PipeChat Digest #1144 - Wednesday, November 3, 1999
 
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Rhosymedre - text
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
RE: Plainsong - psalms
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
RE: Rhosymedre - text
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 22:13:38 -0800   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0045_01BF257F.83562B40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Subject: Plainsong - psalms =3D20 =3D20 Hello all. =3D20 It has been several years since we have sung plainsong and psalms to = =3D traditional chants at our church. =3D20 =3D20 (snip) =3D20 Could anyone suggest a way of introducing the regular congregation =3D to this new (to them) genre so that they might enjoy and participate =3D more wholeheartedly. I understand that this 'archaic' style isn't =3D everyone's cup of tea. =3D20 (snip) =3D20 I would be grateful for any advice. =3D20 Regards, =3D20 Paul Austin. paul.p.austin@talk21.com =3D20 St. Matthew's had never sung the Psalms to Anglican OR Gregorian =3D Chant until I came. The Rector determined that we would do it. Period. =3D So we did. We started with the Gradual Psalm at Mass. =3D20 We started with Anglican chants that are vaguely familiar from Sung = =3D Mattins, which most older people remember. We changed the tune =3D seasonally ... =3D20 (1) Advent-Christmas-Epiphany (2) Septuagesima-Holy Week (3) Easter Day - Trinity Sunday (4) June-July-August (5) September-October-November =3D20 I started out by printing the words and music in full, verse by =3D verse (soprano part only), but INCLUDING the pointing, so they could see = =3D the connection between what the notes were doing and what the pointing =3D was indicating. We have a good computer system and copying machine, so I = =3D was able to make folded inserts for the service leaflet for the =3D congregation. =3D20 I took care to choose chants where the first soprano note of the =3D mediation and cadence was NOT the same as the recitation, so the =3D pointing made sense even if you weren't seeing the changing harmony =3D underneath. =3D20 I still write out everything for the choir, since we're an =3D Anglo-Catholic church and have a LOT of music to bring to life with only = =3D a 2 1/2 hour rehearsal each week. It's more work for me, but it saves =3D TONS of rehearsal time. Sung Psalmody has never been common in the =3D American Church, so there's no tradition of singing from pointing alone. = =3D   =3D20 But now I can print only the pointing in the service-leaflet for the = =3D congregation, and they sing lustily. =3D20 BTW, we still sing the congregational Gradual Psalm in unison ... =3D the choir sings the Offertory and Communion Psalms in harmony. If I want = =3D the congregation to sing for those, we sing alternate verses: =3D20 1-3-5, etc. -choir in harmony 2-4-6, etc. - people and choir in unison =3D20 All this is indicated in the printed-out and pointed words in the =3D service-leaflet. =3D20 We use Gregorian psalmody exclusively at Mattins and Evensong ... =3D THAT I write out, verse by verse, in Gregorian notation, since I also =3D teach in our seminary, and the seminarians have to learn Gregorian =3D notation anyway ... they are the core of my mens' choir for Mattins and = =3D Evensong. =3D20 BUT, after a few short talks to various groups in the congregation =3D (mens' group, womens' guild, Altar Guild, seminarians, adult Sunday =3D School class, etc.), they also read it right off. "Here's 'doh' ... this = =3D is the intonation; this is the flex; this is the first recitation; this = =3D is the mediation; this is the second recitation; this is the cadence of = =3D Tone 1 ... " and so forth. I made a "Tonale" of all the Tones and went =3D through that with all the groups, and at parish soup-and-bread suppers =3D during Lent. =3D20 I include the pointing along with the music, and they CAN sing some = =3D of the simpler tones (1,2,4,5,6 and 8, but not 3 or 7) with just the =3D pointing if I don't have time to write out the Psalms that week, but =3D we're in the process of accumulating a fully-notated Gregorian Psalter, = =3D which should be finished in a year or so, since we don't sing Office =3D every day. =3D20 I adopted the same plan with the Gregorian Tones ... I started with = =3D Tone 8, which everybody sorta vaguely knows ... then the very simplest =3D versions of Tone 1, Tone 4, Tone 5, Tone 6, and Tone 2 (last, so they =3D wouldn't confuse it with Tone 8) ... they still struggle a little with 3 = =3D and 7, since the mediations and cadences are VERY flexible and can have = =3D MANY redundant notes. =3D20 We also had brief congregational rehearsals at Mass for a few weeks = =3D at announcement-time. We have a piano in the church, as well as the =3D organ, so I pounded out tones and chants on the piano for a few weeks. =3D20 Central to all of this was the unqualified support of the Rector, =3D who preached for several weeks on the spirituality of chanting in =3D general and the Psalms in particular. We also have MANY weekly Bible =3D classes, and he took the cause to them as well ... I practiced with the = =3D ones that meet at the