PipeChat Digest #1150 - Saturday, November 6, 1999
 
RE: AGO contacts
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
RE: Plainsong - psalms
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
Re: A quick question about bananas and performance anxiety
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: Complete JSB
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: William Harris, English composer
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Plainsong - psalms - Correction
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Plainsong - psalms
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Various things Anglican and the revisionist mind-set
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
choral vs. congregational settings
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: A quick question about bananas and performance anxiety
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: choral vs. congregational settings
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Various things Anglican and the revisionist mind-set
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: RE: AGO contacts From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 11:24:27 -0000   THanks Malcolm and David   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > David Scribner > Sent: 05 November 1999 19:54 > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: AGO contacts > > > >Dear All, > > > >Can anyone advise me if the Chapter contacts for the AGO are online > >anywhere - or where I might otherwise obtain that information? > > > > > >Tim B-W > >Cambridge > > Go to http://www.agohq.org - there is a listing of all the Chapters > and also links to the various Chapter web sites. > > David > > *********************************** > David C. Scribner > Sub-Dean and Editor, THE WEST FLORIDA ORGANIST > Pensacola Chapter, AGO > http://www.pensacola-ago.org > mailto:ago@pensacola-ago.org > 850-478-9635 - V > 850-476-0711 - F > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: RE: Plainsong - psalms From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 11:36:01 -0000   yes it is sung by the choirs in Cathedrals. What I meant was that congregational singing of Anglican chant has all but died out. When I was assistant at Winchester the congregation sang the Venite, and one of the canticles to chant, but with limited musical success. As far as I know = that practice still happens....   Tim BW   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Roy Wilson > Sent: 06 November 1999 07:04 > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Cc: t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk > Subject: RE: Plainsong - psalms > > > Tim: > > Is Anglican chant not done still in the cathedral churches in the UK? = It > never was intended for the parish churches, although some unique = churches > are able to do it rather well. > > Roy Wilson > > > > > > >Anglican chanting by congregations has all but died out here in the = U.K. > > ______________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: A quick question about bananas and performance anxiety From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 07:14:57 -0800   At 07:44 PM 11/05/1999 -0600, you wrote: >Now how many do I need to eat before performing? Tonight's rehearsal was >painful, in more ways than one (I have messed up my back somehow...).   Find yourself a good Chiropractor, one who will work on the back and leave the metaphysics alone... I have a back problem, probably borne of years = of riding a motorcycle, and usually if it 'goes out', a simple adjustment = will get my spine realigned, and the pain will be substantially diminished.   Regards,   Bob   http://www.jps.net/rrloesch   Time flies whether you're having fun or not!   The best things in life aren't THINGS.  
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 08:29:55 -0800   I don't agree totally ... up until "The Troubles" and "The Changes", any Morning Prayer congregation in the U.S. worth its salt could sing Venite, Te Deum, Benedictus es, Benedicite, Benedictus and Jubilate to Anglican chant ... you ARE right in that singing the Psalms in general and Evensong in particular either never got established, or (more likely) died out whilst all the choir men were away at WWII ... before that, Sunday Evensong was a regular part of the schedule, at least in city churches ... the congregational settings of the Mass in the '40 Hymnal also reflect the sea change that event brought about ... congregational settings were virtually unknown before then.   And when I last visited England (in the late '60s), there were still Psalters in the pews of at least some of the parish churches.   BUT ... St. Matthew's is living proof that all it takes to re-establish it is a supportive Rector and a little elbow grease. OK, a LOT of elbow grease, and a good copy machine (grin). Get a copy of the Oxford-American Psalter and convert the MARKS of the pointing to something people can READ (without changing the excellent pointing itself, however), MARK who's supposed to sing what, and whether in unison or harmony, choose a SHORT list of (formerly) FAMILIAR tunes from the '40 Hymnal, and get to it.   