although all the textbooks tell you that congregations have difficulty with passing notes in chants, we have not found any evidence that this is the case and they seem quite happy with these.   When we first started off the choir sang in unison to give the congregation a strong lead, but in the last two or three months we have gone over to harmony and the congregation still seems to manage all right. We are even thinking of doing the cantoris decani thing if we can get enough choir members.   It is important that the accompanists should know what they are doing. In my experience if a church has difficulty with doing Anglican chant it is more likely to be the fault of the accompanist than of the choir or congregation.   John Speller, St. Mark's, St. Louis.  
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 19:38:17 -0600   One rule is consistency - we have been singing Anglican chant since about 1991, introduced by the priest then. I have noticed a trend here in the deep South that more and more priests/ministers are weak or deficient in singing, and therefore shun the chant. However, I have been a staunch supporter of keeping it as part of our service, and have been successful = so far.   If one will start with a couple or three melodies, allowing the = congregation to get comfortable with them before introducing new ones, I find it helps them to participate more. I have no choir, but still have a good participation rate among my congregation. However, a choir helps a great deal. And you really need to do it every week until they fall into the routine of expecting it.   John is right - the accompanist needs to know what he/she is doing, and = the psalm needs to be pointed with care.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: a few more Page clues?? From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 20:20:21 -0600   Greetings, everyone, and thanks to all who have responded to my plea for information yesterday.   After spending much of the day sorting pipework from the organ, I've noticed a few small things that might mean something more to somebody. I pass them on, in the hope that they will.   First, it is starting to occur to me that there is a greater chance than I'd previously thought that this organ was actually built for a church. There are indeed 15 rks, not counting the Cornet III that is obviously (now) not original to the organ. Though many of the pipes still sorta scream "THEATRE" to me, I'm realizing that they could have been included = in a church organ built by a Co. that built both types of instruments. I'll include the list of ranks at the end of this note, in case anyone might recognize something.   Now, to the "numbers game"...<G> I've discovered several things...   The 5-digit number I included in yesterday's note does, indeed, appear on low C's of several ranks of pipes. HOWEVER... so do several *other* 5-digit numbers. This leads me to believe that these are, in fact, Gottfried production/order/etc. numbers. (all metal pipes do appear to be Gottfried.) One set of wood flutes has a number (223) written in pencil = on its face. Junchen says that Page built many of their own wood pipes, so maybe there's a clue here...?   Now there's the matter of dates (years, actually): I've found 2, scribed onto 2 of the reed stops. An English Horn pipe has "1929" on its tenor C, and an American Horn pipe has a more complete inscription. Best as I can make it out, it reads "Designed by / A Gottfried / for Mr King / Nov. 1934 / The A. Gottfried Comp / ERIE PA / A440 / W 7 3/4". According to Junchen again, Nov of '34 would be a few months too late for the Page Co to have been building organs, so perhaps I'm seeing it wrong. (anyone know who = "Mr King" might be??)   As yesterday, if any of this means something to anybody, I'll appreciate the help in determining the origin of this organ. Thank you all, again, for your help.   RANK LIST: Page Organ (not seperated by division, etc) most rks 73 notes   8' Open Diapason I 8' Open Diapason II 8' Violin Diapason 16' Bass Flute (97 p, wood, treble octaves open harmonic) 8' Gedeckt (stopped wood) 8' Tibia (stopped wood, leathered lips) 4' Rohrflute (metal) 4' Harmonic Flute (metal) 8' Viole de Orchestre 8' Salicional 8' Erzahler 8' American Horn (Am. Cornet on stoptab) 8' English Horn 8' Clarinet 8' Vox Humana III Cornet (not original -- comprosed from other stops of unknown origin)     Tim Bovard Nichols and Simpson, Inc., Organbuilders Little Rock, AR <tmbovard@arkansas.net>    
(back) Subject: Re: Complete JSB From: Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 20:28:42 -0600   >I was in Boston, MA last week (I will email to tell you all about it = later!) >and in "Tower Records" there was the complete works of Bach for about $40 = - >good huh?!   Well, not all Bach integrales are created equal...who's recording was it?   Rob      
(back) Subject: Re: Rhosymedre - text From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 20:47:54 -0600   Glenda wrote: > > I have been wondering whether during Vaughan Williams' time there was a = hymn > in the Hymns Ancient and Modern or other equivalent Anglican tome using = the > tune Rhosymedre. In looking around what meager resources I have, I = noticed > there was no use of the tune in the 1972 (?) HA&M (I don't have the most > current version there).   Ralph Vaughan Williams was himself the music editor of the *English Hymnal* (1906), and the tune is found there as No. 303, although under the English name of "Lovely" rather than the Welsh "Rhosymedre." It is also in the recent *New English Hymnal*, No. 274, where it is called "Lovely (Rhosymedre)". It was not in either the Standard or Revised edition of *Hymns Ancient & Modern*, but is in the more recent New Standard edition as No. 505, where it is called "Rhosymedre." It is found under that name in the Episcopal *Hymnal of 1982*, No. 587, to the words "Our Father by whose Name", also in the *Hymnal of 1940*, No. 504, to the same words, but was not in the *Hymnal of 1916.*   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Complete JSB From: "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1999 08:51:22 -0600   OHS has a 12 CD set, complete Bach Organ Works for 59.95   Is that a good deal?   jch        
(back) Subject: Re: Rhosymedre - text From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 22:24:21 -0500 (EST)   Excerpts from mail: 2-Nov-99 Re: Rhosymedre - text by "John L. = Speller"@stlnet > Ralph Vaughan Williams was himself the music editor of the *English > Hymnal* (1906), and the tune is found there as No. 303, although under > the English name of "Lovely" rather than the Welsh "Rhosymedre."   Correct, John, but Glenda wants to know what TEXT it's associated with at EH303.   It's Chaz Wesley's 'Author of life divine'.   The other hymnal with which RVW was associated was Percy Dearmer's "Songs of Praise". In the enlarged edition of 1931 Rhosymedre is set at SP127 to Samuel Crossman's 'My song is love unknown'.   Hope that helps, Glenda. Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Complete JSB From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 23:27:12 -0600   jchabermaas wrote:   > OHS has a 12 CD set, complete Bach Organ Works for 59.95 > > Is that a good deal?   To some extent I tend to agree with Bob: whether or not it is a good dealdepends upon several factors, including:   "Who is the performer?"   "When was it made?" and, of course for many of us,   "How much does it cost?"   I would submit, however, that there is a more important question to be answered before you start to answer any of these questions:   "Why do you want to buy a (particular) set of the complete works of JSB; are you just looking to finally get one? are you dissatisfied with your interpretation of some particular work, and looking for new and different ideas? do you really like a parti- ular organist, and want to collect a copy of all of his recordings?   When you have answered these questions, it will become readily apparent whether the price of a particular set is a good one for you, or not.   The answer to this question