church ... I can't see well enough to drive around = =3D strange neighborhoods at night and find unfamiliar homes ... our =3D parishioners are scattered all over the county. =3D20 So ... we did a pretty intense total-immersion kind of thing for the = =3D better part of a year. The result: tonight at Evensong for All Souls' =3D Day, the congregation sight-read both the Psalms and the Canticles =3D flawlessly, and without a choir to lead them, except for four of the men = =3D in the chancel. =3D20 It wasn't ALL smooth sailing ... in America, older low-church folks = =3D HATE chanting in ANY form ... the first six months, they stood there =3D with pursed lips and GLARED at the Rector, the choir, and me. But, =3D fortunately, they were in the minority, and the rest of the congregation = =3D and the choir eventually kidded them out of their snit. Of course, it =3D didn't HURT that I played all their favorite schmaltzy Victorian hymns, = =3D anthems, and organ music in the bargain (grin). =3D20 I don't know what size your parish is ... St. Matthew's is small by = =3D American standards (average attendance at High Mass runs anywhere from =3D 50-100; average attendance at Mattins and Evensong runs15-40) ... I was = =3D able to accomplish what I did fairly quickly and fairly easily because =3D I'm also FRIENDS with most of the parishioners ... plus I have a young, = =3D enthusiastic Rector who's VERY well-liked. =3D20 Be happy to answer any further questions... =3D20 Cheers, =3D20 Bud =3D20 =3D20 =3D20 =3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0045_01BF257F.83562B40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Diso-8859-1 =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 = =3D Transitional//EN"> <META content=3D3D'"MSHTML 4.71.1712.3"' name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE>   </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: = =3D 5px"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><B>Subject: </B>Plainsong -=3D20 psalms<BR><BR></DIV></FONT> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hello all.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>It has been several years since = we =3D have sung=3D20 plainsong and psalms to traditional chants at our church.&nbsp;=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>(snip)</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Could anyone suggest a way of =3D introducing the=3D20 regular congregation to this new (to them) genre so that they might = =3D enjoy=3D20 and participate more wholeheartedly.&nbsp; I understand that this =3D 'archaic'=3D20 style isn't everyone's cup of tea.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000 face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style" =3D size=3D3D3>(snip)</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I would be grateful for any=3D20 advice.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Regards,</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Paul Austin.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:paul.p.austin@talk21.com">paul.p.austin@talk21.com</A></FO= =3D NT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>St. Matthew's had never sung the Psalms = =3D to Anglican=3D20 OR Gregorian Chant until I came. The Rector determined that we would = =3D do it.=3D20 Period. So we did. We started with the Gradual Psalm at =3D Mass.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>We started with Anglican chants that are = =3D vaguely=3D20 familiar from Sung Mattins, which most older people remember. We =3D changed the=3D20 tune seasonally ...</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>(1) =3D Advent-Christmas-Epiphany</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>(2) Septuagesima-Holy Week</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>(3) Easter Day - Trinity =3D Sunday</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>(4) June-July-August</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>(5) =3D September-October-November</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>I started out by printing the words and = =3D music in=3D20 full, verse by verse (soprano part only), but INCLUDING the =3D pointing, so=3D20 they could see the connection between what the notes were doing and = =3D what the=3D20 pointing was indicating. We have a good computer system and copying = =3D machine,=3D20 so I was able to make folded inserts for the service leaflet for the = =3D   congregation.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I took care to choose chants where the first soprano note of =3D the=3D20 mediation and cadence was NOT the same as the recitation, so the =3D pointing=3D20 made sense even if you weren't seeing the changing harmony =3D underneath.</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>I still write out everything for the =3D choir, since=3D20 we're an Anglo-Catholic church and have a LOT of music to bring to =3D life with=3D20 only a 2 1/2 hour rehearsal each week. It's more work for me, but it = =3D saves=3D20 TONS of rehearsal time. Sung Psalmody has never been common in the =3D American=3D20 Church, so there's no tradition of singing from pointing alone.