It's helpful to sing it antiphonally or responsorially ... as the Rector pointed out, alternating between the cantors or the choir and the congregation admits the possibility that at least 50% of the verses will be sung RIGHT (grin) .... actually, our people do considerably better than that.   I presume something similar has been put out for the "telephone-book" Psalter in the new Prayer Book, though why anyone would want to sing that turgid prose is quite beyond me (sigh). When "The waters come in", they are come in "even unto my SOUL"; they CERTAINLY do not come in "up to my NECK" (!).   Far from being a bit of musical and liturgical antiquarianism, I have seen the orderly chanting of the Psalter make a real difference in the spirituality of our people ... there's a VERY different "feel" to Mattins, Evensong and Mass when the people sing those ancient hymns from their hearts.   And, BTW, it's no harder to do the same thing with Gregorian psalmody ... we switch back and forth on a regular basis ... if we sing the Canticles to the Gregorian Tones, we sing the Psalms to Anglican chant, and vice versa. We tend to do more Gregorian during Advent and Lent; from Ash Wednesday onward EVERYTHING is Gregorian ... I guess nobody ever told our people it was supposed to be HARD to sing Psalms (grin).   And remember, this is a SMALL parish with a SMALL congregation and a SMALL choir and a HORRENDOUS "organ".   Cheers,   Bud     >Tim: > >Is Anglican chant not done still in the cathedral churches in the UK? It >never was intended for the parish churches, although some unique churches >are able to do it rather well. > >Roy Wilson > > > >> >>Anglican chanting by congregations has all but died out here in the U.K. >      
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw Date: Sun, 7 Nov 1999 00:43:55 +0800 (CST)       On Sat, 6 Nov 1999, Bud/Burgie wrote:   > I don't agree totally ... up until "The Troubles" and "The > Changes", any Morning Prayer congregation in the U.S. worth > its salt could sing Venite, Te Deum, Benedictus es, > Benedicite, Benedictus and Jubilate to Anglican chant ...   Ummmm .... Venite, yes; Jubilate, yes; Benedictus es, yes; Benedictus, yes; Benedicte, well not all congregations could do that ... it is a long chant... Te Deum, if done often enough, yes....   Don't forget the Venite # 612 in The Hymnal 1940 ... my home church sang it with much gusto.... yes, you did have to be careful.... there were three harmonizations (marked with a, b, and c next to the verses) of the same melody...   > the congregational settings of the Mass in the '40 Hymnal also > reflect the sea change that event brought about ... > congregational settings were virtually unknown before then.   I rather liked singing Merbecke and Willan when I was a kid in the junior choir of my home church....   The first time I subbed for my home church (it was either me or no one... try getting a sub in the DC area on a Saturday for the next day...) I played the George Oldroyd service, much to the astonishment of the choir, who were so surprised I could do it... so surprised they could hardly sing it...     > BUT ... St. Matthew's is living proof that all it takes to > re-establish it is a supportive Rector and a little elbow > grease. OK, a LOT of elbow grease, and a good copy machine > (grin). Get a copy of the Oxford-American Psalter and > convert the MARKS of the pointing to something people can > READ (without changing the excellent pointing itself, > however), MARK who's supposed to sing what, and whether in > unison or harmony, choose a SHORT list of (formerly) > FAMILIAR tunes from the '40 Hymnal, and get to it.     Yes, it is too bad that none of these familiar tunes made it into The Hymnal 1982. Can anyone tell me why? What was wrong with the Anglican chant tunes in the 1940 Hymnal? "An inquiring mind would like to know."   As for the Gregorian, well there are some Gregorian chants my home = churchcan sing for communion if they rector wants the choir to....     Best wishes to all...     Morton Belcher fellow Anglican-Music list member  
(back) Subject: Re: Complete JSB From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 17:46:36 -0000   >I had the opportunity to hear Marie-Claire last week, both in concert and >at a master class. She did a really rockin' Prelude & Fugue in E Minor >(The Wedge) as well as Balbastre, de Grigny, Franck, and both Alains. At >73 she is quite energetic and well preserved, looks better than her >publicity photo. I was amazed to find out she is quite petite, no taller >than I am (5'1").     Is she only 73. I asked my organ teacher as a joke when he is going to introduce me to her (she was his teacher) and he said that it would have = to be soon because she is nearly 90!!!   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: William Harris, English composer From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 17:53:11 -0000   >> Sir William Harris (1883-1973) was a Professor at the Royal College of >> Music and Organist of St. George's Chapel, Windsor. My old organ >> teacher was one of his pupils. One of his duties was to teach Princess >> Elizabeth (now the Queen) and Princess Margaret to sing madrigals, and >> my teacher used to get roped in to sing one of the male voices with >> them.     What a drag!!!    