=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>But now I can print only the pointing in = =3D the=3D20 service-leaflet for the congregation, and they sing =3D lustily.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>BTW, we still sing the congregational =3D Gradual Psalm=3D20 in unison ... the choir sings the Offertory and Communion Psalms in = =3D harmony.=3D20 If I want the congregation to sing for those, we sing alternate=3D20 verses:</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>1-3-5, etc. -choir in harmony</DIV> <DIV>2-4-6, etc. - people and choir in unison</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>All this is indicated in the printed-out and pointed words in =3D the=3D20 service-leaflet.</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>We use Gregorian psalmody exclusively at = =3D Mattins=3D20 and Evensong ... THAT I write out, verse by verse, in Gregorian =3D notation,=3D20 since I also teach in our seminary, and the seminarians have to =3D learn=3D20 Gregorian notation anyway ... they are the core of my mens' choir =3D for=3D20 Mattins and Evensong.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>BUT, after a few short talks to various = =3D groups in=3D20 the congregation (mens' group, womens' guild, Altar Guild, =3D seminarians,=3D20 adult Sunday School class, etc.), they also read it right off. =3D &quot;Here's=3D20 'doh' ... this is the intonation; this is the flex; this is the =3D first=3D20 recitation; this is the mediation; this is the second recitation; =3D this is=3D20 the cadence of Tone 1 ... &quot; and so forth. I made a =3D &quot;Tonale&quot;=3D20 of all the Tones and went through that with all the groups, and at =3D parish=3D20 soup-and-bread suppers during Lent.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>I include the pointing along with the =3D music, and=3D20 they CAN sing some of the simpler tones (1,2,4,5,6 and 8, but not 3 = =3D or 7)=3D20 with just the pointing if I don't have time to write out the Psalms = =3D that=3D20 week, but we're in the process of accumulating a fully-notated =3D Gregorian=3D20 Psalter, which should be finished in a year or so, since we don't =3D sing=3D20 Office every day.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000>I adopted the same plan with the =3D Gregorian Tones=3D20 ... I started with Tone 8, which everybody sorta vaguely knows ... =3D then the=3D20 very simplest versions of Tone 1, Tone 4, Tone 5, Tone 6, and Tone 2 = =3D (last,=3D20 so they wouldn't confuse it with Tone 8) ... they still struggle a =3D little=3D20 with 3 and 7, since the mediations and cadences are VERY flexible =3D and can=3D20 have MANY redundant notes.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>We also had brief congregational rehearsals at Mass for a few =3D weeks at=3D20 announcement-time. We have a piano in the church, as well as the =3D organ, so I=3D20 pounded out tones and chants on the piano for a few weeks.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Central to all of this was the unqualified support of the =3D Rector, who=3D20 preached for several weeks on the spirituality of chanting in =3D general and=3D20 the Psalms in particular. We also have MANY weekly&nbsp; Bible =3D classes, and=3D20 he took the cause to them as well ... I practiced with the ones that = =3D meet at=3D20 the church ... I can't see well enough to drive around strange =3D neighborhoods=3D20 at night and find unfamiliar homes ... our parishioners are =3D scattered all=3D20 over the county.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>So ... we did a pretty intense total-immersion kind of thing =3D for the=3D20 better part of a year. The result: tonight at Evensong for All =3D Souls' Day,=3D20 the congregation sight-read both the Psalms and the Canticles =3D flawlessly,=3D20 and without a choir to lead them, except for four of the men in = the=3D20 chancel.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>It wasn't ALL smooth sailing ... in America, older low-church =3D folks=3D20 HATE chanting in ANY form ... the first six months, they stood there = =3D with=3D20 pursed lips and GLARED at the Rector, the choir, and me. But, =3D fortunately,=3D20 they were in the minority, and the rest of the congregation and the = =3D choir=3D20 eventually kidded them out of their snit. Of course, it didn't HURT = =3D that I=3D20 played all their favorite schmaltzy Victorian hymns, anthems, and =3D organ=3D20 music in the bargain (grin).</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I don't know what size your parish is ... St. Matthew's is =3D small by=3D20 American standards (average attendance at High Mass runs anywhere =3D from=3D20 50-100; average attendance at Mattins and Evensong runs15-40) ... I = =3D was able=3D20 to accomplish what I did fairly quickly and fairly easily because =3D I'm also=3D20 FRIENDS with most of the parishioners ... plus I have a young, =3D enthusiastic=3D20 Rector who's VERY well-liked.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Be happy to answer any further questions...</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Cheers,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Bud</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT =3D color=3D3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0045_01BF257F.83562B40--    
(back) Subject: Re: Rhosymedre - text From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 22:21:47 -0800   Rhosymedre is in the 1906 edition of The English Hymnal (which Vaughn Williams edited) at #303, where it is called by its other name, "Lovely" ... the text is "Author of life divine, Who hast a table spread"; it does not appear in The Hymnal 1916 of the American Episcopal Church; it is #504 in The Hymnal 1940 with the words "Our Father, by whose Name All fatherhood is known"; I have an old A & M at church ... I'll look, but I imagine if it's not in the original edition, it's surely in A&M(revised) or newer editions.   Cheers,   Bud -----Original Message----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> To: PIPORG-L <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu>; PIPECHAT <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, November 02, 1999 4:12 PM Subject: Rhosymedre - text     >I have been wondering whether during Vaughan Williams' time there was a hymn >in the Hymns Ancient and Modern or other equivalent Anglican tome using the >tune Rhosymedre. In looking around what meager resources I have, I noticed >there was no use of the tune in the 1972 (?) HA&M (I don't have the most >current version there). The current Lutheran Book of Worship uses it twice: >once to "My song is love unknown", and again to "O Father, by whose name". >Our own Episcopal Hymnal 1982 uses it to the latter of those texts, and I >don't recall the tune in the 1940 hymnal, although it may lurk there. > >Just curious, > >Glenda Sutton > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 03 Nov 1999 01:57:51 -0600       Paul Austin wrote:   > Hello all. It has been several years since we have sung plainsong and > psalms to traditional chants at our church. However, it has been > decided to use such music at our Sunday evening Eucharist once again. > This has been suggested by our new Parish Priest and I must say I am > very pleased as I enjoy playing this kind of music. The problem is > that the congregation have no idea how to sing this music and normally > stand in silence with a look of shock on their faces and it turns into > a choir solo. Could anyone suggest a way of introducing the regular > congregation to this new (to them) genre so that they might enjoy and > participate more wholeheartedly. I understand that this 'archaic' > style isn't everyone's cup of tea. To give you an idea, we take our > chants from The St Nicolas Chant Book, published in London by The > Faith Press Ltd. It contains some wonderful chants by composers such > as Purcell, Hilton Stewart, Wesley etc., etc. I would be grateful for > any advice. > > >   One suggestion I would make is to pick one or two chants, and use the same one or two for a month or two, to give the congregation a chance to reall learn particular chants. Also, rather than the cathedral style dec/can alternation, use alternate whole chant by whole chant between choir and choir + congregation, always starting with the choir alone. Finally, the organist should use good, strong 8+4 registration on congration verses, and if (s)he feels the desire to embelish accompaniments, to do so only on the choir verses.   Finally, why not rehearse the chant with the congregation just before the processional?    
(back) Subject: RE: Plainsong - psalms From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1999 08:07:33 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0006_01BF25D2.7BB6CA40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Anglican chanting by congregations has all but died out here in the U.K. The only thing I could suggest is to introduce it gradually, and get them = to here the choir sing it on their own for a few Sundays. For the Eucharist, you could introduce, say, the Sanctus and Benendictus from the Missa De Angelis , or from Misa Orbis Factor   The same goes for anglican chant. You have a number of difficulties, not least the chanting of the rhythm of the words. Again, maybe you could = repeat a short psalm each week...   It won't necessarily be a choir solo if you encourage the congregation to join in. The Choir is at least then fulfilling its major function.. I think it will mean a congregational rehearsal or two however!     Tim BW -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Paul Austin Sent: 02 November 1999 23:24 To: Pipechat Subject: Plainsong - psalms     Hello all.   It has been several years since we have sung plainsong and psalms to traditional chants at our church. However, it has been decided to use = such music at our Sunday evening Eucharist once again. This has been suggested by our new Parish Priest and I must say I am very pleased as I enjoy = playing this kind of music. The problem is that the congregation have no idea how to sing this music and normally stand in silence with a look of shock on their faces and it turns into a choir solo.   Could anyone suggest a way of introducing the regular congregation to this new (to them) genre so that they might enjoy and participate more wholeheartedly. I understand that this 'archaic' style isn't everyone's = cup of tea.   