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 13:10:32 -0600   Bud/Burgie wrote:   > the > congregational settings of the Mass in the '40 Hymnal also > reflect the sea change that event brought about ... > congregational settings were virtually unknown before then.   There were, however, congregational settings of the mass in the Episcopal *Hymnal of 1916*. These were arranged as follows:   Responses after the Commandments:   671 Merbecke 672 Tallis 673 S. S. Wesley 674 Samuel Arnold (organist of Westminster Abbey, who, incidentally was the illegitimate son of Princess Amalia, sister of Frederic the Great of Prussia) 675 Edward Hodges (1796-1867, organist of Trinity, Wall, Street, New York) 676 Stainer   Threefold Kyrie:   677 Tallis arr. Barnby 678 Tallis arr. Stainer 679 Merbecke 680 T. Tertius Noble (1867-1953, organist of St. Bartholomew's, New York) 681 Plainsong   Gloria Tibi (Gospel response):   682 Tallis 683 Plainsong 684 George M. Garrett 685 Plainsong   Credo:   686 Merbecke   Sentence at the Presentation of the Alms:   687 Pelham Humphrey (actually his "Grand Chant") 688 arr. from Beethoven   Sursum Corda:   689 Plainsong   Sanctus:   690 Merbecke 691 S. S. Wesley 692 A. S. Cooper 693 Peter C. Lutkin (1858-1931, organist of St. Clement's & St. James, Chicago) 694 Plainsong   The Lord's Prayer:   695 Plainsong 696 Merbecke   Gloria in Excelsis:   697 Merbecke 698 Tallis arr. T. Tertius Noble 699 Old Scottish Chant   Amen:   700 Walter Henry Hall 701 John H. Gower 701 Dresden Amen 703 Stainer Sevenfold Amen   I don't know how widely these were used, but the inclusion of Hodges, Noble and Lutkin, suggests they were at least used in St. Clements, Chicago, St. James, Chicago, St. Bartholomew's, New York and Trinity, Wall Street.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms - Correction From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 13:43:35 -0600   In my preceding e-mail I said that T. Tertius Noble was at St. Bartholomew's, New York. I realized as soon as I had sent it that he was, of course, at St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue. Leopold Stokowski was at St. Bartholomew's.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Plainsong - psalms From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 14:05:37 -0600   flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw wrote: > Ummmm .... Venite, yes; Jubilate, yes; Benedictus es, yes; = Benedictus, > yes; Benedicte, well not all congregations could do that ... it is a > long chant... Te Deum, if done often enough, yes....   The village church in England where I grew up in England (well, really more like suburban Taunton than a village) and where my father was churchwarden for many years, was Ss. Peter & Paul, Bishops Hull, in the Diocese of Bath & Wells. In those days they would get around 50 on a Sunday and would do sung Mattins every week except the first Sunday of the month when there was a sung Eucharist (I seem to remember they did some awful setting by Woodward for the latter.) With Stainer's "Cathedral Psalter" it was Anglican thump all the way, but apart from that they seemed to manage the singing very well. We did the Venite, Psalm, Te Deum and Benedictus Domine all to Anglican chant (with the Benedicite in Lent.) They also did sung Evensong every Sunday, but were lucky to get five or six people at it. Even these, however, seemed to be able to manage the singing. They have a quite good 2/15 1862 Robson tracker organ, restored in 1970.   By contrast today, they have a congregation of 100 -- twice what it used to be (there has been a lot of new housing built in the parish) -- but have abandoned Evensong and like most churches these days have a Eucharist as their main service instead of Mattins. Only the hymns are sung any longer -- the Psalm, Gloria in Excelsis, Sanctus & Benedictus, etc., are all said. Apart from the hymns, the organ voluntaries are the only music. This, in spite of the fact that their resources are better than they used to be. This seems to be a general trend in England, and most parishes are much worse off than Bishops Hull in having fewer resources than they used to. Many no longer even have an organist, even where there is a fine instrument. Music (and not just Anglican chant) seems to be dying out in the Church of England, except in the cathedrals and major churches.   I would say the situation in the Episcopal Church here in the U.S.A. so far is better. Most churches use a mass setting out of the hymnal, and many attempt to sing the psalm one way or another. Here at St. Mark's, St. Louis, they have not had a tradition of doing Evensong regularly since the church was founded 60 years ago, but we have recently instituted a quarterly Choral Evensong. We have also reintroduced Anglican chant for the Psalm at the Eucharist for the first time in thirty years, and the congregation seem to be managing OK in spite of the fact that most of them had never done it before.   John Speller St. Mark's, St. Louis.  
(back) Subject: Various things Anglican and the revisionist mind-set From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 12:16:31 -0800     I recently acquired a full-music edition of the Hymnal 1916, courtesy of Stan Y. It makes for very instructive reading. There were far FEWER changes made going from the 1916 to the 1940 Hymnal than from the 1940 to the 1982. And in SOME cases, the 1916 book was MORE "catholic" than its 1940 successor. It seems that the low-church bishops were much in the ascendancy in the '40s, and the '40 Hymnal reflects that.   Perhaps the saddest thing about the '82 book is that it almost TOTALLY discarded the very scholarly work of Canon Douglas and others in regard to the transcription of Gregorian chant into English. I fail to see how the stemless "mouse droppings" German notation of the Chant gives a clearer idea of both the original neums AND the rhythm than the tried-and-true Solesmes style of notation.   OK, OK, Solesmes is generally denigrated these days as not being HISTORICALLY correct, but it remains the ONLY notation where a musically-literate choir can take up the books and SING from SIGHT with a minimum of additional directions (principally what to do with the horizontal episemas), AND it preserves the original groupings of the neums in modern notation.   As to the Anglican chants and other service music that didn't make it from the '40 to the '82 book: the revisionists were much in evidence in the Music Commission. As with the Prayer Book revision, little attention was paid to the needs OR wants of the average Episcopalian congregation: under 100 members, average age over 40, volunteer organist, probably no choir.   Before I came to St. Matthew's, I served as interim organist in a small parish at the edge of the desert. They hadn't HAD an organist regularly for several years ... I managed to get them to buy a PLAYABLE organ (they had a moribund Hammond Concert Model), and I bulldozed together a small choir.   They had struggled mightily to learn to sing Mass in Rite II to the settings in the '82 book, but most of it was simply beyond them. So this little parish, which had a long, LONG history of Anglo-Catholic worship, had been reduced to hunting up three or four familiar hymns in the '82 book and having Low Mass for the rest.   Now, on the Sundays they had Rite ONE (twice a month), it was a different story: they sang the Mass to the familiar settings with great devotion.   Unfortunately, the Anglican Church was not blessed with composers like Tallis and Byrd THIS time to lead them into the new Book, as they were at the English Reformation.   It seems that within the remnant of the American Episcopal Church there are TWO churches: the "official church" of Headquarters and the various Commissions; and the "grassroots" church of the PEOPLE, who were roundly ignored in the revision of both Prayer Book and Hymnal. And yet MORE revisions are on the horizon.   I noted recently that a resolution is going to be introduced at General Convention in 2000 to allow the use of the 1928 Prayer Book (and presumably the '40 Hymnal), (much like the present pope's permission for the Tridentine Mass) ... but I think it's probably too little and too late.   I hasten to add that both the '28 Prayer Book AND the Tridentine Mass have their deficiencies ... but those are easily rectified without demolishing the whole.   Ah ... the Oldroyd "Mass of the Quiet Hour" (3rd Communion Service) ... I just MAY do the Kyrie, Sanctus and Agnus for Christmas this year (grin).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: choral vs. congregational settings From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 12:28:57 -0800     Yes, BUT ... glancing through the settings, it would seem that except for the Merbecke and the plainsong (and even the Merbecke COULD be sung SATB) they were harmonized settings which would have been sung by the CHOIR. If congregational settings were the norm (both here and in England), then from whence came the HUGE stack of "choral" Masses in English from Faith Press, Dr. Willan, H.W. Gray, Novello, Oxford, etc.? SOMEBODY must have sung them ...   Cheers,   Bud     >Bud/Burgie wrote: > >> the >> congregational settings of the Mass in the '40 Hymnal also >> reflect the sea change that event brought about ... >> congregational settings were virtually unknown before then. > >There were, however, congregational settings of the mass in the >Episcopal *Hymnal of 1916*. These were arranged as follows: > >Responses after the Commandments: > >671 Merbecke >672 Tallis >673 S. S. Wesley >674 Samuel Arnold (organist of Westminster Abbey, who, incidentally > was the illegitimate son of Princess Amalia, > sister of Frederic the Great of Prussia) >675 Edward Hodges (1796-1867, organist of Trinity, Wall, Street, >New York) >676 Stainer > >Threefold Kyrie: > >677 Tallis arr. Barnby >678 Tallis arr. Stainer >679 Merbecke >680 T. Tertius Noble (1867-1953, organist of St. Bartholomew's, >New York) >681 Plainsong > >Gloria Tibi (Gospel response): > >682 Tallis >683 Plainsong >684 George M. Garrett >685 Plainsong > >Credo: > >686 Merbecke > >Sentence at the Presentation of the Alms: > >687 Pelham Humphrey (actually his "Grand Chant") >688 arr. from Beethoven > >Sursum Corda: > >689 Plainsong > >Sanctus: > >690 Merbecke >691 S. S. Wesley >692 A. S. Cooper >693 Peter C. Lutkin (1858-1931, organist of St. Clement's & St. >James, Chicago) >694 Plainsong > >The Lord's Prayer: > >695 Plainsong >696 Merbecke > >Gloria in Excelsis: > >697 Merbecke >698 Tallis arr. T. Tertius Noble >699 Old Scottish Chant > >Amen: > >700 Walter Henry Hall >701 John H. Gower >701 Dresden Amen >703 Stainer Sevenfold Amen > >I don't know how widely these were used, but the inclusion of Hodges, >Noble and Lutkin, suggests they were at least used in St. Clements, >Chicago, St. James, Chicago, St. Bartholomew's, New York and Trinity, >Wall Street. > >John Speller > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: A quick question about bananas and performance anxiety From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 14:55:07 -0600   Let's see - I soaked the bananas in vodka and orange juice (peeling half = the bunch and leaving the peel on the other half), then froze them. I applied them to my lower back with a heating pad for about an hour, then ate them. They weren't that good, but they took my mind off my playing!   Now, what does one do for the queasiness and the freezer burn on one's = back? Do I rub the remaining vodka and orange juice on it? It doesn't seem to affect the pedaling too much, except the Mendelssohn at the beginning and that little rumble in "Stars and Stripes" at the end hurt like - well, you know the rest. If the banana advice and remedy for performance anxiety doesn't kill me, I'll have an excellent reason/excuse if I play poorly tomorrow. However, I still believe in miracles - I put flowers in front = of St. Agatha's statue this afternoon and said a prayer.   Thanks - you are such great friends.   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: choral vs. congregational settings From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 15:12:08 -0600   Bud/Burgie wrote:   > ...<snip>then from > whence came the HUGE stack of "choral" Masses in English > from Faith Press, Dr. Willan, H.W. Gray, Novello, Oxford, > etc.? SOMEBODY must have sung them ...   Probably the same couple of churches in major areas. Thoseparishes which used congregational singing used settings from the Hymnal du jour; the Ascension / Chicago, Old St. Mary's / Kansas City, Advent / Boston, etc., needed thirty or so a year assuming the choir went on hiatus during the summer; if the choir didn't get a break, they needed double that number.   Once the engraving was done, and the initial run was printed, it did not take all that much space in the files. Plates were also probably reused as needed.   > > > Cheers, > > Bud > > >Bud/Burgie wrote: > > > >> the > >> congregational settings of the Mass in the '40 Hymnal > also > >> reflect the sea change that event brought about ... > >> congregational settings were virtually unknown before > then. > > > >There were, however, congregational settings of the mass in > the > >Episcopal *Hymnal of 1916*. These were arranged as > follows: > > > >Responses after the Commandments: > > > >671 Merbecke > >672 Tallis > >673 S. S. Wesley > >674 Samuel Arnold (organist of Westminster Abbey, who, > incidentally > > was the illegitimate son of Princess > Amalia, > > sister of Frederic the Great of Prussia) > >675 Edward Hodges (1796-1867, organist of Trinity, Wall, > Street, > >New York) > >676 Stainer > > > >Threefold Kyrie: > > > >677 Tallis arr. Barnby > >678 Tallis arr. Stainer > >679 Merbecke > >680 T. Tertius Noble (1867-1953, organist of St. > Bartholomew's, > >New York) > >681 Plainsong > > > >Gloria Tibi (Gospel response): > > > >682 Tallis > >683 Plainsong > >684 George M. Garrett > >685 Plainsong > > > >Credo: > > > >686 Merbecke > > > >Sentence at the Presentation of the Alms: > > > >687 Pelham Humphrey (actually his "Grand Chant") > >688 arr. from Beethoven > > > >Sursum Corda: > > > >689 Plainsong > > > >Sanctus: > > > >690 Merbecke > >691 S. S. Wesley > >692 A. S. Cooper > >693 Peter C. Lutkin (1858-1931, organist of St. Clement's & > St. > >James, Chicago) > >694 Plainsong > > > >The Lord's Prayer: > > > >695 Plainsong > >696 Merbecke > > > >Gloria in Excelsis: > > > >697 Merbecke > >698 Tallis arr. T. Tertius Noble > >699 Old Scottish Chant > > > >Amen: > > > >700 Walter Henry Hall > >701 John H. Gower > >701 Dresden Amen > >703 Stainer Sevenfold Amen > > > >I don't know how widely these were used, but the inclusion > of Hodges, > >Noble and Lutkin, suggests they were at least used in St. > Clements, > >Chicago, St. James, Chicago, St. Bartholomew's, New York > and Trinity, > >Wall Street. > > > >John Speller > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Various things Anglican and the revisionist mind-set From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 16:27:07   At 12:16 PM 11/6/1999 -0800, you wrote: > >I managed to get them to buy a PLAYABLE organ (they had a moribund >Hammond Concert Model), and I bulldozed together a small choir.<snip>   A tonewheel Hammond?? Moribund?? Impossible!   hehehehe!