To give you an idea, we take our chants from The St Nicolas Chant = Book, published in London by The Faith Press Ltd. It contains some wonderful chants by composers such as Purcell, Hilton Stewart, Wesley etc., etc.   I would be grateful for any advice.   Regards,   Paul Austin. paul.p.austin@talk21.com   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0006_01BF25D2.7BB6CA40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE>   </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D   size=3D3D2>Anglican chanting by congregations has all but died out here in = =3D the=3D20 U.K.&nbsp; The only thing I could suggest is to introduce it gradually, = =3D and get=3D20 them to here the choir sing it on their own for a few Sundays.&nbsp; For = =3D the=3D20 Eucharist, you could introduce, say,&nbsp; the Sanctus and Benendictus =3D from the=3D20 Missa De Angelis , or from Misa Orbis Factor</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D   size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D size=3D3D2>The=3D20 same goes for anglican chant.&nbsp; You have a number of difficulties, =3D not least=3D20 the chanting of the rhythm of the words. Again, maybe you could repeat a = =3D short=3D20 psalm each week...</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D   size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D size=3D3D2>It=3D20 won't necessarily be a choir solo if you encourage the congregation to =3D join=3D20 in.&nbsp; The Choir is at least then fulfilling its major =3D function..&nbsp; I=3D20 think it will mean a congregational rehearsal or two=3D20 however!</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D   size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D880230108-03111999><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff = face=3D3DArial =3D size=3D3D2>Tim=3D20 BW</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: = =3D 5px"> <DIV class=3D3DOutlookMessageHeader><FONT face=3D3D"Times New = Roman"=3D20 size=3D3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]<B>On Behalf Of</B> Paul=3D20 Austin<BR><B>Sent:</B> 02 November 1999 23:24<BR><B>To:</B>=3D20 Pipechat<BR><B>Subject:</B> Plainsong - psalms<BR><BR></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hello all.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>It has been several years since = we =3D have sung=3D20 plainsong and psalms to traditional chants at our church.&nbsp; =3D However, it=3D20 has been decided to use such music at our Sunday evening Eucharist =3D once=3D20 again.&nbsp; This has been suggested by our new Parish Priest and I = =3D must say=3D20 I am very pleased as I enjoy playing this kind of music.&nbsp; The =3D problem=3D20 is that the congregation have no idea how to sing this music and =3D normally=3D20 stand in silence with a look of shock on their faces and it turns =3D into a=3D20 choir solo.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Could anyone suggest a way =3D of&nbsp;introducing=3D20 the regular congregation to this new (to them) genre so that they =3D might=3D20 enjoy and participate more wholeheartedly.&nbsp; I understand that =3D this=3D20 'archaic' style isn't everyone's cup of tea.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>To give you an idea, we take our = =3D chants from=3D20 The St Nicolas Chant Book, published in London by The Faith Press =3D Ltd.&nbsp;=3D20 It contains some wonderful chants by composers such as Purcell, =3D Hilton=3D20 Stewart, Wesley etc., etc.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I would be grateful for any=3D20 advice.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Regards,</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Paul Austin.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:paul.p.austin@talk21.com">paul.p.austin@talk21.com</A></FO= =3D NT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0006_01BF25D2.7BB6CA40--    
(back) Subject: RE: Rhosymedre - text From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1999 08:11:23 -0000   Dear Glenda,   In the English Hymnal (first published 1906) which was edited by Ralph Vaghan Williams, Hymn No 303 uses the Tune "Rhosymedre" or "Lovely." The words are "Author of life divine", a 2 verse hymn by Charles Wesley.   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Glenda > Sent: 03 November 1999 00:11 > To: PIPORG-L; PIPECHAT > Subject: Rhosymedre - text > > > I have been wondering whether during Vaughan Williams' time there > was a hymn > in the Hymns Ancient and Modern or other equivalent Anglican tome > using the > tune Rhosymedre. In looking around what meager resources I have, > I noticed > there was no use of the tune in the 1972 (?) HA&M (I don't have the most > current version there). The current Lutheran Book of Worship > uses it twice: > once to "My song is love unknown", and again to "O Father, by whose = name". > Our own Episcopal Hymnal 1982 uses it to the latter of those texts, and = I > don't recall the tune in the 1940 hymnal, although it may lurk there. > > Just curious, > > Glenda Sutton > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >